internal graduation

5

Okay back to happier (?) topics - today’s prompts were firsts/future/tears !!!! and honestly that’s probably a happy set why did I go for this even we might just never know

Hello, I’m Carla

Greetings internet, my name is Carla Solorzano and I am the Fall 2017 social media intern. 

Originally posted by basicshepherdsbushenjoyement

I recently graduated from the University of Texas at Arlington with a degree in English (and a minor in history, which I always forget about). No, I do not intend on becoming a teacher but if I do, please tell Past Carla she was a liar.

I hate when people ask what my hobbies are because I feel obligated to say something interesting like gardening or reading, when in reality I’m happiest when watching Cutthroat Kitchen and DMing memes with my friends.

Other things I enjoy include enthusiastically enjoying coffee, regressing into terrifying baby talk when seeing a chihuahua and consuming pop culture news like it’s junk food for my brain.

I hope this was a sufficient introduction and I (mostly) promise not to be as weird when I post here for NPR in the coming months. See you around!

Originally posted by jupiter2

Honestly if I were to ever make a high school movie about internalized misogyny I wouldn’t just make the person who was up her own ass about not being like other girls the antagonist and leave it at that. I’d have the archetype, and I’d treat it critically, but there’d also be a character who’d talk about how feminist wearing make up and embracing femininity were, and she’d be gradually revealed to be just as judgemental as the not like other girls character . The story would be about how they both needed to learn to respect each other’s differences. I think that would be way more feminist than a story about girls who like Converse or whatever being the awful ones

MoMA Conservation: Cleaning Kusama

In MoMA’s conservation studio, graduate conservation intern Jessica Chasen painstakingly cleans Yayoi Kusama’s “Accumulation No.1” (1962) whose intricate surface will require over 120 hours of treatment. See the work→ 

[Yayoi Kusama. “Accumulation No. 1.” 1962. Sewn stuffed fabric, paint, and chair fringe. Gift of William B. Jaffe and Evelyn A. J. Hall (by exchange). © 2017 Yayoi Kusama]

Appropriate Attire [Part 1]

@knockknocksoosthere said: Hi love! For your Drabble game, can I please request Namjoon, 11.“stop trying to sext me right now, i don’t need this.” & 42. “are you even real?” - dealer’s choice for genre. You are wonderful, thank you! 🖤

Warning: Contains heavy smut, fingering, squirting and semi-public sex.    

A/N: Some of the stuff in this fic references Korean work etiquette and hierarchy. It is a very set system. A hweshik is a company dinner held often with the purpose of creating a positive, family like bond between staff and usually involves drinking. 


Office romances were not your thing. You’d never been interested in sharing yourself with any of your co-workers in anything less than a professional way - and even that was a stretch at times. You did, of course, understand that they happened. There was no doubt in your mind that your office in particular was teeming with  - very poorly, for the record - hidden affairs. The clipped discussions that halted as you passed couples in the hallways. The flirty exchange of glances in meetings that were held far too long for your liking. The locked supply closet doors that you’d learned simply to return to at a more convenient time for the occupants.

Yes. You were more than certain that these things took place. But to you, they showed nothing but a weakness. A pathetic inconvenience in the human condition that prevented you from doing what you wanted - to work, finish your job in an efficient and timely manner, and return home to your couch to continue watching the latest episode of whatever you’d decided to binge on netflix that week. This infatuation your coworkers had for having sex with each other was completely lost on you.

That was until you found yourself in the exact same position as so many of them. In an office fling, for lack of a better word. You don’t know if you’d call it a romance, because from the moment it had started you’d known it was purely physical. And it wasn’t an affair, because that would imply you actually had someone to cheat on in the first place. It was just… sex.

If anything, your situation was even more pathetic than the people you called your colleagues… You didn’t know if the person who’d captured your attention was even considered a co-worker in the truest sense of the world. He didn’t technically get paid to work at the office… at least you didn’t think so, anyway.

You still weren’t sure how this whole thing had conspired - how you’d found yourself toeing a morally ambiguous line that you’d worked so hard to avoid your whole work life. But what you were sure of was that the appeal of fucking in the supply closet was now something you well and truly understood.

Kim Namjoon. 21 years old. Recent college graduate, an intern who’s sole responsibility was delivering the mail, and the only person in the entire building who thought chucks were an appropriate choice of footwear to accompany suit pants.

