instinctive

Time Not Lost (2459 words) by LeWendigogo
Chapters: 1/?
Fandom: Hannibal (TV), Hannibal Lecter Series - All Media Types
Rating: Not Rated
Warnings: Major Character Death
Relationships: Hannibal Lecter/AdamTowers, Will Graham/Hannibal Lecter
Characters: Hannibal Lecter, Adam Towers
Additional Tags: Time Not Lost, Hannitowers, Hannigram - Freeform

Summary:

What do you do when you lose the love of your life only to meet the very image of them yet again? When time reverses itself, and the teacup reassembles, wouldn’t you indulge? Try for a second chance?

After the battle with the Great Red Dragon, both Hannibal Lecter and Will Graham embrace just before their fall into the sea. Hannibal survives the plunge, but Will was not so fortunate. In a constant state of melancholy, Hannibal mourns the loss. However, the tides will shift once an unexpected stranger appears.

June 24th excerpt:

“You okay?” John called softly, opening the door a crack to peer in at the small person within.

Caught off guard by the unexpected flood of light, Dean stumbled to his feet, one arm half-raised in defense with his other hand diving for his knife. Years of instincts developed from his current size had combined with the wariness he’d learned from his father, putting him constantly on edge and ready to act at a moment’s notice.

Realizing who was there, Dean’s eyes narrowed and he felt the tension leave his back. It was just John, and he meant well, despite how startling he could be.

Alright Guys

Yo can I just give a big shout out to my boy Alan Cumming, now some of you might be like whooooo??? but you’ll probably know him as the villain in Spy Kids  

or if not then he’s in the Good Wife and Nightcrawler in the older X-Men films. 

Now Alan Cumming is bisexual and totally open about it and has been for a long time, since the 90s, back when bisexuality was far less readily talked about than it is today (not saying there isn’t still huge bi erasure problems but back then they were way worse) so he was one of the few people publicly standing up for bisexual people back then which is super cool plus he’s done loads of work for AIDS charities and GLAAD so I reckon he’s a pretty awesome guy.

Now on CBS this fall there’s gonna be a show starring Mr Cumming called Instinct, it’s gonna be about a normal guy who’s a teacher but used to be a CIA Officer so now has to fight bad guys while trying to keep up with his normal life. The uber cool thing about this is that the main characters gonna have a husband and they’ll be trying to adopt kids and do cool things so this is gonna be the FIRST EVER Network Drama where the main character’s gay. 

How cool’s THAT?

So basically what I’m saying is let’s build the hype and get this show super successful so network execs will see that LGBT shows can have high ratings and be mega profitable :D

Addition to the "humans are weird"/space orcs

The Human ability to survive even in horrible circumstances is uncanny. There are thousands of stories out there of humans after a disaster who are presumed dead only to have them stumble into town a few days later or people who survived on the open ocean for days or weeks.

This completely puzzles aliens. Their own kind has nearly a low chance of survival if they are in any physically stressful circumstances. It is not uncommon for certain species to voluntarily leave a group if they know they have a low chance of survival. Because of this most alien species have do not have a great will to live in the face of difficulty. Since this is common in space, people don’t really think about it much when they abandon someone who is slowing them down.
So when their human counterparts race out of safety to save one of their crew even as the ship around them is being blown to pieces, they all flip out. They can’t understand why someone in peak physical condition would risk harm to save someone who is probably already dead.
When the human comes back, carrying the lost crew member in their arms, and stumbles onto the escape pod just before the doors closed all of them are in shock.
Humans quickly become the heroic/stupid species. Stories pile up of their strange fascination of saving others just before death. Some of the more survival driven species begin to pick up on it and try saving their own too.

