interchangeability

aneternalscoutandabrownie  asked:

man everyone has these cool/funny stories about how they realized their own sexuality whereas mine was like "I called myself bi and straight interchangeably for about five years and then just gradually started phasing the straight part out once I stopped kidding myself". I HAVE had a mostly unarticulated crush on this one friend for approximately ten years that I've only just recently begun to come to terms with though.

dude SHOOT YOUR SHOT

anonymous asked:

I don’t understand some can interchange Tom for Seb. They’re appeal isn’t for the same reasons.

Yeah me either- a lot did though. I mean, he’s cute but he doesn’t float my boat like Mr Hiddleston.

i’m getting a lot of salt and angst over that post almost entirely from young, white artists so i’m just gonna drop one statement on it.

obligatory “i’m white”. obligatory “i’m not the best artist and am still always learning”. obligatory “i was a beginner too”. fact of the matter is, though, that what i brought up in that post is not endemic only to beginner artists. it’s something i see very technically skilled people doing, and it demonstrates a very fundamental flaw in the notion of “aesthetic”.

altering a character’s features as portrayed in their canon (or god forbid, an actual real actor) so their complexion is creamier, their features are narrower, and their hair is smoother is a deliberate choice. art is translating lines and shapes into something cohesive and recognizable. you choose to make those lines.

if you are using the wrong ones, you lose cohesion.  stylization does not mean recognition is lost. 

the situation described by my post can range anywhere from ignorance to the notion that the human face is not a template with interchangeable potato head parts all the way to a malicious belief that non-white features are ugly.

i’m not making accusations one way or another.

but i am saying that it’s very, very noticeable and the hurt you might feel by me calling you a fucking gremlin doesn’t really compare to people seeing themselves be erased in art. i am not engaging anybody directly over the matter because quite frankly 90% of the angst on that post is from teens. get better. use references. don’t be defensive when someone points out offensive behavior.

and that’s all im gonna say on the matter! 

If anyone ever tries to tell you that slavery never existed in Canada, they’re lying to your face and are perpetuating myths of Canadian benevolence and US-Canada contrasts. They’re ignoring over 200 years of enslavement, and the recorded 2,683 Indigenous slaves, mainly from the Pawnee Nation, and the recorded 1,443 Black slaves that occupied New France ALONE before the Conquest by the British. By the way, the entire population of New France back then was apx. 60,000, and the enslaved population made up 4,200 of those.

(So if French Canadians tell you that slavery appeared with the British Conquest, in actuality the British took steps to make it easier for people to own slaves through Article XLVII of the Articles of Capitulation, that many French settlers at that time took advantage of.)

Slaves were held by fur trading post officers, colonial officials, members of the military, Jesuits, Roman Catholic Churches, Baptist Churches, 50% of the later Quebec Parliament, and the common people who often went into debt to have the status symbol of owning a slave.

In 1781, the island of St. John (now P.E.I) passed a law that legalized slavery and paid a 40 shilling bonus for every Black slave brought into the province. In 1790, the Imperial Statute allowed British Loyalists from the states to bring in slaves to the whole country without tax. The same went for the cutlery, furniture, and farm tools they brought with them.

People will try to tell you that Indigenous people owned slaves as well. They kept prisoners of war and exchanged people to pay off debts and replace war-dead, but they were never dehumanized like slaves under European slavery. The two systems are not the same and aren’t even remotely interchangeable.

Slaves weren’t treated like members of the family or like well-loved butlers. They were subject to the same treatment endured by slaves in the 13 colonies. Ownership was justified in similar ways as well: using the Labour Supply argument, where white workers were “too costly” to hire and Black slaves were sometimes said to be “too expensive to import from the French Caribbean.” (They were sold here anyways.) This explains the higher amount of Indigenous slaves.

It also means that Black people have been in Canada for as long as whites; the first recorded slave in Canada showed up in 1629. He was from either Madagascar or Guinea.

People will cite Canada’s lack of a Code Noir as proof of a lack of slavery. Just because we didn’t have a specific document to regulate it doesn’t mean it didn’t exist. It did. There are newspaper advertisements in such papers as the Montreal Gazette for runaway slaves and slaves that were up for sale.

The life expectancy of a slave in Canada was 17 years old. The 1790 Act to Limit Slavery pushed by John Simcoe said that slaves born after 1790 would be freed at age 25. See how that doesn’t work?

But most importantly, people will try to tell you that slaves didn’t resist. They did. They launched legal protests and challenges, but were opposed by Judicial members who owned slaves themselves.

Well-known Canadian figures who owned slaves include but aren’t limited to:

James McGill of McGill University fame, Joseph Brant, Sir John Johnson, and William Jarvis.

Modern historians and scholars have tried to deny this. A historian who tried to tell the true story was Professor Marcel Trudel, who wrote “Canada’s Forgotten Slaves: 200 Years of Bondage” in the 1960’s. He was shunned by the academic community, relocated to Ottawa University from his previous chair, and was personally asked by Quebec politicians to stay quiet about the matter because he revealed that slavery existed in New France before the British - destroying the idea of French Canadian moral superiority in that regard. He died in 2011, and his book which so many tried to discredit but so many never could, was only translated into English in 2013.