Keep reading

The Clinical Psychology Megapost, Or: What Is A Clinical Psychologist And How Do I Become One?

What’s a clinical psychologist?

A clinical psychologist* is a person with a clinical psychology PhD or PsyD. Typically clinical psychologists focus on topics associated with mental health or psychopathology in any group, including children, people with chronic health conditions, older adults, forensic populations, families, people living in poverty, students, and people with developmental disabilities, among others. Often clinical psychologists work within mental health systems to improve care or other outcomes among people with mental health issues.

(*Although many of these things will apply internationally, this post is geared towards psychologists in the United States and Canada. If you are in another country, your mileage may vary.)

Clinical psychologists can work:

• In medical hospitals
• In psychiatric hospitals
• In research hospitals
• In forensic hospitals
• In state and federal institutions
• In private institutions
• In prisons and other forensic settings
• At Veteran’s Affairs
• At the Department of Defense
• In community mental health settings
• In outpatient clinics
• In private practices
• In universities
• In rehabilitation centers
• In halfway houses
• In residential settings
• In research settings
• In advocacy settings
• In policy settings
• In administrative settings

Clinical psychologists work with:

• People diagnosed with mental illnesses
• People diagnosed with physical illnesses
• People currently experiencing distress or dysfunction
• The families, loved ones, or other people associated with the people mentioned above
• Other people for lots of reasons. Typically clinical psychologists work with a more severe population (people experiencing more significant problems) compared to counseling psychologists (who often focus on things like wellbeing), but not always.

Clinical psychologists can work with:

• All ages
• All genders
• All sexual orientations
• All cultural and ethnic backgrounds
• All abilities
• All educational levels
• All socioeconomic backgrounds
• All religions
• All people in general, as long as the particular clinical psychologist is competent to treat that particular person and their particular presenting problem(s)

Clinical psychologists have extremely varied responsibilities and day-to-day tasks, including:

  • Clinical work
    • Individual therapy
    • Group therapy
    • Couples’ therapy
    • Family therapy
    • Diagnostic assessments
    • Neuropsychology assessments
    • Disability assessments
    • Functional assessments
    • Legal assessments
    • Aptitude assessments
    • Intellectual assessments
    • Needs assessments
    • Creating treatment plans
    • Monitoring treatment progress
    • Coordinating care
  • Research
    • Creating research ideas and questions
    • Conducting literature reviews
    • Applying for grants
    • Conducting research
    • Conducting clinical work within research projects
    • Analyzing data
    • Writing journal articles, books, and chapters
    • Presenting findings at conferences and other events
    • Disseminating research to non-academics, including mental health clinicians
    • Applying research in real world settings (for example, implementing a new treatment found to be helpful)
  • Teaching
  • Mentoring
    • Mentoring undergraduate students, graduate students, interns, postdoctoral fellows, early career psychologists, research assistants
  • Supervising
    • Supervising clinical work
    • Supervising research
  • Training other clinicians
  • Administration
    • Leading a mental health team
    • Leading a mental health treatment program
    • Leading a research lab
    • Leading a psychology department
  • Developing new treatments
  • Developing new treatment programs
  • Developing new policies
  • Evaluating treatments
  • Evaluating treatment programs
  • Evaluating policies
  • Consulting

13 not-easy steps to becoming a clinical psychologist

1. Complete a bachelor’s degree
You will need a bachelor’s degree to get into graduate school. The easiest route to a PhD/PsyD in clinical psychology is a psychology BA or BS, possibly with another major or minor in something like biology or sociology (meaning, something connected to your interests in psychology). However, a degree in psychology is not required to get into a PhD/PsyD program in clinical psychology. If you do not major in psychology, you may need to take post-baccalaureate classes later as most PhD/PsyD programs require specific psychology classes, usually including intro, abnormal, and research & statistics.

2. Get research experience
You will need research experience to get into a PhD/PsyD program in clinical psychology. I recommend at least two years and at least two presentations. You can do this while in undergrad or afterwards. You don’t need to do research full-time (5-10 hours/week is okay) but you do need to learn about research while doing it. Don’t accept a position where all you do is data entry or mundane tasks like that. Be a part of the action- developing research ideas, conducting research, analyzing data, presenting findings. Learn all that you can from your supervisor and other people involved. Use this time to develop research skills and become better at understanding other peoples’ research and developing your own.

