instead of reading books for school

anonymous asked:

Momoi acting like a big sister to Murasakibara and basically babying him? I feel like in Teiko Momoi took care of him a lot. Please make it in high school setting~

The package he had received had been filled with frilly pink squiggles of paper instead of packing peanuts. It didn’t take a genius to figure out who had sent it, despite the return address being blocked out so he couldn’t send it back. Inside, boxes upon boxes of healthy snacks and quick books to read were stacked onto one another. Reaching in, Murasakibara pulled out the first thing his hand bumped into.

“These are gross,” he grumbled, nose wrinkling at the sight of a snack he already knew he hated.

His cell phone ringing on top of his desk caught his attention. It wasn’t hard for him to simply reach over and pick it up from its spot. Though, from what the caller ID was telling him, he wasn’t sure he wanted to talk with the person on the other end of the line.

“Hello,” he answered when it was close to its final ring, voice hesitant.

“Mukkun, did you recieve the gifts I sent yet?”

Momoi sounded chipper as ever and, if he closed his eyes, Murasakibara swore he could see her smiling face. His affirmative grunt was met with a squeal of delight and it almost made him reach for the button that would end the call immediately.

“I’m so glad,” she said, sounding relieved. “I wasn’t sure if your school would allow those kinds of things to be sent.”

They really shouldn’t have, Murasakibara thought to himself, but he couldn’t get a word in edgewise as Momoi continued to ramble.

“They’re supposed to be really good for you, so eat them, okay? I know you like your snacks, but you can’t eat that junk all the time.” At this point, Momoi was starting to sound like a scolding mother. “And read a little more instead of lying around all the time! I got you some books I think you’ll like too.”

She continued to chatter until a few hours later, her constant string of words practically making Murasakibara’s ear sore. When she finally said she had to go, he could’ve groaned in thanks, but held back the noise.

“I’ll talk to you another time, Mukkun. Keep an eye out for another package.” And then she hung up.

Leaning his head back against his mattress, Murasakibara groaned. Suddenly, he felt like he was back in Teiko where Momoi would constantly badger him about doing things to improve himself.

A small smile met his lips. At least some things didn’t change.

We Got Married (M)

Originally posted by kthmyg

8.8k words. Arranged Marriage AU. Min Yoongi.

Warning: Fingering. Phone sex. ft Kim Namjoon.


It’s hilarious, laughable, pathetic even, how love could either build you or ruin you and yet knowing this, people still chase after it like the rise of golden light beyond the horizon, or the last drop of dew in twilight, or the flutter of that one coral blue butterflies in buttercup paved meadow.

It’s frightening, daunting, startling even, how love makes your hands clammy like you’re being interviewed by the very man who founded the big shot company you’ve applied to.

And it’s utterly, impossibly, unbelievable how love comes in many ways like a bump and a spill of coffee on crisp white shirt, or a brush of hands upon a dusty leather brown book spine or an envelope obtained from a mailbox on one’s way back from grocery shopping.

Well, that’s exactly what’s happening to Min Yoongi, second son to one of the well-known elite families in Seoul. Most of the time, he couldn’t care less about family matters; business deals, dinner with alien faces and empty conversations─ those things he’s entitled to attend with mildly bored eyes and champagne he’ll never finish in one hand. But this particular matter, he can’t just not care. One, because it directly concerns him (as if the cursive letter of his name engraved in bold black against crisp white isn’t enough indication). Two, because it’s from a certain someone in his family who he’s fond of.

Dear Yoongi,

Is written on the top of the not so neat written paper.

Son,

I know you might hate me for this.

Keep reading

Friendly reminder that fanfiction is amazing and if you read that instead of regular books, it isn’t really a bad thing.

Let me break it down for you. Fanfiction writers with pro writing and editing skills and amazingly imaginative minds are popping up everywhere now. I’ve seen fanfics so good I could hardly believe it was just a fanfic. For big fandoms like supernatural, voltron, Sherlock, Dan and Phil (the phandom), etc, I’ve seen tons of good fanfic. For smaller fandoms, very little but for most, there’s at the very least one good fanfic/a good writer who plans to write fanfic for it.

If people shame you for reading fanfic, don’t get discouraged. Fanfic is often times a great source of writing knowledge or education. I’ve learned more from reading fanfic than I have published books (also a lot of published books started out as fanfic anyways)

Also, for some people, reading published books isn’t their thing. Like me for instance; I’ve enjoyed a book before, but I don’t normally pick up a book and start reading it. It’s actually pretty difficult to get me to read books. But, you give me a well written fanfic and I’ll be all over that quicker than you can blink.

