intermarry

pandafleur  asked:

I've a Leap of Thought I'd like to share with you. It's probs a little out there and a little long so bear with me okay? So, in AItSM Tobirama says he gets his red eyes from his Uzumaki grandmother and I immediately thought about Karin the only red-eyed Uzumaki I know of. That jumped to; Karin heals people when they bite her, is that an Uzumaki quirk in general or a red-eyed Uzumaki quirk In Specific? If yes, would Tobirama have inherited it as well? (pt1)

Is it even common knowledge that Uzumaki can heal like that or is it a secret to prevent the clan as a whole from being literally cannibalized?(defsecret) More importantly, would the Senju know considering how frequently they intermarry or would only specific individuals be informed out of necessity? If Tobirama did have the quirk do you think he got so good at healing so he wouldn’t have to resort to it? This is only speculation, there’s a huge dearth on info about other Uzumaki after all

It’s so ridiculous that we never got any information on the Uzumaki beyond “big chakra reserves, had a village but it’s gone now :( but we were friends!!” Like, I know Kishimoto clearly values father/child bonds over mother/child anything, which is why we got Minato ad nauseum with no Kushina at all, but the lack of anything about the Uzumaki is incredibly disappointing. 

I was actually thinking of Karin when I wrote that bit! This is complete headcanon, but - I always have thought that the Uzumaki women were the powerhouses, and Naruto is a bit of a rarity when it comes to their genes. So going by that, Tobirama wouldn’t have the ability - he has high chakra levels, especially compared to most shinobi, but nothing on par with Mito or Kushina. But, of course, that’s just my headcanon. 

Queens of France from The Royal House of Bourbon

The Royal House of Bourbon was an extremely powerful aristocratic family of French origin whose members founded royal dynasties in several European countries, exhibiting incredible influence. The first Bourbon to achieve royal rank was Henry IV, King of France in 1589.  His three daughters managed to make some great dynastic alliances by intermarrying with three major European royal houses.


Margaret of Valois (14 May 1553 – 27 March 1615) was daughter of King Henry II of France and Catherine de’ Medici, sister of Kings Francis II, Charles IX and Henry III and of Queen Elizabeth of Spain. She is also known as “Margaret of France” because she was a princess of France by birth. She married her distant cousin, King Henry of Navarre  on 18 August 1572 and she thus became the Queen of Navarre in 1572. In 1589, after all her brothers had died without fathering sons, Margaret’s husband succeeded to the French throne and became King Henry IV of France, the first Bourbon King of France. Margaret thus became Queen of France.  Their marriage was annulled in 1599 with an agreement that allowed Margaret to maintain the title of Queen.


Marie de’ Medici (26 April 1575 – 3 July 1642) was  of Francesco I de’ Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany, and Archduchess Joanna of Austria.  She married King Henry IV of France in October 1600 following the annulment of his marriage to Margaret of Valois.  Following the assassination of her husband in 1610, which occurred the day after her coronation, she acted as regent for her son, King Louis XIII of France, until he came of age. She was noted for her ceaseless political intrigues at the French court and extensive artistic patronage.


Anne of Austria (22 September 1601 – 20 January 1666) was  was the eldest daughter of King Philip III of Spain and his wife Margaret of Austria. She held the titles of Infanta of Spain and of Portugal and Archduchess of Austria.  Anne was betrothed at age eleven to King Louis XIII of France. On 24 November 1615, Louis and Anne were married by proxy in Burgos. This marriage followed the tradition of cementing military and political alliances between France and Spain.  Anne was named regent upon her husband’s death in 1643.  Their four-year-old son was crowned King Louis XIV of France.


Maria Theresa of Spain (10 September 1638 – 30 July 1683)  was Infanta of Spain as the daughter of King Philip IV of Spain and Elisabeth of France. She married her cousin, King Louis XIV of France, on 9 June 1660 after the end of long war between France and Spain.  Famed for her virtue and piety, she saw five of her six children die in early childhood.


Marie Leszczyńska (23 June 1703 – 24 June 1768) was a daughter of King Stanisław I of Poland and Catherine Opalińska. She married King Louis XV of France  on 5 September 1725. Marie was twenty-two years old and Louis  was fifteen. They had 10 live children, seven of whom survived to adulthood. Marie is known to have had a close relationship with all of her children. She was the longest-serving queen consort of France and was popular due to her generosity and piety.