3. Get clinical experience (optional)
You do not need clinical experience to get into a PhD/PsyD program, but it might help. I tend to recommend it so that you can get experience in a clinical setting and/or with a clinical population so you understand better what you’re getting into. 

4. Get teaching experience (optional)
You do not need teaching experience to get into a PhD/PsyD program, but it might help. 

5. Get a master’s degree (optional)
Some people choose to get a master’s degree in clinical psychology, counseling, or experimental psychology before applying to PhD/PsyD programs. I only recommend this if you need to show you have an improved GPA and/or you want to use a master’s program to get research experience. In either case I recommend a experimental psychology program first, and then clinical psychology. 

6. Apply to PhD and/or PsyD programs in clinical psychology
You need to get in to go! (here is a post about applying to PhD/PsyD programs and a post about picking the best programs)

7. Complete a PhD or PsyD program in clinical psychology
This is the key thing. While you are in your program, get varied experience in different clinical settings with different clinical populations. Get involved with research. Say yes to many opportunities but say no to things you’re not interested in or don’t have time for. Don’t stick only to your number 1 interest- try different things, explore the possibilities. Listen to feedback and use it to get better but don’t take criticism as a comment on you as a person. Publish. Get involved with leadership and/or administrative roles. Essentially, build an impressive CV that shows that you have well-rounded skills and experience, but also are creating a niche of your own expertise. See this ask for more.

8. Complete a dissertation
The major research milestone in a PhD/PsyD program (of any type) is the dissertation. This is your major research project, where you start to carve out your area of expertise in your field. You use the dissertation to show what you’ve learned, to learn new things, and to add something important to your field. It is an enormous and difficult undertaking, but so worth it. I recommend you pick something that is achievable in the amount of time you have left (don’t make your goal “discover all genes that cause depression,” make it “determine whether cortisol is higher among people with chronic depression compared to acute depression”) and something that you will enjoy enough to keep you motivated during the years you will be working on that project.

9. Apply for a predoctoral internship program
The last clinical milestone is a pre-doctoral internship. A match process is how it’s determined where each student applying for an internship goes (similar to medical school residency programs). Students apply for internships around the United States and Canada in the fall, and interview in December and January. Students each rank the places they interviewed at in the order of their preference, and put that ranking into an online system. Each internship does the same- ranks each student in order of their preference. The system “matches” each student with an internship, attempting to match each student with the highest ranked internship possible. However, there are more students applying each year than internships, so every year students go unmatched. This year about 82% of students matched, and of those, 80% matched to an accredited internship. Accreditation is very important for future licensure and employment. This gap in matching is one reason to go to a really really good graduate program- better programs have better match rates, and many internship programs won’t review applications from students who go to unaccredited or low quality schools. See this ask for more. 

10. Complete a pre-doctoral internship program in clinical psychology
This is your last big chance to get clinical experience. So my advice is to look for programs that will help you fill important gaps in your training (for example, are you interested in PTSD but don’t have experience in Cognitive Processing Therapy? Find a program that trains in CPT) and helps you fill out your area of expertise. So, both broaden and deepen your experience. Find programs that are really interested in training you and not just getting a cheap therapist for a year. Look for places that often hire their interns as postdocs or staff psychologists, and for places that send interns to the sorts of postdocs or jobs you will want. 

11. Receive your PhD or PsyD
You’re done! Congratulations! (Remember to do your exit counseling!)

12. Apply for and complete a postdoctoral fellowship (optional)
Many (maybe most) psychologists do a postdoctoral fellowship. A postdoctoral fellowship or residency is additional training after you finish your doctoral degree.  Typical clinical postdocs are 1 year, research postdocs are 2 years, and speciality training postdocs like neuropsychology are 2 years. However some postdocs might be longer or shorter. You might do one so you can gain specific training you want or need- for example, clinical psychologists specializing in neuropsychology nearly always do a postdoc in neuropsychology (and have to in order to be boarded as a neuropsychologist), or you might want training in a particular area of research you don’t have. You might do one so you can get licensed because many jobs require applicants to already be licensed or license-eligible (and many states require supervised hours post-degree and/or other requirements). You might do one because you want a research job and it’s difficult to get one without a postdoc, particularly in academia or academia-adjacent positions. You might do one because you want to get in with a specific institution and they don’t have a job for you that year (many places hire from within, particularly from their intern and postdoc pool). 