But unfortunately there is more than one story of aliens leaving a human behind, thinking them dead, only to be hunted down by the human who had to cut off their own arm before signaling another ship to pick them up and take them to a space hospital. The human’s old crew all get pummeled by the human as soon as he finds them. Each of them gets a good black eye from the human’s cybernetic arm

anonymous asked:

hey there! thanks for answering all our questions on this blog + how possible would it for someone to crack ribs with a solid kick? there's a character i have in mind that's escaping captivity, but they're also young, so i'm not quite sure how easily they'd be able to hurt the (adult) antagonist in such a manner, especially lacking any fighting experience to begin with?

Well, you can break someone’s ribs with a kick. That’s the entire purpose of the roundhouse, especially the version where you strike with the ball of the foot rather than the top of the foot. (And… aren’t like me when I was seven or eight, when I was new to sparring and totally stubbed my toe in another kid’s side at a tournament after my brain/body got confused between the two. I didn’t break my toe, but I could’ve.)

That story above is important, by the way. If you’ve got a character who doesn’t know how to fight then they’re not even going to get that far. If you don’t know how to kick then that’s a great way to get your leg caught by someone who knows what they’re doing. They catch the foot by the ankle, and then drag you wherever they want. That’s assuming the character can get their leg up and out without falling over. Even if they do manage that, say because they’ve watched a lot of martial arts flicks, they won’t know how to generate power and will be very slow. A, B, and C occur anyway. Your protagonist is going to end up back wherever they were being kept, this time in a much less comfortable position.

Even for an experienced martial artist, kicks require fairly constant bodily upkeep in order to be able to do them cold (much less perform them at all). That’s not a combat scenario, that’s just in general. You’ve got a great chance of pulling all the leg muscles you need to get away, including ones you didn’t realize you had and that’s if you don’t break your toes. Board breaks with the roundhouse kick are the most terrifying of them all because you’ve got to remember to curl your toes just right in order to carry your foot through the board.

Kicks are off the table.

More importantly, this is an exact rendition of the “Feel Good Violence” trope: My Instincts Performed A Wheel Kick.

The protagonist is suddenly and randomly enough good at fighting to not only fight, but win when making their first attempt at a violent altercation. They use techniques which require a fairly high level of dedication and aptitude out of “natural ability” and “instinct”.

Unless you’ve got an ironclad reason for invoking the trope (past lives/ immortality/memory loss/the matrix) it will undercut your narrative credibility in ways the story cannot recover from.

When you’ve cracked your foundation, you’re done.

“The only difference between reality and fiction is that fiction needs to be credible,” - Mark Twain

Narrative integrity is based on the rules or limitations we’ve set for ourselves, those limitations are the ironclad rules by which the narrative functions. They exist on two levels: in behavior and actions of characters within the world, and on a secondary level the setting’s behavior around them. Everything in your story must be working to uphold the fiction. When it doesn’t the audience’s “suspension of disbelief” starts to crack. You are beholden to the rules and limitations set down by your setting. Without them, you have no story.

When you’re setting out to create a character, there are four questions you should ask yourself:

1) What can the character do?

2) What can’t the character do?

3) What is the character willing to do but can’t?

4) What can the character do, but is unwilling to?

Within these four circles you have your character, their ethics/morals, and their limitations. That is the box you’ve created for yourself. It is important to own it and abide by it. When dealing with a protagonist, those limitations are not just the foundations of a character but the entire narrative.

Your character cannot fight your antagonist in a one on one and come away with any victory because you have established they don’t know how to. That is a limitation you set for yourself. That the audience knows and understands, so they will expect this character to act in accordance with it. They may want to walk up to the antagonist and kick them in the ribs so hard those ribs break, but they can’t. That desire could be a driving force behind them learning to fight later. As of now, though, their powerlessness in active violent conflict serves to reinforce the antagonist’s position. Reinforcing the antagonist’s position is for the narrative good.

They should be making choices based on the Venn diagram’s center: when what they can do meets what they are willing to do.

