inscape

Inscape
Stateless
Inscape

Inscape By Stateless 

We wake with our forms all tangled up

Frozen in silence, no sound save breathing
I can feel your skin on my skin
How did it get so cold in here?

Like tears we fall on to the ice
We lay entangled, ice against skin


Sophia Bush’s Top Tips for Maintaining Balance When Life Gets Nuts

Sophia Bush has become a pro at juggling a hectic schedule. She landed her first big role as a junior in college, and never looked back. It goes without saying that the Chicago P.D. star, now 34,doesn’t get much “me time.” But she refuses to let the demands of her work get in the way of her sanity. Instead she’s on a mission to bust the stigma on self care, and change its connotation from “selfish.” We caught up with the actress at a Listerine event, where she was promoting the brand’s new campaign about boldness (a quality Bush embraces). Here, she shares her strategies for maintaining balance, no matter what kind of stress she’s dealing with on the job.

Carve out alone time

“Relaxation is tough because everything is always going 100 miles an hour, especially in a job like mine, when you’re on a set for 16 hours a day and there are 150 people around you all of the time. What I’ve learned through trial and error over the years is that you can really create big change with small moments, and you have to start injecting those moments into your life with little incremental changes.

"So with me, knowing that I get pretty drained being on set, I have started changing what that habit looks like. I come into work earlier, I give myself an extra half an hour in the morning. I go through hair and makeup. I have breakfast and then I’m done while everyone else is still getting ready and doing their thing. So I have half an hour to myself and I’ll sit in my trailer, do a meditation app, stretch (especially if I have a big scene of stunts coming up).

"I love the people that I work with, but I don’t have to have lunch with them everyday, 10 months of the year. I now hang out with everyone for eight hours on set. But at lunchtime, those 20 minutes are mine to sit by myself and that’s where I practice self-care. Maybe I do 25 sit-ups, or maybe I just lay on the floor with my dog and it’s so good.”

RELATED: 25 Surprising Ways Stress Affects Your Health

Meditate in the morning

Meditation wakes you up. Someone asked me, ‘Don’t you meditate before you go to bed?’ If I meditated before I went to bed, I’d never sleep. For me, to meditate in the morning before things get going on set, that sets the tone of my whole day and I notice that I don’t feel as happy or as calm when I don’t. Taking time for you actually has a ripple effect in how your entire day goes and how you are with others. I get more stressed when I’m not meditating, so it’s not only a way to practice self-care, it’s also a way to be a better performer at work.”

Give yourself a break

“I’m nowhere near perfect. I don’t meditate everyday. But, I do what I can, when I can. Creating that habit has also created the bigger change in just accepting what I can do at that time. One day I’ll eat really healthy and go for a walk and think 'I earned all the wellness points.’ But then the next day, I’ll eat a bunch of Thai food, sleep in, and not answer any emails, but so what? We’re only human.”

Repeat this mantra

“My best friend Nia said something to me years ago, she just said, 'Whatever it is, let it be enough,’ and I think about that all the time: Let it be enough. And I find that when I take moments of pause, those are the thoughts that I can come back to.”

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Be bold

“You’re allowed to be proud of your intellect. You’re allowed to set goals. You’re allowed to ask questions when you don’t know the answers. All of those things require boldness and giving yourself permission. And I think sometimes having that philosophical moment of saying 'I’m going to to let this be enough’ or 'I’m going to take a risk,’ that all requires boldness. Both care and mindfulness encourage us to own our power and be bold.”

Find your happy song

One of my best friends is an artist called Betty Who and her albums are the best. Her new record, The Valley, just came out and literally I listen to “Mama Say” on repeat. I listen to it all day, every day. Sometimes in the morning I won’t meditate and just put on Betty Who and have a dance party of one in my trailer, and it puts me in a great mood for the rest of the day.

As part of its #UnlockYourBold campaign, Listerine teamed up with the app Inscape to create three guided meditations meant to inspire and invigorate. Download the free app to listen.

This sense of the beat or pulse underlying the whole // Denise Levertov, “Some Notes on Organic Form”

For me, back of the idea of organic form is the concept that there is a form in all things (and in our experience) which the poet can discover and reveal. There are no doubt temperamental differences between poets who use prescribed forms and those who look for new ones—people who need a tight schedule to get anything done, and people who have to have a free hand—but the difference in their conception of “content” or “reality” is functionally more important. On the one hand is the idea that content, reality, experience, is essentially fluid and must be given form; on the other, this sense of seeking out inherent, though not immediately apparent, form. Gerard Manley Hopkins invented the word “inscape” to denote intrin­sic form, the pattern of essential characteristics both in single objects and (what is more interesting) in objects in a state of relation to each other, and the word “instress” to denote the experiencing of the perception of inscape, the apperception of inscape. In thinking of the process of poetry as I know it, I extend the use of these words, which he seems to have used mainly in reference to sensory phenomena, to include intellectual and emotional experience as well; I would speak of the inscape of an experience (which might be composed of any and all of these elements, including the sensory) or of the inscape of a sequence or constellation of experiences.

A partial definition, then, of organic poetry might be that it is a method of apperception, i.e., of recognizing what we perceive, and is based on an intuition of an order, a form beyond forms, in which forms partake, and of which man’s creative works are analogies, resemblances, natural allegories. Such po­etry is exploratory.