Slavery existed in Canada. Don’t let anyone tell you differently.

6

The family that pranks together stays together. Also I’m pretty sure Ezra is just glad that Sabine has stopped pranking him in favor of a new crewmember. Also welcome, Specter 7! Also I SPENT ALL DAY MAKING THIS STUPID COMIC HELP

Bonus:

Beginner Witchery

Disclaimer: Witchcraft is NOT a religion! It is a practice, or skill. Anyone of ANY religion can be a witch!

There are a few steps to becoming a witch, and the first is taking an interest, which you obviously have and its led you to my post. Many things lead people to magic! Maybe you’ve always felt a strong connection with Mother Earth and her lovely inhabitants, or maybe your friend is a witch and recently has been open about it with you. The second step is exploring the craft, Reading witchy books and blogs, and gathering information. The final steps are to start calling yourself a witch and start practicing witchcraft. Those steps are interchangeable, it doesn’t matter what comes first.


When it comes to learning more about witchcraft, a lot of baby witches ask me the million dollar question… “What do I study first?”

Theres no exact order you need to follow. I’d advise you to be respectful to magick, to the elements and to mother earth. Start being more aware of all she gives us, if you aren’t already.

Here are some things you can do/look into to get yourself started:

  1. Witchblr. DON’T UNDERESTIMATE WITCHBLR. There is so much information on witchblr, its really amazing. 
  2. History of witchcraft. Studying the roots of the craft is so interesting to do! Its really cool to hear the origins of everything we do.
  3. Crystals. Crystals are my FAVORITE, my collection is always growing and i pick specific ones to carry based on what i need the day of.
  4. Divination Methods. There are several ways to divine, and its really nice to get some insight from your spirit guide/the universe. Studying the origins of these methods is also really interesting.
  5. Herbs. Herbs are awesome and you can use them for everything, be it magick or mundane. They are great for using in spell jars, teas, baths and etc.
  6. Dreams. Study what they mean, why they’re important and how you can benefit from listening in to the deeper messages they hold.
  7. Keep a dream journal! Start recording everything you can remember as soon as you wake up.
  8. Grounding. I think everyone should ground themselves at least once a day, it makes you feel so balanced.
  9. Celestial Bodies. Each planet has a different energy, and you can use these energies potentially.
  10. THE MOON. The moon has so much energy its so powerful and i love feeling it shine on my skin. Its phases have significant effects on us and on our spellwork.
  11. The elements. Each element brings a different energy, and when you cast circles you typically call on each element. its nice to know about these energies and find which ones you click with the most.
  12. Altar Tools. 
  13. Deities. Study the different pantheons, see if one appeals to you. if not, its ok, not everyone works with them.
  14. Meditate. Get in tune with yourself. Thats the best thing you can do while on this spiritual journey.
  15. Sigils.
  16. Talismans.
  17. Different Alphabets
  18. Types of spells
  19. Types of magick
  20. Famous witches.

A few more tips from me:

  • Keep journals. yes. plural. one for dreams, one for your general day to day feelings and to record your growth spiritually, one for the crystals and herbs you collect (or one for each), one for your studies. You CANNOT record too much! Take notes on everything.
  • never do anything you don’t feel comfortable with.
  • Never rush ahead of yourself. Take your time with learning about the craft, you will thank yourself in the future.
  • Use what you have! You don’t need supplies to be a witch or have a successful spell. Its all mental and about your flow of energy. you just need YOU.
  • your craft is your own, do not feel pressured to be more like witches you admire, do whatever feels right to you.
  • unless you follow a specific tradition, there are no rules in witchcraft. There is a lot more freedom in witchcraft than you may realize.
  • DOn’t ever shame other witches. Best example: Some witches curse, some don’t. 
  • i know i said this earlier, but be respectful. always remember to thank mother earth for everything she supplies us with.
  • Always say goodbye to any entities you call into your circle.
  • NEVER be scared of spirits. they are all around us, all the time, they only make themselves known sometimes. fear can feed them and help them grow in strength.
  • don’t worry about a title, you don’t need to scramble to find our what kind of witch you are. you will just know eventually based on what you do most in your practice, it will take some time.

MY ASKS ARE OPEN, IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, ASK AND I WILL ANSWER WITHIN 2-4 DAYS. you can also send me a message.

Please add to this so any baby witches can see what you have to say and be informed!! You can also submit a post to my blog.

I will add to this post in the future, i hope it was helpful.

Blessed be!

The importance of Magnus Bane also lies in his intersectionality and that’s so important and we need to remember it and be aware so we aren’t trampling on each other’s representation.

Magnus is important because he’s bi and he’s not treated as confused or slutty or indecisive.

Magnus is important because he’s an Asian man and he’s not desexualized or submissive. He’s canonically powerful and highly desirable.

He’s a bisexual Asian man of color being treated with dignity and respect being written with care and love and given a unique and interesting story, he’s a literal fucking unicorn, dragon, what have you. He’s practically a fucking mythical creature.

We really need to think about it and savor it tbh.