If what they can’t do conflicts with what they’re willing to do and they go with it anyway then the result is a failed escape attempt. A captive’s survival is based on their value. If they’re valuable enough for the antagonist to go through the trouble of capturing them in the first place, then they’re probably not going to be killed. At least, not until their value runs through. They lose and wind up back in captivity under more scrutiny, more security, and with fewer exit options. This reminds us why they were captured in the first place, and reinforces our villain’s position.

A protagonist can fail and retain their legitimacy many more times than an antagonist can. While this is a perfectly legitimate narrative outcome, I don’t think its the one you’re looking for.

This is the second issue with your question:

A narrative’s antagonist is its backbone.

Your antagonist is one of the most important pieces of your story, if not the most. They are the lingering threat, the shadow hovering over the story, and the knife at your protagonist’s throat. They are seventy percent threat, and the last thirty relies on their ability to make good on it.

One of the biggest mistakes an author can make is assuming their antagonist’s position in their narrative and the threat they provide are impervious to harm.

Unlike your protagonist, your antagonist is always in a precarious position. They must constantly re-affirm themselves and the threat they represent through their actions. That threat is all consuming and when challenged, it must either be defeated or confirmed.

If defeated, then the threat is gone.

If confirmed, then the threat level is heightened because now we imagine what they might do next.

An antagonist can re-affirm themselves after a defeat, but they’ve got to double down on their effort and create a new threat rather than relying on their old one. You as the author must work harder to make up for what you lost, and even then you’ll never have the initial fear ever again.

The first rule of the antagonist is: your capital is limited, so spend it wisely.

When you undercut an antagonist in favor of the protagonist before its necessary, you damage the antagonist’s credibility and, subsequently, their position in the story. When you lose your antagonist, you lose most of your narrative tension.

A character who doesn’t know how to do something is applying a limitation to the character. You are applying a restriction to what they can and can’t do. If you’re character doesn’t know how to fight, then fighting will be off the table. More importantly, having your character succeed at a skill set they have no experience in doesn’t make them “awesome” or “cool”, it means instead that the other characters who put time and effort into honing these skills suck.

When those characters are your antagonists… that hurts.

If you’ve got a protagonist with no hacking experience who manages to overcome a supposedly great hacker on their first or second go round with no time spent learning how to hack, then who looks bad? The second hacker. They’re the ones who are supposed to be good at hacking. If the narrative hinges on them being a major antagonist, then the author just shot their narrative in the foot.

Combat skills are the same way. They’re a skill set, not an instinct. They don’t come naturally, and take a great deal of time and effort to hone.

If your goal is to show your dangerous antagonist is a bumbling moron when an untrained teenager gets a lucky shot so miraculous they manage to lay them up for the rest of the story, then that’s a job well done.

If your goal is for the antagonist to maintain their credibility within the narrative? Don’t use them for a punching bag.

Violent confrontation is based just as much on threat of force as it is on the follow through. The threat is usually more frightening than what follows, and your protagonist is already challenging the fear by trying to escape. From a narrative perspective, if they get over their fear enough to challenge their antagonist directly then it’s game over. You spent your all capital either at the beginning or midway through the story, and you’re not getting it back.

Remember, your antagonist has to do just as much work to earn their street cred as your protagonist. Their position is a delicate balance of power management and threat of force. They rely on show over tell. They need to live up to whatever it is you’ve been saying about them. They need to be as dangerous as they’ve been puffed up to be, unless their reputation itself is the real antagonist. Never forget, your antagonist (whoever they are/whatever it is) is the backbone of your story. They are often the driving force of action, the reason why the protagonist is struggling, and the focal point. In some ways, they are more important than your protagonist because without them the protagonist’s got a whole lot of nothing.

When you undercut your antagonist, you also hurt your protagonist’s development. You cheat them of their chance for growth, and deny them their ability to show off whatever it is that they’re actually good at i.e. using their bravery, intelligence, and cleverness to sneak out.

If your protagonist beats down their Goliath at the beginning of (or even the middle) of the story then there’s no reason for them to go to the mountain master and learn to throw rocks.

-Michi

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