Marie Antoinette (2 November 1755 – 16 October 1793). She was born Maria Antonia Josepha Johanna von Habsburg-Lothringen, an Archduchess of Austria, was the fifteenth and second youngest child of Francis I, Holy Roman Emperor and Empress Maria Theresa. In April 1770, upon her marriage (at the age of 14 years and 5 months) to Louis-Auguste, heir to the throne of France, she became Dauphine of France. On 10 May 1774, when her husband ascended the throne as King Louis XVI of France, upon the death of his grandfather Louis XV, she became Queen of France and Navarre, a title she held until September 1791, when, as the French Revolution proceeded.

4

Pioneer Cemetery, Letchworth State Park - Castile, NY

  “This cemetery is the resting place for at least two dozen early settlers to the falls area. It is believed that the burials, or at least the stones, were moved here from another location in the park.
  A number of graves are unmarked. In the 1950s, visitors could identify the names of ten different families on the gravestones. The earliest known burial is that of Harriet Davis, who died in 1817. The last burial recorded is that of another Davis family member, Maria A., who died in 1915.
  A study of the names on the gravestones revealed that before moving to the Genesee Valley, settlers lived in New Hampshire; Connecticut; Saratoga, New York; and Sangerfield, New York. many of these families intermarried.”

  -Information from a sign at the site

anonymous asked:

I found a group of italian Odinists and they sound a little fanatical. If you want join their group you must have longobard blood. What do you think? What's the idea among the heathens?

It’s no secret that Heathenry has a major problem with white supremacists and neo-nazis. Tumblr is actually one of the safer online spaces in that regard, and as anyone who’s looked through the tags has seen, we aren’t exactly free of that here either. That’s why the Valkyrie Squad exists.

These views aren’t borne out of history or the lore. Our concept of race is actually pretty modern, and the Norse did a ton of raiding, trading, and yes, intermarrying with people who today would be considered POC. Even most of the Aesir were said to be descended from and/or intermarried with other tribes, such as the Vanir and Jotnar. And there are definitely modern Heathens out there who believe Heathenry is open to anyone regardless of descent.

But as you’ve discovered, not everyone shares those views. The modern revival of interest in the Germanic gods was born out of Romantic nationalism, and the Nazis appropriated a lot of the imagery, so there are unfortunately still a lot of Heathens drawn to the faith as an outlet for their hateful views. Always use caution when interacting with unfamiliar Heathens, especially as a POC or LGBT+ individual. It’s a good idea to familiarize yourself with neo-nazi symbolism to quickly identify and avoid groups who may be dangerous.

Regretfully, none of our mods can help with Italian resources. If anyone reading this happens to be able to, please reblog so the asker can get in touch.

- Mod E

Queens of Spain from The Royal House of Habsburg (1/2)

The Royal House of Habsburg was one of the most influential royal houses of Europe. Rudolph of Habsburg become King of Germany in 1273 and the dynasty of the House of Habsburg was truly entrenched in 1276 when Rudolph became ruler of Austria, which the Habsburgs ruled until 1918.  From the sixteenth century, following the reign of Charles V, the dynasty was split between Austrian and Spanish branches. Although they ruled distinct territories, they nevertheless maintained close relations and frequently intermarried. 


Isabella of Portugal (24 October 1503 – 1 May 1539) was an Infanta of Portugal, by birth, and a Holy Roman Empress, Queen of Germany, Italy, Spain, Naples and Sicily, Duchess of Burgundy etc. as the spouse of Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor. She was the daughter of Manuel I of Portugal and Maria of Aragon. She served as regent of Spain during the absence of her spouse for long periods.


Mary I of England (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558) was the only child of Henry VIII and his first wife Catherine of Aragon to survive to adulthood. She was the Queen of England and Ireland from July 1553 after the dead of her younger half-brother, Edwar VI  (son of Henry andJane Seymour). In 1554, Mary married King Philip of Spain, becoming Queen consort of Habsburg- Spain on his accession in 1556. 


Elisabeth of Valois or Isabel de Valois (2 April 1545 – 3 October 1568) was the eldest daughter of Henry II of France and Catherine de’ Medici. The 14-year-old Elisabeth married the 32-year-old King Philip II of Spain on 2 February 1560. His second wife, Mary I of England, had recently died, making Elisabeth as Philip’s third wife. Elisabeth had originally been betrothed to Philip’s son, Carlos, Prince of Asturias, but political complications unexpectedly necessitated instead a marriage to Philip. They had 2 daughters, Infantas Isabella and Catherine of Spain. 