My writing skills have improved from reading fanfic. In fact, not only have I seen different writing styles, I’ve seen different writing formats, learned new words, learned about character development, learned more realism in how someone would react to something than I could from any published book, and so much more. Not only that, but it’s hard, if not almost impossible, to find a good book that satisfies all my needs as far as plot/genre, lgbt representation, characters, etc.

So guyyyssss. Just because you read fanfic doesn’t mean you aren’t reading “real stories” or aren’t reading “the correct stories”. If you are a middle school or high school student who has to read books for a grade, yeah. Maybe you won’t get a grade for it, but reading it on the side is okay. If you are an adult or kid who gets made fun of for reading fanfic instead of real books, to hell with the haters. Fanfic is awesome. And the cool part is, it’s easy to find. It’s loaded with good writers. And the best part; it’s uncensored by mainstream media. You don’t work for a company that has you write stuff for the mass when you write fanfic. You write it for fun because you can. Which means you can make it whatever you want (which is honestly probably why I like it better).

So go out there and read your fanfiction. It’s freaking amazing.

Babygirl

Summary: Dan is an innocent virgin and Phil is the bad-boy who likes to make him flustered. High school Pastel!Dan and Punk!Phil AU

Genre: Smut that’s kinda kinky but mostly cute

Word count: 4,039

Kinks: Feminization, daddy kink, dirty talk, a little verbal humiliation

You can also read on AO3 here.

Keep reading

i. write a to-do list and prioritize it.

whether it be in an agenda book/planner, bullet journal, or your phone, you’ll need to write tasks down so you don’t forget and not have to backtrack! then, find a way to prioritize your tasks, typically i organize it by subject and then by urgency using stars to indicate how important it is. however, find a priority system that works for you the best and stick with it! once you do that, reorganize your to-do list in order of priority and you can start going down the list.

ii. know your constants.

constants are things that usually happen every day. constants include sleeping, eating, classes, extracurriculars, jobs, etc. write down all the times you have to do these things/want to do these things, so you can take it into account when scheduling other tasks. for instance, if you know that an extracurricular will keep you an extra hour away from home, organize ways to do your homework in school (i.e. at lunch) or know that you might have to sacrifice a task or two to keep yourself on schedule.

iii. be mindful of limits and events.

it’s okay to say “yes” to hang out with your friends and opportunities. but if you know it’ll feel more like a burden, if you have something important to study for, and ultimately if you’ll be more stressed out if you go — then say no. make sure that you can handle taking some time out if you say yes! when you add events that you say yes to, incorporate it into planning and treat it as a constant, because most likely that plan won’t change much in terms of time. appointments with doctors or dentists should also be treated like constants as well! (don’t let school consume you entirely but also hold yourself back if you know you need to study/prepare.)

iv. set specific times for each task & learn to adapt!

if you don’t tell yourself when to begin and when to end, you’ll never get to either place, and you won’t be as organized or as motivated to finish on time. think about how much time it will take you to complete a task, and give yourself at most a half hour extra–just in case something unforeseen comes into play, it won’t shift your entire schedule. write these times down next to the things on your list. set alarms if you want to! keep in mind that you’ll probably need to move tasks to the next day, so you’ll need to adapt accordingly.

make sure to check off tasks as you go so you know that you completed it. it’ll make you more productive seeing your progress too!

v. create study times.

try your best to organize regular studying time into your schedule. even if it’s just for an hour or two to brush up on one or two subjects, studying regularly will keep the information in your head. make sure to find room for extra time to study the subject you have the hardest time on. add more study time as you get closer to the date of a quiz/test/exam, too!

vi. use deadlines to your advantage.

always set deadlines two days early (or earlier). getting ahead of deadlines will help you relax in the end and procrastination won’t be as harsh. plus, it gives you more time to tweak an essay, practice a presentation, etc. if you have it done earlier — not to say that you shouldn’t have already done this prior to your created deadline! especially for projects or essays, try and break up tasks into even smaller tasks so you know the exact steps you need to take. for instance, instead of saying “Work on English essay,” split it into “Research for essay,” “Outline essay,” “Write intro paragraph,” etc., and make sure you have specific deadlines for those too so you don’t leave all those small tasks to the last minute.

vii. take a break!

if you don’t take breaks, you’ll end up burning out. even though school may seem in priority, you are always the number one priority. if you don’t feel well physically or mentally, then give yourself some time to relax. read a book, take a bath–whatever helps you destress. i always try and take a break for a half-hour in between long work sessions, and shorter breaks in between a couple of shorter tasks. sometimes, i use the pomodoro method! insert breaks into your schedule so you have some time to yourself. during one of these breaks, you can do something as simple as organizing your desk if it’s a mess to keep yourself productive and relieve some stress if a clean study space is required for you to be motivated and focused. you can also exercise, drink water, or get up and walk around a bit during these breaks too!

viii. get some sleep.