13. Get licensed
Clinical psychologists generally get licensed within a 2-3 years of graduating (but it’s possible to do it sooner). State requirements vary a lot, so do your research so you can a) get licensed in the state you want to right now, and b) make it possible to get licensed in other states you might want to in the future. Licensure in the US always requires passing the EPPP, the national licensing exam and graduation from an APA-accredited or equivalent graduate program and internship. Many states have additional requirements like 1500 post-degree supervised clinical hours, a state exam, or additional coursework. The process is long and expensive (like everything else in this process). 

14. Get a job
This is when you finally get to be a full-fledged clinical psychologist! There are many jobs available for psychologists, but the biggest areas of need are rural and other poorly served areas. Think about what’s most important to you- type of position, type of institution, money, location, etc. –and find something that’ll work for you. 

So how long will this take?

A typical path to being a clinical psychologist looks like this:

  • Bachelor’s degree: 4 years
  • Postgraduate research experience (optional): 2 years
  • PhD/PsyD: 4-6 years
  • Predoctoral internship: 1 year
  • Postdoctoral fellowship (optional): 1-2 years (get licensed during this)
  • Job! 

So an average range is 9 to 15 years from beginning your undergraduate degree to starting your first job as a licensed clinical psychologist. Some people will need more time but it’s very unlikely to do it faster than this.

You keep mentioning “APA” and “accreditation.” What’s that?

APA is the American Psychological Association, and it is the main body that accredits (recognizes as quality and meeting minimum standards) graduate programs, Predoctoral internships, and postdoctoral fellowships in psychology. The Canadian Psychological Association (CPA), California Psychology Internship Council (CAPIC), and Psychological Clinical Science Accreditation System (PCSAS) are also reputable and professionally recognized accrediting bodies.

It is essential to go to an APA-, CPA- and/or PCSAS-accredited graduate program and a APA-, CPA-, CAPIC- and/or PCSAS-accredited internship. It will be difficult to get licensed and get a job if you don’t. Accreditation also protects students. (Also, unaccredited schools are unaccredited because they are not good schools. The accrediting standards are not very high). You don’t need an accredited postdoc, but you might choose to get one because it’s likely to make it easier to get licensed and boarded, and it may make you more marketable.

Leverage College AU

So I don’t really like high school AU’s that much, and I don’t think a Leverage one would really work. Like at least with these guys, just high school isn’t enough to truly give them a chance to become masters in their fields—they need to mature a bit.

Not to mention high school au vs college au there’d be so many more cons to do. These wouldn’t be children taking on adults, without almost any training or experience. It’d be adults vs adults, albeit adults in training, kinda. Part of the possible corruption in colleges are just how big they are. Sure, you can have a high school with maybe 5,000 students, but that’d be a small-midsized college. There are so many things to go wrong, just in their own college. Administrative issues, club issues (who has more funding, clubs trying to get approved but they keep getting blocked by someone on the administration for a bs reason), tenure—most professors are older white men, how could there not be issues—biased teachers, bribed teachers who give certain student A’s, exclusive clubs, hell cheating, test score fraud (not just SAT’s, there’s the tests you need to take for post-grad education), scholarship competition. Hell, some asshole professors make it so there’s a pre-set number of A’s in the class—do you know the kind of sabotage that could happen?

Hell, we were given an episode about an exclusive fraternity abusing a psych experiment, along with the episode about safety standards and cheerleaders. Shit happens at college.

And if they’re in a city like Philadelphia or New York City, there could be dozens of universities around. There’s not going to be a lack of people needing help.

Parker originally wasn’t supposed to be there, but the track coach once timed her running and well. They promised her lots and lots of chocolate if she actually went to school enough to be on the track team, so she got a scholarship for college. She doesn’t really care that much, but she likes math and the calculations she learns help her plan heists. The amount of times the Physics department professors have had a discussion w Parker about ‘theoretical’ issues that she brings up and. Well. It’s Parker. She also has a minor in Political Science bc she thinks it’s interesting (Listen. Remember how in the Hockey episode she knew about Schilling’s Theory of Rational Deterrence during the Cold War. I don’t make the rules Parker does.)

Also, by being on the track team she gets to travel around a lot, and it’s a readymade alibi as for why she’s in that area. She doesn’t always plan heists around the places she visits, and she goes plenty of times by herself, but it’s pretty good cover.