How does one go about such a poetry? I think it’s like this: first there must be an experience, a sequence or constellation of perceptions of sufficient interest, felt by the poet intensely enough to demand of him their equivalence in words: he is brought to speech. Suppose there’s the sight of the sky through a dusty window, birds and clouds and bits of paper flying through the sky, the sound of music from his radio, feelings of anger and love and amusement roused by a letter just received, the memory of some long-past thought or event associated with what’s seen or heard or felt, and an idea, a concept, he has been pondering, each qualifying the other; together with what he knows about history; and what he has been dreaming—­whether or not he remembers it—working in him. This is only a rough outline of a possible moment in a life. But the condition of being a poet is that periodically such a cross section, or constellation, of experiences (in which one or another element may predominate) demands, or wakes in him this demand: the poem. The beginning of the fulfillment of this demand is to contemplate, to meditate; words which connote a state in which the heat of feeling warms the intellect. To contemplate comes from “templum, temple, a place, a space for observation, marked out by the augur.” It means, not simply to observe, to regard, but to do these things in the presence of a god. And to meditate is “to keep the mind in a state of contemplation”; its synonym is “to muse,” and to muse comes from a word mean­ing “to stand with open mouth”—not so comical if we think of “inspiration”—to breathe in.

So—as the poet stands open-mouthed in the temple of life, contemplating his experience, there come to him the first words of the poem: the words which are to be his way in to the poem, if there is to be a poem. The pressure of demand and the meditation on its elements culminate in a moment of vision, of crystallization, in which some inkling of the correspondence between those elements occurs; and it occurs in words. If he forces a beginning before this point, it won’t work. These words sometimes remain the first, sometimes in the completed poem their eventual place may be elsewhere, or they may turn out to have been only forerunners, which fulfilled their function in bringing him to the words which are the actual beginning of the poem. It is faithful attention to the experience from the first moment of crystallization that allows those first or those forerunning words to rise to the surface: and with that same fidelity of attention the poet, from that moment of being let in to the possibility of the poem, must follow through, letting the experience lead him through the world of the poem, its unique inscape revealing itself as he goes.

Keep reading

My own analysis on Naruto 698

Did you see that change in Sasuke’s eye before trying to kill Naruto?

He hesitated. And he closed his Sharingan so that moment won’t impregnate in his mind, because the sight of Naruto’s death would cause him pain, Naruto being his family. 

We know that Sharingan is named also ”Copy Wheel Eye” and ”The Eye that reflects the heart” and grants the user the ability to copy and memorise everything.

And Naruto saw the change in his eyes (heart) and he knew that is not too late to save him from darkness.  ”That gaze is inscapable” - on the first page form Naruto 698

And that’s why Sasuke is smiling. He’s glad that he lost, that he didn’t kill Naruto. He’s glad because he didn’t lose any important person (like Itachi). Maybe he knew from the begginning that Naruto will win, that he couldn’t do it.

He didn’t want this to happen again. Because he loved Itachi and he loves Naruto. And for him, they represent his family.

*Sorry for my English*

anonymous asked:

Hey so I just recently got into poetry and I was wondering if you had any recommendations?? :)

UM, YOU’D BET YOUR BOOTS I DO

I’M SORRY I’LL STOP i could go on forever

“Everyone lives in two worlds, right? There’s the physical world… but there’s also our own private worlds, the world of our thoughts. A world made of ideas instead of stuff. It’s just as real as our world, but it’s inside. It’s an inscape” ~NOS4A2 by Joe Hill

hello my old heart || a mix for when magic pulls you taut and you stand before the bitten boy you rose from. ( listen. )

( or alternatively: the playlist to a current scott/season one scott au no one asked for )

 ✗. hello my old heart — the oh hello’s | ✗. start at the beginning — among savages | ✗. refuge — the antlers | ✗. hearts a mess  — gotye | ✗. sun in your eyes — grizzly bear | ✗. fear of my identity — best coast | ✗. the sun — shiny toy guns | ✗.  mirror — little dragon | ✗. gimme sympathy ( acoustic )  — metric | ✗. supersymmetry — arcade fire | ✗. make a fist — phantogram | ✗. lights changing colour — stars | ✗. inscape — stateless | ✗.  our song — the xx | 

The Windhover

I caught this morning morning’s minion, king-
dom of daylight’s dauphin, dapple-dawn-drawn Falcon, in his riding 
Of the rolling level underneath him steady air, and striding 
High there, how he rung upon the rein of a wimpling wing 
In his ecstasy! then off, off forth on swing, 
As a skate’s heel sweeps smooth on a bow-bend: the hurl and gliding 
Rebuffed the big wind. My heart in hiding 
Stirred for a bird,—the achieve of, the mastery of the thing! 

Brute beauty and valour and act, oh, air, pride, plume, here 
Buckle! AND the fire that breaks from thee then, a billion 
Times told lovelier, more dangerous, O my chevalier! 

No wonder of it: sheer plod makes plough down sillion 
Shine, and blue-bleak embers, ah my dear, 
Fall, gall themselves, and gash gold-vermillion.

Gerard Manley Hopkins 1918