Sleep is important. The average teenager needs about nine hours of sleep, and in general, adults need seven to nine hours. Figure out when you want to wake up in the morning, and count back the hours. Try and start to unwind (stop doing work, get ready for bed) about a half an hour before you sleep. Read a book, check social media briefly–just something that lets you relax and eases you into sleep. Waking up, set a few sets of alarms to go off anywhere in 10-20 minute intervals, just in case you don’t wake up or to start waking you up sooner so you’re actually awake by the time you want to and your body is less drowsy.

ix. focus on the task.

- put a clock in front of you so you are aware of the time you’re spending! a calendar would also be useful to help visualize your deadlines.

- put your phone on airplane mode, do not disturb, turn it off, etc. and put it on the other side of the room so you can focus on the tasks at hand. personally, i use bluetooth headphones so i can listen to music from my phone while it’s away and so i don’t have to break out my laptop which is full of distractions.

- take note of how much time is lost due to deviating from a task so you realize what distracts you and how to remove yourself from those distractions.

- sit down with all the materials you’ll need for studying before beginning so you won’t interrupt your focus looking for a notebook.

good luck and get to work!

+ more resources

confession time, here’s what i got

Summary: In which Otabek and Yuri pine for each other a lot, and manage to drag other people into their own problems. (otayuri week day 1! prompt: confessions, otayuri, side pairings viktuuri and saramila, word count: 4095)


Otabek figures out that he loves Yuri when he is twenty-one.

It’s during Yuri’s nineteenth birthday, too. His plane lands exactly at midnight, and he’s rushing to get his baggage as quick as he can to meet his best friend. He sees him the moment he claims baggage – it isn’t hard to miss his long hair or his leopard jacket – and he stretches his arms out as Yuri bolts over to him.

In the next minute, he has him in his arms, and he hears a cheerful, “Beka!” in his ears, and, oh, he realizes. He is in love.

Keep reading

Cold As Ice

Originally posted by v-writings

Peter Parker x Shy Reader

Request: Yes

Summary: After discovering their powers and wanting to save a troubled citizen, the Reader is left to dealt with the consequences, but ends up finding out a certain secret from a certain spiderling instead.

Word Count: 3,180 (omg)

Warnings: Language, cuteness, discovery of powers, fluff, fight scene, shy!Reader, *slight* assault scene, suck-ass ending (bc I’m trash and I suck at writing), (Please let me know if I missed anything).

A/N: For some reason, I had such a hard time making a summary for this ?? Hopefully the anon that requested this thinks it’s okay. :// I’m slowly moving through all my requests (I have a lot lol). Anyway, let me know what you think as always and enjoy reading!


Walking into Midtown High, you cautiously grudge towards your locker in order to get your books for today’s classes.

These past few days have been strange, to say the least.

Despite it being almost the end of the school year and the hot weather finally arriving, you somehow felt cold to your bones.

Instead of wearing short sleeves and shorts, you started dressing in sweatshirts and pants.

Maybe I’m getting sick…?

Maybe it’s just the chills…?

You kept making excuses like that, but the coldness never seemed to go away.

It’s been happening for a couple weeks now, but you didn’t know what to do.

You didn’t know what this was.

Well, not until today.

Keep reading

2

Do you ever find yourself wishing for a different life? That you weren’t just a kid going through school, or a young adult trying to work out what to do, or a person stuck in a job? But instead, someone with a mission, a calling to go on an adventure bigger than the life we know? Do you ever read books or watch movies about ancient history or sci-fi futures and wish that you were there instead of our boring time?

i’ve read a lot of dystopian novels and I’m pretty sure the most truly terrifying one has been the dystopia of A Series of Unfortunate Events

you know the one where:

  • everyone is an idiot but three children
  • no one gives a shit about kids. like, where the fuck is Child Protective Services?
  • They’re allowed to stay in a horrible and dirty and broken down mansion only given one bed, no crib for Sunny.
  • They’re put into the care of an asshole that (instead of like sending them to school or something) sent them to work in a fucking lumber mill
  • the principal that makes kids sleep in an ugly, moldy, crab infested shack and lets a cultural appropriating gym teacher literally torture two students and one assistant.
  • There’s a village that just gets to ?? burn people alive ???? mainly just because they’re bored
  • after being tortured and stalked and harassed by Olaf, they’re framed for his murder and treated worse and more harshly than Olaf ever has.
  • the hospital that still lets people watch live surgeries on unconscious little girls ????? with rusty fucken knives ????????
  • and the carnival full of people who get their kicks watching freaks get fed to lions ????

i’m sure there’s more but i’m tired

The morning after her father died, the first thing Laura saw upon waking was Bobby, curled up around his Wolverine doll–the one that he’d carried out of the lab, through a sewer, bundled into the fake bottom of a crate in the back of a truck, up the 5, across the deserts of Utah, the Rockies, and the long flat north that came after. He had carried it through these woods, through this fight and this flight, and there he was sleeping, pudgy hands curled close around it.

Laura had read the comics Gabriela and the other nurses had brought in for them. They had been assigned to learn how to read briefs, maps, instruments, but Gabriela had brought Laura comics about heroes.

In the lab, they had taught Delilah how to drag poison from green veins, how to find the sharpest edge at her beck and call, to strangle. The day before, Delilah had shredded the life out of men with a screaming rain of pine needles. She had wrapped long grasses around Rhodes’s ugly bolo tie and dragged him down and down. But that next day, that dawning day, Laura woke up to see Delilah calling small yellow apples down from a tree blooming out of season.

It had been a story in a comic book, Eden. It had been fiction, a fantasy, a dream, a random set of coordinates. Logan had suspected they would find nothing when they got there. He had been sure.

Sometimes promises are fiction. Sometimes they’re written on the backs of twice-folded photographs. Sometimes the nurse with the steadiest hands whispers to you in the middle of the night come with me child, wake up child, curl up in this duffel bag, stay quiet child, believe me child, we’re going, we’re going, I’ll get you somewhere safe.

Laura had curled up in that fabric-walled darkness, clutching her backpack to her chest. She had her ball, the paperwork that was her life writ out, two battered comic books. A photograph with a list of whispered names. They were not supposed to have names any more than they were supposed to have birthdays or comic books or childhoods.

Kind hands were waiting for them at the end of this journey. There was refuge. There were new names, visas and school where no one should bleed for anything except loose teeth and ignored blisters.

Logan had scoffed, and Laura hadn’t listened. She had said her friends’ names over and over. He had pointed to coordinates in a comic book, and she had said her family’s names over and over. She knew, the way Logan never did, the way Logan never would, that some days stories save you. Sometimes a nurse calls you child instead of by number, and gives you flimsy precious pages to read in the dark.

They knew the comic books were comic books. Laura knew, before she ever met Logan and his smelly, hopeless self, that the X-Men were no gods among men. Flimsy pages—she understood flimsy. She understood the way things tore–pages, clothing, skin and ligaments.

But sometimes you can make the story real. “Eden,” they said. They pressed the coordinates hand to hand, whisper to whisper, and they ran. They promised each other, and they found each other there, at coordinates that had been nothing until they made them a waystation, a place to rest. A watchtower.

Laura had carried so little out of that lab. She had the metal that lined her bones. She had her family’s names. She had a set of coordinates in a battered old comic, and she would carry that forever. It wasn’t real, but she was. It wasn’t real, that Eden, that haven, but she had been there.

She had run shrieking into Rictor’s arms. She had cried on Bobby and danced around the hard cracked dirt with him, each swinging the other in wide circles. Logan had slept safe there for the last time. She would carry it forever. Fading, flimsy pages. A tired man with a funny beard.

They would go next over shallow valleys and dry rocky peaks. Delilah would hunt down a deer in the woods, walking silent on fallen leaves and little sprouts, calling death down green and blooming. Rebecca would cook it up over the fire Bobby raised from sparks, and Laura would lie on her back with her hands on her full rounded belly and pretend she was a lion. When they came down from the mountains, the wide low fields would roll out below them for miles. There would be so much sky.

But for now, in this morning, this dawning day–there was a little boy in a wood, who was the safest he’d ever been. There was a little boy in a wood, with a yellow Wolverine doll held to his chest and Laura sat there in the waking light, watching him breathe.