Since she has a scholarship, they pay for her meal plan and her housing, along w books. No, she never actually uses that room bc hello, waaaaaaaay too obvious, but that’s the point. If everyone expects her to be one place, that would be the first place they’d look for her, give her some time to get away—classic misdirection.

She has like 3 other apartments and like 4 warehouses that no one knows about that she rotates through, both sleeping AND keeping loot. But she takes the free meal plan, she doesn’t have to actually pay for them so more money for her. Not to mention some of the books have good ideas. I’m not saying she gets all A’s in her classes, but she passes.

And really, who’d think a college student is a world-renowned thief? ‘Academic’ is not exactly synonymous with that kind of crime, especially a pretty, 21 year old blonde Physics major.

She’s also a (sporadic) part of the outdoors club. What can she say—they have some pretty good climbing gear, and sometimes it can be hard to constantly get rid of gear. Just a few things—the high tech stuff she gets herself, but the basic things that aren’t easily traced to her? Yeah, it’s convenient. Plus if she’s ever caught, asking why do you have climbing gear becomes a whole lot easier to answer. Also good practice.

Nate is an Art History undergrad, Philosophy grad student who’s the team’s TA. He and Maggie were high school sweethearts, got married their junior year, Maggie had their son a few months after graduation. Nate’s now a grad student. He worked for IYS two years after graduation, interned for them every year during summers in between school and was well on his way to being their star investigator when his 3 year old son died, and they wouldn’t pay for his treatment.

He and Maggie later got divorced, and he’s back at school. They give him a stipend for school, and he doesn’t have to pay for tuition. And well. A constantly drunk Philosophy student is almost expected—he doesn’t really get in trouble with his job.

Aaaaand Hardison. Now, Hardison’s a bit more unexpected. You’d think he’d be Computer Science, but Hardison would run rings around any comp sci professor he’d have—he was only 21, tops, when the series started. Like there is not really that much of a difference between Hardison in the first season and this one in regards to computer ability. He’s a sophomore, and about 19-20.

But this is Hardison. Hardison, who isn’t just a wiz with computers—anything he touches, he can do. “I’ve hacked history” he (correctly) proclaims after figuring out a way to duplicate a 17th century journal in just 24 hours. And then there’s the time Sophie was explaining the history of a piece of art when Nate interjects, saying they already knew all of that, when Hardison interrupts, saying he doesn’t know that much before the 1980’s. Hardison’s a damn sponge when it comes to learning. The dude literally became a lawyer in one day.

So, he’s not going to be a computer science major. He wouldn’t actually learn anything from that, there’s literally 0 point. He has so many minors–an art and design minor, a music minor, and a chem minor. He’s also part of band (hello, Hardison the violin prodigy). So, he’s a mechanical engineering major—a computer, he can buy himself, but a bunch of the gadgets and gizmos he can’t get himself—or at least not easily—he can get for free at the university. Not to mention access to state of the art labs.

He mostly does it at first for his Nana, and then he finds out he genuinely loves learning. And he has a scholarship, and the cafeteria has orange soda, so everything’s all good.

And remember how excited Hardison got in the cooking episode, when he got to fire a laser? Yeah, he gets excited for all the gadgets he has access to.

But he still isn’t on the straight and narrow at all. He’s a hacker, first and foremost.

And Eliot. Oh Eliot. He’s a bit older, maybe enlisted at 17 (he kinda sorta lied), and now 22 and going to college on the GI Bill (I think that’s right). Eliot is almost more of a Jack-of-all-trades than Hardison, and it’s much more unexpected. Like in the episode they made a guy think aliens are real, he had a discussion with Hardison up Fermi’s paradox in regards to other life forms, and Eliot brings up Drake’s equation saying that with a hundred billion stars in our galaxy there’s up to 10,000 technological civilizations “you never know when you have to fight an alien.” Eliot is smart, both street smarts AND book smart and just knows a bunch about every topic. So, he double majors in Liberal Arts and minors in kinesthesiology. After going through his first semester and joining the cooking club, he also adds Culinary Science to his major.

Eliot isn’t a D1 or D3 athlete, but he does a lot of intramural and club sports. From judo to archery to badminton to table tennis, he does it all.