Anna of Austria (1 November 1549 – 26 October 1580). She was the eldest daughter of Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian II, and Maria of Spain.  She was Queen of Spain by virtue of her marriage to her maternal uncle, King Philip II of Spain. She was Philips’ fourth and most beloved wife. 


Margaret of Austria (25 December 1584 – 3 October 1611) was  the daughter of Archduke Charles II of Austria and Maria Anna of Bavaria.  Margaret married Philip III of Spain, her first cousin, once-removed, on 18 April 1599 and became a very influential figure at her husband’s court. Philip had an “affectionate, close relationship” with Margaret, and paid her additional attention after she bore him a son in 1605.

rightwingwatch.org
Alex Jones: Elites Intermarry To Preserve Demonic Bloodline
Yesterday, Trump ally and conspiracy theorist extraordinaire Alex Jones hosted Steve Quayle, an End Times radio host, and Gary Heavin, the founder of the Curves fitness chain and a conservative activist, to discuss the Satanic powers running the government.

Quayle explained that God is using Donald Trump to give Americans one last warning that judgment is coming: “Donald Trump, in my opinion, is God’s prosecuting attorney. He’s laying out the evidence. It’s like everything evil is swarming upon him. I think the fascinating thing about this is that I gave a word that I really thought was an answer to prayer, God said, ‘Before I allow America to be destroyed by the Russians and the Chinese, now this is hard to take, I’m going to reveal the sins of America’s leaders to the people and the people’s sins before a Holy God.’”

Queens of Spain from The Royal House of Bourbon (1/3)

The Royal House of Bourbon was an extremely powerful aristocratic family of French origin whose members founded royal dynasties in several European countries, exhibiting incredible influence. The first Bourbon to achieve royal rank was Henry IV, King of France in 1589.  His three daughters managed to make some great dynastic alliances by intermarrying with three major European royal houses. The Spanish House of Bourbon was founded by Philippe, Duc d’Anjou (grandson of King Louis XIV of France) who became King Philip V of Spain in 1700.


Maria Luisa of Savoy (17 September 1688 – 14 February 1714) was the daughter of Victor Amadeus II, Duke of Savoy and his French-born wife Anne Marie d'Orléans.  Maria Luisa was wed by proxy to King Philip V of Spain on 12 September 1701 at the age of barely thirteen. Despite her young age, Maria Luisa’s effective regency made her admired in Madrid and throughout Spain.


Elisabeth Farnese (Spanish: Isabel de Farnesio; 25 October 1692 – 11 July 1766) was Queen of Spain as the second wife of King Philip V. Elisabeth was a natural choice for Philip V because of the traditional Spanish interests in Italian provinces, as she was the heir of the Parmesan throne. She married Philip V of Spain in 1714 after the death of his first wife. Elisabeth exerted great influence over Spain’s foreign policy and was the de facto ruler of Spain from 1714 until 1746. From 1759 until 1760, she governed as regent.


Louise Élisabeth d'Orléans (Spanish: Luisa Isabel; 11 December 1709 – 16 June 1742) was the daughter of Philippe II, Duke of Orléans, and his wife, Françoise Marie de Bourbon. She married Louis I of Spain in 1722. Louise became Queen consort of Spain when her husband ascended the throne due to his father, Philip V, abdication in 1724. But after only seven months of reign, Louis died of smallpox. Because he died without an heir, his father ascended the throne once again.


Barbara of Portugal (also known as Maria Bárbara; 4 December 1711 – 27 August 1758) was the eldest child of King John V of Portugal and his wife, Archduchess Maria Anna of Austria.  In 1729 at the age 18, Barbara married the future Ferdinand VI of Spain. The couple produced no viable children. .


Maria Amalia of Saxony ( 24 November 1724 – 27 September 1760) was a German princess from the House of Wettin, the daughter of Augustus III of Poland and the wife of Charles III of Spain; she was the Queen consort of Naples and Sicily from 1738 till 1759 and then Queen consort of Spain from 1759 until her death in 1760. She was the mother of thirteen children, many of whom died in childhood. Maria Amalia was politically active and openly participated in state affairs in both Naples and Spain.