Actual Quotes from my Dad (An English Teacher)
  • Dad: Why the hell did you put a comma there?
  • Dad: Do you even know what a participial phrase is?
  • Dad: Omg. He's like my favorite character of all time.
  • Dad: Who should I dress up as for the movie premier?
  • Dad: Hey are you awak? I know it's late, but you read Animal Farm, right? Yeah. I need you to read this report. I can't tell if I am just super tired or if this is actual bullshit.
  • Dad: Alesha wouldn't be able to spell 'definitely' right if wrote it down for her. She would fucking erase it and then write 'defiantly', because she doesn't care. I hate her.
  • Dad: I need you to bake brownies. I lost a bet.
  • Dad: Omg. You cannot ship me with Gilcher. You know I don't like tattoos and he's like twenty-five. And for Christ's sake, he teaches math.
  • Dad: Omg. Gilcher said the funniest thing today.
  • Dad: Mrs. Ashworth and I have decided to start a band. It'll be called Great Expectations.
  • Dad: It's like you didn't read the fucking book.
  • Dad: Okay. So this week you're reading this book I stole from Mrs. Ashworth's. It's like sixty pages long, but you'll love it.
  • Dad: *puts books on my bed for me to read everyday and demands that I read them*
  • Dad: My son doesn't like reading. I have not only failed him, but society. You aren't my son. Leave.
  • Dad: Okay. So you're getting books for Christmas. All of you. I get discounts on them since I'm a teacher, and since I'm a teacher, it's all I can afford, so...
  • Dad: Fucking standardized testing can go fuck itself in the ass.
  • Dad: I have to teach for the required testing instead of what they really need to know.
  • Dad: Fuck the government.
  • Dad: Fuck the school board.
  • Dad: Close the door.
  • Dad: Charles Dickens was so fucking pretentious, and I hate him, but he also caused change, but he's such a Dick. Ha. DICKens.
  • Dad: I love puns.
  • Dad: People who say sarcasm is the lowest form of humor are assholes.
  • Dad: Please shut up.
  • Dad: Catching Fire was the worst book but the best movie and that feels weird.
  • Dad: I wouldn't get so mad when you call me at school if you didn't change your ringtones to inappropriate rap music.
  • Dad: I fucking hate Alesha. She asked what countries were apart of Austria-Hungary today and I almost told her to get out.
  • Dad: You cannot visit my school in a dress that short. There are boys there.
  • Dad: Barbra Parks is fucking Queen.
  • Dad: I need you to make me a good, relaxing playlist for silent reading. I'm too lazy.
  • Dad: If I have to watch two of my students grind on each other at one more dance, I will kill them both.
  • Dad: They act like I care what they think.
  • Dad: I hate homework.
  • Dad: I have decided to become a politician.
  • Dad: What's the one book with the guys and the one kills the other and the chick without a name who dies and the short angry man? Mouseman? Oh my fucking gosh. Of Mice and Men. I have failed.
60 Tips for IB - from a 45 pointer

A lot of people have been asking me about general tips for surviving IB and how I got 45 points. If I’m honest I think the difference between 40 and 45 points is just pure, dumb luck, but at least here are some tips to getting up to the 40 -points level :D

This is a list of tips my friend and I wrote right after our IB exams. We were feeling quite high at the moment, so I had to edit some of the tips so you could actually take the advice seriously…

1. HAPPINESS FIRST DO WHATEVER YOU CAN TO KEEP YOURSELF HAPPY

2. Don’t do “homework” at home!!!

3. Find a study buddy

4. Proceed to ignore everyone but your study buddy

5. Not your dog though

6. Escape from your family / responsibilities (e.g. do your homework abroad, in someone else’s basement, coffee shops, libraries, group rooms at school, sneak into university study halls etcetc. The possibilities are endless)

7. Set yourself a time limit for doing the TOK Essay. (Don’t do it two weekends in a row, you will go crazy)

8. Don’t attempt to finish the EE in one day

9. Remind your science teacher about the IA. It’s for your own good.

10. Whether it’s 5am or 2am, figure out when you work best and stick to it.

11. Don’t think you’ll learn stuff in class. Seriously. Read the books instead, and use classes as revision / sleep time / relaxing time.