As for Sophie, she’s a Psych grad student, Art History/Linguistics undergrad. Yes, you’d think she’d be a Theater major, but that’s way too obvious. A grifter, who’s a Drama major? Too obvious. Yeah, the reason why Sophie never gets caught is because she never gets audition—she’s a horrible actress when people are looking. You don’t really think “great liar.” I do think she genuinely tries, but it’s also another misdirection.

So much of what Sophie does is an understanding of people, how they tick, their behavior, why they do what they do. She went to a different university for undergrad, and she’s mid 20’s—and ofc, both undergrad and grad school are using an alias. But what Sophie does is mostly enacting her interpretation of human nature. God, Sophie could come up with another approach to psychology with how much she knows, could go down in the textbooks if she wanted.

As for what she’s been doing in between, well, she has a very good cover story for that. But she needs to lie low for a little bit, and fleshing out more of an alias can always help. She developed that Charlotte Prentice alias for 7 years, it’s not out of the realm of possibility she’d do this, especially if she needs to lay low. It’s her first year at this school, and she’s not really that invested but like Parker, it can be a good cover.

She’s met Nate before, same as in the series—he’s chased after her. Although, now that he’s not working at IYS, he doesn’t really care—it’s a big school, they don’t really interact.

And just because they’re now at a university doesn’t mean the first episode would go any differently, at least at first. Or, maybe there’s a faraway professor, named Victor Dubenich, who yes, assembles the team, but doesn’t actually realize Hardison, Eliot, and Parker go to the same university as Nate—he’s much more public than the others. And maybe they don’t realize they all go to the same college, at first. Like they realize that they all live near each other, but the same college?

Because one of the advantages to being that young is that sure, you have fewer contacts and fewer scores and assets but you also have less of a record, less of a trail, fewer chances for people to find out the details of who you are.

But yes, things can get competitive in academia, especially when those plans could be sold for millions of dollars. Except, it turns out it wasn’t even from another professor. It was from a (sleep deprived) grad student.

They still take him down, and makes a seriously ridiculous amount of money. And they all enjoy it more than they thought, like what they’re doing. They start to go their own ways—except not really.

And then they walk into their Intro to Philosophy class, the one that the school requires every major to take, even Sophie, and guess who’s the TA but Nate Ford?

Someone: what are you planning on doing when you graduate?

Me, internally: ideally moving to an old house right outside a city, preferably one set back from the road a bit, and letting the yard go just enough that it seems kind of eerie and ivy covered, adopting at least two cats and up to 10 snakes, collecting all sorts of weird antiquities including unfortunately probably not haunted dolls, bat skeletons, a wooden relief from a medieval church, and anything else weird and old I can get my hands on, and settling down with my mystery novelist wife who thinks i’m charming probably

Me: Oh, you know, i’ll probably look for academic jobs with a focus on outreach and communication, but failing that industry maybe?

5 Books on Women in Craft and Design
A Shelfie from Kayleigh Perkov, Graduate Intern at the Getty Research Institute

Hi, I’m Kayleigh Perkov, graduate intern in Web and New Media/Digital Art History at the Getty Research Institute. I’m an art historian and am currently finishing up my doctoral dissertation on the integration of digital technology into craft practice in the late 1960s and early 1970s. I first started focusing on craft and design because it has such a rich—and sometimes contentious—history of engaging with women makers. In the last few years this scholarship has only become stronger and more vibrant, so to celebrate Women’s History Month, here are some of the books that inspire me about women in craft and design.

The Pink Glass Swan: Selected Essays on Feminist Art by Lucy R. Lippard. (The New Press, 1995).

This book is creased for a reason; I come back to it constantly. Written by one of the foremost art critics of the latter half of the 20th century, Lucy Lippard tackles art and feminist politics in this anthology. Of particular personal interest is “Making Something From Nothing (Towards a Definition of Women’s ‘Hobby Art’).” In this essay, Lippard complicates the standard art/craft hierarchy and ideas of cultural respectability.

Bauhaus Weaving Theory: From Feminine Craft to Mode of Design by T’ai Smith. (University of Minnesota Press, 2014). 

Art historians have long noted how women in the Bauhaus were encouraged to specialize in fiber or clay, mediums associated with traditional concepts of femininity. In this book, Smith neither laments this fact nor endeavors to boost these mediums. Instead, she engages with a collection of understudied theoretical writings from the Bauhaus weaving workshop, offering a new lens to understand the works and process of weaving.

