installation east

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EAST ASIAN MYTHOLOGY MEME:

[3/8] JAPANESE GODS AND GODDESSES | AMATERASU

Amaterasu [天照], Amaterasu-ōmikami or Ōhirume-no-muchi-no-kami is a part of the Japanese myth cycle and also a major deity of the Shinto religion. She is the goddess of the sun, but also of the universe. 

In Japanese mythology, Amaterasu, the goddess of the sun, is the sister of Susanoo, the god of storms and the sea, and of Tsukuyomi, the god of the moon. It was written that Amaterasu had painted the landscape with her siblings to create ancient Japan. She became the ruler of the sun and the heavens along with her brother, Tsukuyomi, the god of the moon and ruler of the night. Originally, Amaterasu shared the sky with Tsukuyomi, her husband and brother until, out of disgust, he killed the goddess of food, Uke Mochi. This killing upset Amaterasu, causing her to label Tsukuyomi an evil god and to split away from him; separating night from day.

There is also a long-standing rivalry between Amaterasu and her other brother, Susanoo. When he was to leave Heaven by orders of Izanagi, he went to bid his sister goodbye. Amaterasu was suspicious, but when Susanoo proposed a challenge to prove his sincerity, she accepted. Each of them took an object of the other’s and from it birthed gods and goddesses. Amaterasu birthed three women from Susanoo’s sword while he birthed five men from her necklace. Claiming the gods were hers because they were born of her necklace, she decided that she had won the challenge. The two were content for a time, but her brother became restless and went on a rampage, destroying Amaterasu’s rice fields, hurling a flayed pony at her loom, and killing one of her attendants in a fit of rage. Amaterasu, who was in fury and grief, hid inside the Ama-no-Iwato (“heavenly rock cave”), thus effectively hiding the sun for a long period of time. The world, without the illumination of the sun, became dark. The gods could not lure Amaterasu out of her hiding place until the goddess of dawn, Ame-no-Uzume, was able to trick her into reappearance.

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Yayoi Kusama (Japan, b. 1929). 

Infinity Mirror Room - Phalli’s Field. 1965 (1998). Sewn stuffed fabric, board, mirror room without ceiling. 250 x 455 x 455 cm. 

R. Castellane Gallery, New York.

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Where Were You When The Lights Went Out (2013)
Yemeni Artist SALWA ALERYANI

In this series, Salwa Aleryani collects electricity bills from her family and writes on them different verses from poems that reference light and darkness, literal or metaphorical, seeking to criticize the current blackouts and lack of electricity Yemen is experiencing at a time when they are producing more than sufficient energy resources. From this, she tries to understand how that darkness affects ones emotions and mental state, since one can predict that without electricity an individual is left in a state of active discovery rather than mere a routine. Even in darkness and stillness ones mind is always occupied with thoughts that allows them to reflect and ponder. In addition, she also tries to reflect on the value of those two outlets; electricity and poetry, and how much they shape our perceptions of darkness and guidance, if one is to think of light as guidance. In these two samples, the artist chose verses from Mahmoud Darwish(top and middle) and Wallace Stevens (bottom) .

Click on Images for Translation. 

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The Tomkins Square Park installation, 6th of May 2015

from finding the paper, to the help I got rolling it all up, today’s piece was very potent. A deep thank you to everyone that made it real.

Also, it’s important for me to note that every photo I take of other people is consensual- I make it a point to emphasize consent in all my social interactions.

別れの杯
アン・ボニー
別れの杯

「別れの杯」 (“The Parting Glass”)

手にした金なら使い果たした。気心の知れた仲間たちと
重ね続けた過ちは、巡り巡って報いを受けた

若きはずみの行いなど、思い出せない。今はもう
さあ、別れの杯を。さらば幸あれ。仲間たち

長く馴染んだ仲間たちは、みんな別れを惜しんでくれる
愛を語った恋人たちも、もう少しいてと望んでくれる

これが運命。仕方ないさ。旅に出るのは俺だけでいい
そっと別れを口にしよう。さらば、愛しき仲間たち

さらば幸あれ。仲間たち

(You might want to install the East Asian language pack on your computer if all you see are boxes.)