12. Mark schemes will be your best teacher. 

13. Write syllabus notes FROM THE VERY START.

14. You won’t understand TOK but at least try to have fun with it.

15. Don’t forget about CAS, but don’t spend too much time on it either.

16. Install “StayFocusd” but don’t go nuclear option for a week

17. Memorize the opening hours of the public study areas in your vicinity 

18. Listen to Christmas music if you’re sad

19. Get a whiteboard for revision

20. Physics students: buy the Tsokos revision guide

21. Chemistry students: YouTube Richard Thornley 

22. Biology students: YouTube Alex Lee

23. Read the language books during the summer

24. Don’t give a fuck about English B…but TAKE ENGLISH B IF YOU CAN

25. Don’t choose science as your EE subject (unless you have a super smart and helpful and amazing supervisor)

26. Love your teachers, see them as your friend. They’re adorable.

27. Love yourself too

28. Making a plan (without necessarily following it) will help calm you down

29. 8tracks have amazing playlists

30. Dictionaries are cool

31. Thesaurus.com is cooler

32. Watch TV shows all year round to get your mind off things, just not season finales right before the exams

33. Cry it out

34. Shout it out

35. Drink it out

36. Just don’t get too drunk or violent that’s bad

37. Your nerdy classmates are your friends and teachers

38. Bring coffee / tea to school, if you make it to school

39. It’s OK to skip school for school

40. Waste money on school shit, you’ll earn it back in the future

41. If you can afford it, go to Lanterna summer course. You might get friends from other countries who’ll be able to help you throughout the year, by exchanging resources etc.

42. Make puns about nerdy stuff (like, about life, the universe and everything)

43. Be proud of being a nerd, everyone knows it already

44. EAT

45. SLEEP (sometimes it’s worth skipping school for)

46. Some teachers are nice about students sleeping in class

47. Concentrate when doing IA experiments though, take notes, or even better: film it

48. By the way, FILMING can reduce a lot of errors in science experiments. Write that as an improvement in your evaluation part!!

49. Question banks can be found, if you know where to look

50. Don’t care about other people’s grades

51. Don’t care too much about your own grades either. You’ll survive either way. Calm down. “Chillax”. 

52. Don’t do TOK presentation alone.

53. WHAT DOESN’T KILL YOU MAKES YOU STRONGER (uni will be a piece of cake for you. also u can puke out a 4-paged-essay, proof-read and everything, in less than an hour, handwritten. amazing)

54. IB therefore I BS

55. Decorate your wall with IB gems

56. You’ll learn a lot from teaching others / making up games / doing past papers. Don’t just read books and highlight. Don’t just listen to the teachers. You won’t remember shit that way.

57. I repeat, DON’T JUST TRUST THE CLASSES, READ THE EFFING BOOKS

58. You’re allowed to protest sometimes

59. Don’t think too much about TOK / the uncertainty principle / relativity / astrophysics / DNA / nihilist bullshit from the language books. Stick to your reality and be happy. Have fun. Enjoy life. Stop giving so much fucks. Lower your expectations. (I honestly spent IB preparing to fail and start a bakery or something. Life is full of pleasant surprises that way)

60. Your Non-IB friends will laugh at you. Your siblings will laugh at you. Your teachers will laugh at you. You will laugh at you. But it’s okay, 2 years will be over in a flash ^^

Study moods
  • Productive procrastination: having an essay due in a couple of days but reluctantly chooses to do homework instead.
  • Early bird: waking up at 6am and having a nice study session before school starts.
  • Late owl: stays up late to finish that one essay you procrastinated doing earlier.
  • In through one ear and out the other: reading the same paragraph five times and still wondering what it's about.
  • Slow but steady: when I make slow progress but I'm very proud of myself.
  • I don't want to: laying on your bed and continuously thinking that you will start studying in five minutes. Alternatively you stare at your book for a prolonged period of time.
  • The master of the free period: the times that you have a snack and a nice spot in the library and just study.

1/22 ▪ I wish I was reading this book instead of reading my stats textbook. I don’t let myself read books for pleasure during the school year because I would never be able to stop and never get anything done.

hey guys! my last semester of high school starts tomorrow and i thought i could make a quick lil masterpost on how to take on your next semester head-on and how to start off strong.

1. start off organized (whatever organized means to you)

  • one thing i tried this year was keeping a folder for all of my school papers and it helped me a lot instead of just putting my papers in one designated spot like previous years. keeping one folder (or one folder per subject) can help you keep track of all of your papers. 
  • if you need tips on how to stay organized, check out my masterpost here :)

2. try to have a positive mindset

  • although i’m kind of loathing going back to school, you have to try and find the positives in going back! and it doesn’t have to be academic, my positive thought about school is that i’ll get to see my friends and read more cool books for Literature class. if you go into it with a negative mindset, school will be a drag and you won’t do your best.

3. make small progress on any long term assignments at the beginning

  • following this step should help relieve any stress about a long term project, especially one that you know is coming (ex. me with my quarter assignments for literature). making progress can range from starting to read the book early to just writing a sentence a day or somethin’. but you don’t want to get too caught up in this step that you forget about the work that is due the next day, or something of the sort. 