String, Felt, Thread: The Hierarchy of Art and Craft in American Art by Elissa Auther. (University of Minnesota Press, 2009).

Auther offers an alternative history of American art in the 1960s and ‘70s, told through an engagement with textiles and fiber. Studying both feminists who valorized fiber—such as Faith Ringgold and Miriam Shapiro—and the use of fiber as material in the work of minimalist and post-minimalist artists—such as Robert Morris—Auther offers her own answers to the age-old question of why some works are considered “art” and others “craft.”

Live Form: Women, Ceramics, and Community by Jenni Sorkin. (University of Chicago Press, 2016). 

Sorkin provides a new historical grounding for contemporary participatory and socially engaged art by focusing on three major figures in postwar ceramics: Marguerite Wildenhain; Mary Caroline Richards; and Susan Peterson. In this book, Sorkin makes an important methodological, as well as historical, intervention. She asserts that ceramics as a field is less about the objects themselves, and more about the act of making, which connects both to theories of pedagogy and performance.

Women Designers in the USA, 1900-2000: Diversity and Differences by Pat Kirkham. (Yale University Press, 2002).

An anthology edited by the influential design historian Pat Kirkham, this book is one I continually find myself reaching for in the early stages of a new project. Need an introduction to the work of women in fashion design or metals? You can find it in here. I particularly value this book because it explores the work of women across a spectrum of making, from one-off craft objects to mass-produced goods designed for the commercial market.

to ib students who are suffering.

i just wanted to write it out here.

dear my fellow ib students who are suffering everywhere around the world,

please don’t think you are failing your life when you get a 5 in an exam.
no time for depression; 5 in ib is A or A- in the U.S. GPA system :))


if you are getting 6s, YOU ARE A STAR. ITS A+!!


if you get any 7s, you are rocking the whole entire world, don’t let anybody bring you down. you are on fire.


everyone else in ib knows the pain, please never ever stress out to the point you are mentally hurting yourself. we are here on the internet ♡

The Office: part 2

AN:// Hello!!! omg guys thx so much for all the support on part 1!! cute as a button, each and every one of you :)) sooooo here’s part two,, I really hope you like it and feedback is alwayz appreciated! much love <3

Part One if you haven’t read it yet

Pairing: Dylan O’Brien + Reader

Word Count: 3,748

Warnings: Swearing and mentions of sex (you’ll be fine kids)

Originally posted by francescadigiuseppe

 “You ready to go?” Ethan asked, peering over my shoulder to look at the documents I was shuffling through.

“Just one sec.” The whole scene that happened earlier still the only thing I could think about. I was so angry at Lauren. Only she could evoke this kind of response out of me, you know, considering everything that has happened between us in the past. Always wanting to start drama for entertainment purposes, and not caring who she hurts or humiliates in the process.

Just in the past few hours, I’ve been treated differently by my co-workers. The news of Ethan and I “dating” spread like wildfire and everyone knew. The people I see and talk to everyday now staring at me and whispering, as if they’re totally clueless to the fact that I can hear them.

“Poor girl, he’s only going to break her heart,” they say.

“I thought she was smarter than this.”

“Her? Of all people?”

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KingsmanTom! Part 2

Originally posted by lilpieceofmyworld

So after a bit of time seeing if people would actually want a part two i decided that i might as well just go ahead and do it because I really wanted to see where I could go with it as well, so here it is! this one ties it into the story line of the first Kingsman movie! Also credit to the one who gave me the idea in the first place, thanks @tbholland

Warnings: some strong language and then some hella cute kind of flirting stuff!

Part one: https://mgacaroline.tumblr.com/post/166768978468/kingsmantom-imagine-warnings-cussing-mention

Here goes nothing!



Scratching. You hear …. Scratching? Slowly you move your head to the left and right trying to shake the sleep out of your foggy mind. The bed is soft. Much softer than the one at your hotel. Oh god did you go home with someone last night?? You couldn’t remember. You finally open your eyes and are met with the views of a lovely soft yellow room. The curtains are pulled shut which you are thankful for, with a headache like this you don’t know how bad the sunlight would have treated you. The scratching is still there at the door to your room but you ignore it for a moment longer to pee.

Walking into the bathroom you look to see how messed up your makeup from last night must have been. However, when you see yourself looking back at you in the mirror a loud gasp comes from your lips. You see the left side of your face bruised badly with a cut running from the side of your forehead to down below your eyebrow.

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