Maria Luisa of Parma (9 December 1751 – 2 January 1819)  was the youngest daughter of Philip, Duke of Parma and his wife, Princess Louise-Élisabeth of France. Maria Luisa married her first cousin, Charles IV of Spain, in 1765 and became the Queen consort of Spain from 1788 to 1808. The couple had fourteen children, six of whom survived into adulthood. 

Queens of Spain from The Royal House of Bourbon (3/3)

The Royal House of Bourbon was an extremely powerful aristocratic family of French origin whose members founded royal dynasties in several European countries, exhibiting incredible influence. The first Bourbon to achieve royal rank was Henry IV, King of France in 1589.  His three daughters managed to make some great dynastic alliances by intermarrying with three major European royal houses. The Spanish House of Bourbon was founded by Philippe, Duc d’Anjou (grandson of King Louis XIV of France) who became King Philip V of Spain in 1700.


Maria de las Mercedes of Orléans (24 June 1860 – 26 June 1878) was the daughter of Antoine of Orléans, Duke of Montpensier and Infanta Luisa Fernanda of Spain (sister of Queen Isabella II of Spain). She married her first cousing, King Alfonso XII of Spain on 23 January 1878.  The marriage would last only six months, during which she had a miscarriage. Queen Mercedes succumbed to the illness in Madrid two days after her 18th birthday, on 26 June 1878, having been unconscious for several days. 


Maria Christina of Austria (21 July 1858 – 6 February 1929) was  a daughter of Archduke Karl Ferdinand of Austria and Archduchess Elisabeth Franziska of Austria.  Maria Christina married King Alfonso XII of Spain on 29 November 1879.  When the King died in 1885, Maria Christina was pregnant, so the throne was vacant. During this period, Maria Christina ruled as Regent until her child, a son, was born, who was Alfonso XIII of Spain from birth. Maria Christina continued as regent until Alfonso XIII attained his majority in 1902; she is the “Her Majesty the Queen Regent of Spain”. 


Victoria Eugenie of Battenberg (24 October 1887 – 15 April 1969) was the daughter of Prince Henry of Battenberg and Princess Beatrice of United Kingdom. She was also the youngest grand-daughter of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom.  Princess Victoria Eugenie married King Alfonso XIII of Spain on 31 May 1906.  They had five sons and two daughters. The Spanish royal family went into exile on 14 April 1931 after municipal elections brought Republicans to power in most of the major cities, leading to the proclamation of the Second Spanish Republic. The royal family went to live in France and later Italy. Victoria Eugenie and Alfonso later separated, and she lived partly in the UK and, after being invited to leave Britain by its government, in Switzerland.


Princess Sophia of Greece and Denmark, born on 2 November 1938 is the eldest child of King Paul of Greece and Queen Frederica. Her brother is the deposed King Constantine II of Greece. Married to her paternal third cousin, Prince Juan Carlos of Spain on 14 May 1962 in Athens. She became Queen consort of Spain upon her husband’s accession in 1975 as King Juan Carlos I. The couple has three children: Infanta Elena, Infanta Christina,  and Felipe, Prince of Asturias. On 19 June 2014, King Juan Carlos abdicated in favour of his son,  King Felipe VI of Spain. 


Letizia Ortiz Rocasolano, born on 15 September 1972 is the eldest daughter of Jesús José Ortiz Álvarez, a journalist, and María de la Paloma Rocasolano Rodríguez, a registered nurse.  Before her marriage to Prince Felipe of Spain on 22 May 2004, Letizia was a journalist and news anchor. Letizia became the Queen of Spain when her husband, King Felipe VI,  ascended the Spanish throne on 19 June 2014 on the abdication of his father Juan Carlos I. Letizia and Felipe have two daughters, Leonor, Princess of Asturias, who is now the heir presumptive; and Infanta Sofía. 

Queens of Spain from The Royal House of Habsburg (2/2)

The Royal House of Habsburg was one of the most influential royal houses of Europe. Rudolph of Habsburg become King of Germany in 1273 and the dynasty of the House of Habsburg was truly entrenched in 1276 when Rudolph became ruler of Austria, which the Habsburgs ruled until 1918.  From the sixteenth century, following the reign of Charles V, the dynasty was split between Austrian and Spanish branches. Although they ruled distinct territories, they nevertheless maintained close relations and frequently intermarried.