4. *mainly for seniors* if you have anything application related, do it asap.

  • i know that i have my CSF application due some time throughout the second semester and a couple scholarship items to complete, so i’m going to do them either during the break before the next semester or as early as possible in the next semester. doing this is very helpful and will help relieve any anticipation or stress. 

5. detox the weekend before you go back to school

  • personally, i try to refrain from doing anything school-related the weekend before school because you should just relax and prepare by being relaxed. take a bubble bath, watch a movie, hang with some friends, sleep, anything that makes you happy and relaxed. dunno what to do? i have some cute things here in my self care tag.

6. Have fun.

  • have a great time, don’t let school run your whole life.

i know this isn’t much but these are just my own little tips that i thought might help someone else. it sounds a lot like my Staying Organized masterpost, but most of that does overlap here. any masterpost recommendations? let me know and I will definitely take it into consideration. 

Other Masterposts:

surviving world history ap [x]

my guide to scholarships [x]

surviving finals [x]

how i take notes [x]

how i study for ap psychology [x]

staying organized [x]

ibookbuddies  asked:

hi can you please explain the drama going on in the booklr community? with the white cis male author that got a movie deal? I haven't heard abut anything about this???

Yesterday, Publisher’s Weekly (a huge book news site) posted an article written by Sue Corbett about Scott Bergstrom‘s book called The CrueltyLink.

The headline reads: “YA Debut Gets Six-Figure Deal, Sold to 16 Territories and Jerry Bruckheimer (Pirates of the Caribbean)” and you think, oh my goodness, good for him, his book took off after being picked up and it’s a huge deal.

The articles writer, Sue Corbett, descibes the books as “Bergstrom’s heroine is Gwendolyn Bloom, a Jewish, slightly overweight 17-year-old, who is transformed into a “lean warrior with hair dyed fire-engine red,” during her mission to rescue her father, a kidnapped diplomat. Her search takes her into Europe’s most dangerous slums, and into contact with gangsters, spies, and arms dealers.”

You can probably already hear several alarm bells. For one it sounds like the plot of all three Taken movies -  plus several other people pointed out it sounds exactly like The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova. For some reason, Ms. Corbett makes a giant negative connotation on both overweight (and some people say Jewish as well) to a positive “lean warrior” and for some reason red hair is also an important part of the heroines development. Because of course overweight girls can’t rescue their fathers - they have to completely physically transform themselves in order to become truly kick-ass.

Then it gets worse when Scott Begstrom says “The morality of the book is more complicated than a lot of YA so I wanted to try doing it on my own,” Bergstrom said. “In a lot of YA, the conflict takes place inside a walled garden, set up by outside adult forces. If you think of those stories as a metaphor for high school, they start to make a lot more sense, but that was one thing I wanted to depart from.” 

Bergstrom disses both the YA genre writers and his primary audience - which is primarily women and girls. Not only that, but he sounds like he’s literally never read a YA book in his life, let alone have any business writing one. This was I think the primary spark that caused the firestorm on twitter.

Then the article praises the story as being revolutionary and outstanding, basically the next best thing that happened to YA. So when white man writes a YA book about a hyper-violent teenage heroine people say it’s morally ambiguous instead of being a high-school metaphor– he’s revolutionizing the genre, gets a six figure book deal, sells to 16 countries, and a movie deal with the Pirates of Caribbean director.  Meanwhile, all the female authors who’ve literally created and up-kept YA for decades are still dismissed and side-lined and deemed unimportant and are constantly forced to defend their work and prove it’s worth simply because they are women.

The article finishes with Scott’s agent Tracy Adams  “thought that Gwen would get a lot of leeway from readers because of her mission’s goal. “She’s going to do whatever it takes to save her dad and that was good enough for me,” Adams said. “Kicking butt to save your dad is actually a lot easier for me to swallow than kids killing kids in The Hunger Games.”

Can you believe that this woman basically dismisses one of the most important YA novels of our decade by trivializing it? Literally what she’s saying is “the violence is our book is more palatable that the violence you’ll see in that one really popular YA… you might have heard of it”

So as you can tell, this got a lot of people - authors, readers, and bloggers very angry. Not even because of this instant, but because this shit happens all the time, and women writers are tired of being side-lined every single time a white man decides that he’s better at doing what women have been doing their entire lives while he haven’t even bothered to learn anything about the subject.

