integrated-coastal-zone-management

ango!! my favorite boy!!!!

Something I’ve run into quite a lot while doing the whole “project manager” thing is artist who are openly hostile to the idea of engaging with the “business side” of what they do. There’s this broad perception that that business side of art means advertising and merchandising and selling out, and while it certainly can mean that, a lot of it is much more basic - and it’s stuff that’s absolutely not optional if art is anything beyond a personal fun-time hobby for you.

Stuff like:

1. Having reality-based metrics for time and resource commitment - or, in plain English, making sure that what you’re charging for your commissions is actually based on how hard they are to do.

It’s downright shocking how rare this is. I’ve encountered digital artists who routinely charge less for a spec that takes them much longer to do based on purely abstract notions of how “complex” the piece is, without reference to their actual, demonstrable time commitment. Heck, I’ve run into a traditional artist who ended up making nickles per hour for a major commission because she hadn’t correctly tallied up the cost of the art supplies expended in producing it!

The only way to arrive at appropriate metrics is based on evidence; your off-the-cuff estimates will always, always be wrong. Literally time yourself as you work on pieces of various types, and write down how long it took you. And never assume that it will be quicker next time; that’s called the planning fallacy, and it will eat you alive if you let it.

2. Having a lifecycle management plan for the tools you need to work.

Tablets don’t last forever. Neither do computers. Even software can become so outdated and incompatible as to lose utility over time. Basically, your tools have a finite lifespan, and you need to have a plan for replacing them as needed.

I understand that many independent artists don’t have the means to save up for new and replacement tools, and rely on second-hand hardware, gifts from friends and family, or donation drives on their blogs to fill the gap. That’s fine - artists relying on patronage has a long and distinguished history. The important thing is that these avenues be part of a plan, not a desperate scramble after some 100% foreseeable circumstance has rendered you unable to work.

Data on average time-to-failure for your hardware is readily accessible online; if, for example, that particular brand of tablet tends to last about three years, then you need to start organising your donation drive or dropping hints for your birthday at two years and six months, even if your equipment seems perfectly fine. The same goes for software; the vendor’s support window (i.e., the time after which they’ll stop publishing bugfixes and security updates) for your version of the software is a known factor.

3.  Having a formal requirements-gathering and signoff procedure.

I know that sounds like a lot of boring paperwork, and to be honest it kind of is, but it’s also critical for anything you’re not drawing for yourself. Language is an imprecise medium; based on a few minutes of casual conversation, you can easily end up in situations where you and your commissioner have totally different understandings of what the job entails, yet you’re both convinced you’ve understood the other perfectly.

You should have a detailed written description of what’s involved, and your client’s explicit, documented confirmation that they’ve read, understood and agreed to it, before you draw a single stroke. This includes timelines and deliverables as well as content; I’ve run into numerous cases of clients who’ve alleged non-delivery of services based on their understanding that they’d be receiving a traditional, ink-and-paper piece where the artist understood the commission to involve only digital work, and more than one case where a client started hollering about breach of contract less than 24 hours after signing off because they honestly thought it would be done already.

You have to nip that in the bud; this level of documentation is a bare minimum for anyone who takes money to do art, not a nice-to-have.

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I …well .. I do have an excuse for this actually. This is all @haikyoutooiguess ‘s fault. They were my exchange partner for the iwaoi exchange and had “KyouKen” written as their … fav other ship? :’D .. and……… then this happened? I’m sorry? Kind of?

Also, everyone has their own interpretation of Lup’s eventual objection to being called Lulu, but as a sibling who has a fair share of tolerated yet somewhat obnoxious nicknames, I appreciated it as a “you know what, you’re being a jerk, your affectionate sibling nickname privileges are revoked until you shape up” moment. This was something Lup took very seriously and Taako was being a bit flippant about it and she made it clear that this was not the time to be winding her up. Lulu is okay when they’re pulling each other’s hair, not when an entire civilization is at stake.  

Yuri and Otabek for the Modern Witch - Pagan AU I’m cooking up 

btw Yuri is 110% the most fashionable witch you’ll ever meet

good taz thought: on the tenth or eleventh plane the ipre squad visits, cameras have already been invented, and they manage to take a couple polaroid cameras with them when they yeet outta there at the end of their year. after that, they make a point of taking pictures of every world they go to — for documentation purposes as much as for fun — but they also end up with a lot of silly candids of each other, and the pictures get taped up all over the walls of the starblaster, and its real good + happy