Elisabeth of France (22 November 1602 – 6 October 1644) was the eldest daughter of King Henry IV of France and his second spouse Marie de’ Medici. In 1615, she married Philip IV of Spain and became the Queen consort of Spain (1621 to 1644) and Portugal (1621 to 1640).


Mariana of Austria (born Maria Anna; 24 December 1634 – 16 May 1696) was the granddaughter of Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand II. Her parents were Crown Prince Ferdinand and Maria Anna of Spain. In 1649, she married to her maternal uncle, King Philip IV of Spain,  as the second wife. At the death of her husband in 1665, Queen Mariana became regent for her son Charles II, the last Spanish Habsburg, and she remained an influential figure during his reign.


Marie Louise de Orléans (26 March 1662 – 12 February 1689) was the eldest daughter of Philippe, Duke of Orléans, and Henrietta Anne of England. She was a granddaughter of Louis XIII of France. In 1679, Marie Louise married Charles II of Spain. Her marriage to Charles II was seen as a way to induce better relations between France and Spain; the two nations had been on bad terms because of her uncle’s (Louis XVI) battles in the Spanish Netherlands.  


Maria Anna of Neuburg (Spanish: Mariana; 28 October 1667 – 16 July 1740) was  he was the twelfth child of Philip William, Elector of the Palatinate, and Elisabeth Amalie of Hesse-Darmstadt.  When the first wife of Charles II of Spain had died childless on 12 February 1689, Maria Anna was chosen out of the many candidates to become his second wife because her ancestors had been very fertile - her parents had 17 children. She was Queen of Spain from 1689 to 1700.

Queens of Spain from The Royal House of Bourbon (2/3)

The Royal House of Bourbon was an extremely powerful aristocratic family of French origin whose members founded royal dynasties in several European countries, exhibiting incredible influence. The first Bourbon to achieve royal rank was Henry IV, King of France in 1589.  His three daughters managed to make some great dynastic alliances by intermarrying with three major European royal houses. The Spanish House of Bourbon was founded by Philippe, Duc d’Anjou (grandson of King Louis XIV of France) who became King Philip V of Spain in 1700. 


Maria Isabel of Portugal (19 May 1797 – 26 December 1818) was an Infanta of Portugal and daughter of John VI of Portugal and his wife Carlota Joaquina of Spain. She was a sister of Pedro I of Brazil. She married her maternal uncle King Ferdinand VII of Spain on 29 September 1816.  She died on 26 December 1818 while giving birth to a stillborn daughter. 


Maria Josepha Amalia of Saxony (6 December 1803 – 18 May 1829) was the youngest daughter of Prince Maximilian of Saxony and Princess Carolina of Parma. She married King Ferdinand VII of Spain on 20 October 1819 in Madrid. After his two childless marriages, there was great pressure for the Bourbon dynasty in Spain to ensure that King Ferdinand VII had an heir and the Saxon princesses were renowned for their fertility.  Nevertheless, the marriage remained childless. She died as a result of fevers on 18 May 1829. 


Maria Christina of the Two Sicilies (27 April 1806 – 22 August 1878)  the daughter of King Francis I of the Two Sicilies and Maria Isabella of Spain. She married her maternal uncle, King Ferdinand VII of Spain (who just lost his 3rd wife) on  11 December 1829.  Maria Christina, delivered two daughters, the future Queen Isabella II and the Infanta Luísa Fernanda and two sons who did not survive past one year. She was Queen consort of Spain from 1829 to 1833 and Regent of Spain (for her young daughter, Isabella) from 1833 to 1840. 


Doña Isabel II also know as Queen Isabella II (10 October 1830 – 10 April 1904)  the eldest daughter of King Ferdinand VII of Spain and Maria Christina of Bourbon-Two Sicilies.  Isabella was 3 years old when she was proclaimed Queen on her father’s death in 1833. Isabel succeeded to the throne because Ferdinand VII had induced the Cortes Generales to help him set aside the Salic law, introduced by the Bourbons in the early 18th century, and to re-establish the older succession law of Spain. Her right to succeed to the throne was disputed by supporters of her uncle, Don Carlos, who refused to recognize a female sovereign, leading to the Carlist Wars (1833–1839). After a troubled reign, she was deposed in the Glorious Revolution of 1868, and formally abdicated in 1870. Her son Alfonso XII became king in 1874.