Kayla Whaley @PunkinOnWheels on twitter created the #MorallyComplicatedYA hastag on twitter in response so that people could not only respond to this but also give recommendations about morally complicated YA novels that already exist. 

I’ve also heard that people have read excerpts from the book ( @buttermybooks and @ladybookmad and @cresdarnels) have told me that this guy basically created a “I’m better than those other females” character and basically bashes the YA dystopias that already exist and their readers.

At this point, I’m not really angry with Bergstrom but with the publishers, who clearly decided that this guy - a debut author- is worth a six figure deal, rights in 16 territories, and a movie deal with a basic plot like “fat Jewish girl gets lean and red-haired when her diplomat father goes missing and she has to go to Europe to rescue him while beating up and meeting up bad guys”.

They’re showing us what they think they find valuable while ignoring the fact that this guy is literally insulting not only to the genre but the readers who love it as well.

According to one of the books the reason chekov became chief of security in the movies is because he was rejected from command school for being too immature but he still wanted to be in charge of people so he went to security school instead

One of my majors is english, so I do a lot of reading. Having to read an entire novel each week is rough, but it really helped me refine my annotating methods. Here is how I annotate fiction and nonfiction books! 

FICTION

1. MAKE USE OF THE BLANK PAGES IN THE FRONT OF THE BOOK 

I’m someone who has a lot of trouble with keeping track of characters, especially if there are a lot of them. To remedy this, I use one of the blank pages in the front of the book to make a list of each of the characters, and sometimes I’ll write something about them so I can place a name to a character. Here’s a quick example: 

2. USE HIGHLIGHTERS AND ASSIGN MEANING TO THE COLORS

If you aren’t someone who likes to actually write in the book, you can obviously use different colored post-its for this instead. I typically use three different colors when highlighting, and this is what the colors mean for me:

Pink - Character introductions: I use pink to highlight any time a character is introduced for the first time. You will often be asked to write about characters’ personalities, so this makes it easier to find descriptions of characters later. 

Green - Important plot points: I use green to highlight any important things that happen that I think I’ll need to look back at. 

Yellow - quotes: I use yellow for important quotes, or anything that is important but doesn’t fit any other category. 

Extra - Purple: After you finish reading a book, your teacher will usually point out important passages too. When this happens, I use purple to highlight those sections to denote that my professor found them important, because this probably means they’re worth talking about in an essay. 

3. WRITE A SUMMARY AT THE END OF EACH CHAPTER

To make sure you really understood what you just read, it is a good idea to write down a brief summary on the last page of the chapter. This helps with remembering what you read, and it also makes it much easier to go back and find events in the plot that you want to talk about.

4. POST-ITS FOR ESSAY IDEAS

I’ve pretty much had to write an essay on virtually every book I’ve had to read in both high school and college, so I’ve made a habit of using post it notes to bookmark pages with content that would be helpful in making arguments in an essay. Make a short note on the post it so you remember what point you were planning on making with that passage. *This is especially helpful for timed essays during which you’re allowed to use the book as a resource. That way, you can have essentially your entire argument planned out ahead of time. 

NONFICTION 

I use similar methods when annotating nonfiction, but instead of paying attention to plot points, I try to focus on main arguments and ideas. 

1. USE A BLANK PAGE FOR SUMMARIZING

Like with fiction, I like to use a blank page at the front of the book to summarize different sections of the book. This makes it easy to remember all the main ideas without having to flip back through the entire book.

2. HIGHLIGHTING AND WRITING

When I read nonfiction, I care much less about color-coding my annotations. I typically just use whatever I have around me at the time. What really matters about nonfiction is making sure you really understand the content, so I write down summaries in the margins on nearly every other page. 

As you can see, there’s a lot of different colors going on. They mean nothing. Honestly, my yellow highlighter was just going dead so I was going back and forth between that and my purple one. The red pen was the one I was using during my initial read-through, and the second time I read these pages, I just happened to have a blue pen, so don’t worry about the colors.

Anyway, what is really important about this is my short summaries in the margins. Doing this not only helps you dismantle the arguments being made, but it also forces you to become an active reader. 

3. ACTIVE READING

Like i just mentioned, engaging with the book by writing summaries frequently makes you an active reader. It is difficult to get anything out of a book if you aren’t actively engaging with the material, especially if it’s nonfiction. To fully understand the ideas being presented in the book, you need to find a way to actively engage with it. You can do this by using my ‘writing summaries in the margins’ method, or you can do whatever it is that makes you really focus on the content of the book. Anyone can zone out and look at words on a page, but if you want that A, you need to really dive into the book!