inner stars

Rise to higher altitudes in your life. As you do this, you may feel the air around you getting thinner. It may become harder to breathe. The view below you may become increasingly daunting. But yet, you will be able to see more as you reach greater heights. The sun, stars, and sky will be that much closer. Everything would be that much more peaceful.
—  Nicole Addison @thepowerwithin

My door is open and I Am allowing abundance to flow into my life. I Am ready to accept and receive miracles beyond what I’ve ever experienced. Namaste


Motion by @rexisky

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The Voyager Golden Records are phonograph records that were included aboard both Voyager spacecraft launched in 1977. They contain sounds and images selected to portray the diversity of life and culture on Earth, and are intended for any intelligent extraterrestrial life form, or for future humans, who may find them. Neither Voyager spacecraft is heading toward any particular star, but Voyager 1 will pass within 1.6 light-years of the star Gliese 445, currently in the constellation Camelopardalis, in about 40,000 years. 

The Voyager Golden Record contains 115 images plus a calibration image and a variety of natural sounds, such as those made by surf, wind, and thunder, and animal sounds, including the songs of birds and whales. The record additionally features musical selections from different cultures and eras, spoken greetings in fifty-nine languages, and printed messages from President Jimmy Carter and U.N. Secretary-General Kurt Waldheim. The items were selected for NASA by a committee chaired by Carl Sagan of Cornell University.

Skulls and Roses ☠️🥀

JUNGKOOK - COLLEGE AU, TATTOOIST AU. 

The best way to get someone’s attention is to get a tattoo or hit someone with your motorcycle. 

PART TWO

Originally posted by sugutie

“Shit, shit, shit, shit.” you sprint across the quad, pushing past students and jumping over bushes and benches like a track star doing hurdles. The chanting of the curse word only gets louder and faster once you looked down at your watch once again and saw that your class would start in less than a minute and you were a mile away from the science building.

You’re too distracted with staring at your watch that you don’t notice that you’re in the middle of the street until your face is touching the rough pavement and some random guy is sprawled beside you. At first, you think that it’s a boulder that had fallen from the mountains that surrounded your campus but when your vision focused on the black lump you realized it was a helmet.

Keep reading

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“Meet me on Thames Street, I’ll take you out
Though I’m hardly worth your time
In the cold you look so fierce
But I’m warming up because the tension’s like a fire
We’ll hit South Broadway in a matter of minutes” 

 Thames & South Broadway| Baltimore Maryland

10 Ways to Find Inspiration:

1.  Walk down to your favorite cafe.  Look and listen to the world around you, and let your mind wander.  You’ll be surprised at the ideas that start to flow.

2.  Go to a quiet coffee place, restaurant, or library, and read a chapter of a really good book.  Not necessarily a “classic” or something pretentiously intellectual, but something you enjoy reading and like something you’d want to produce.  

For example:  when I was working on my urban fantasy novel, I read a lot of Good Omens and American Gods.

3.  Be sure to listen to music – it doesn’t matter what – that makes you feel passionate or emotional, particularly in regards to something you want to write.  When I’m writing a scene that’s fast or angry, like a fight scene or a confrontation, I’ll listen to a lot of punk rock and heavy metal, like Disturbed or Metallica, or if I’m writing something upbeat I’ll channel my inner Star Lord and listen to some upbeat 80s music.  Basically, listen to music that matches the mood of what you’re trying to write.

4.  This is going to sound painfully cliche, but keep a notebook.  I would frequently write down ideas during boring lectures (though for the sake of your GPA, you may not want to follow my example), as well as jot down the oddly specific sentences that popped into my head.  Sure enough, some of them strung together to create coherent stories.  They’re also lots of fun for doodling.

5.  Try to keep a clean working environment.  Personally, my brain is easily sidetracked by clutter, and will procrastinate what I actually need to do by cleaning off my desk or re-organizing my pencil drawer.  Try to get this done ahead of time.   

6.  If possible, don’t work at home.  My house is full of distractions, and I just feel fresher once I’m outside.  

7.  Seriously, cafes are the best.  You won’t feel isolated, but there’s usually not too many people you know to provide a distraction.  Couple this with a pleasant atmosphere and caffeinated beverages, and you’ve got an ideal writing environment.

Find a cute, cozy cafe and make it your sanctuary.

8.  Don’t edit until you’re completely done.  Writers are infamously hard on themselves, nothing is as discouraging as seeing how clumsy and disjointed your first draft appears.  Rewrite and revise afterwards, but in the meantime, keep moving forwards. 

9.  Write every day, even if you aren’t necessarily feeling it.  It might not seem like it helps, but it does, and your skills will improve exponentially.  

As Barbara Kingsolver wrote, “Don’t wait for the muse.  She has a lousy work ethic.  Writers just write.”   

10.  Conversely, if nothing’s working for you and you’re feeling frustrated, just give yourself a break.  It could just mean your creativity is in hibernation mode, which is 100% normal and okay.  Inspiration will strike again, so go about your business and be kind to yourself.