ink-pieces

Darling, if ever you become tired of yourself, of collapsing into yourself every night, remember that you have me. You can collapse into me. You know you always can.
—  Lukas W. // You have me

Something I’ve run into quite a lot while doing the whole “project manager” thing is artist who are openly hostile to the idea of engaging with the “business side” of what they do. There’s this broad perception that that business side of art means advertising and merchandising and selling out, and while it certainly can mean that, a lot of it is much more basic - and it’s stuff that’s absolutely not optional if art is anything beyond a personal fun-time hobby for you.

Stuff like:

1. Having reality-based metrics for time and resource commitment - or, in plain English, making sure that what you’re charging for your commissions is actually based on how hard they are to do.

It’s downright shocking how rare this is. I’ve encountered digital artists who routinely charge less for a spec that takes them much longer to do based on purely abstract notions of how “complex” the piece is, without reference to their actual, demonstrable time commitment. Heck, I’ve run into a traditional artist who ended up making nickles per hour for a major commission because she hadn’t correctly tallied up the cost of the art supplies expended in producing it!

The only way to arrive at appropriate metrics is based on evidence; your off-the-cuff estimates will always, always be wrong. Literally time yourself as you work on pieces of various types, and write down how long it took you. And never assume that it will be quicker next time; that’s called the planning fallacy, and it will eat you alive if you let it.

2. Having a lifecycle management plan for the tools you need to work.

Tablets don’t last forever. Neither do computers. Even software can become so outdated and incompatible as to lose utility over time. Basically, your tools have a finite lifespan, and you need to have a plan for replacing them as needed.

I understand that many independent artists don’t have the means to save up for new and replacement tools, and rely on second-hand hardware, gifts from friends and family, or donation drives on their blogs to fill the gap. That’s fine - artists relying on patronage has a long and distinguished history. The important thing is that these avenues be part of a plan, not a desperate scramble after some 100% foreseeable circumstance has rendered you unable to work.

Data on average time-to-failure for your hardware is readily accessible online; if, for example, that particular brand of tablet tends to last about three years, then you need to start organising your donation drive or dropping hints for your birthday at two years and six months, even if your equipment seems perfectly fine. The same goes for software; the vendor’s support window (i.e., the time after which they’ll stop publishing bugfixes and security updates) for your version of the software is a known factor.

3.  Having a formal requirements-gathering and signoff procedure.

I know that sounds like a lot of boring paperwork, and to be honest it kind of is, but it’s also critical for anything you’re not drawing for yourself. Language is an imprecise medium; based on a few minutes of casual conversation, you can easily end up in situations where you and your commissioner have totally different understandings of what the job entails, yet you’re both convinced you’ve understood the other perfectly.

You should have a detailed written description of what’s involved, and your client’s explicit, documented confirmation that they’ve read, understood and agreed to it, before you draw a single stroke. This includes timelines and deliverables as well as content; I’ve run into numerous cases of clients who’ve alleged non-delivery of services based on their understanding that they’d be receiving a traditional, ink-and-paper piece where the artist understood the commission to involve only digital work, and more than one case where a client started hollering about breach of contract less than 24 hours after signing off because they honestly thought it would be done already.

You have to nip that in the bud; this level of documentation is a bare minimum for anyone who takes money to do art, not a nice-to-have.

Saki’s BoS: Lemon Wish Spell

Originally posted by irinadg58

Last night while scrolling my Tumblr feed, I stumbled upon asksecularwitch’s Peach Cobbler Spell from last year and it reminded my of a spell I did in my childhood, when I was too innocent to actually know I did a thing.

One day, my best friend came to my house to play and in the middle of the day, totally random she told me: Hey, do you want to know something cool? Someone told me that if you write your wish on a piece of paper with red ink and flood it in lemon juice, your wish is gonna come true. This lady told me that it was a white magic trick.

Little did she know I used that recipe all of my teenage years to get books. It’s a very simple spell, done mostly for kids or by kids, so bear with me. You can add things to it if you want, but for me, the original recipe did the trick.Here we go.

You’ll need:

  • A container to hold the juice
  • Lemon Juice
  • Red Ink (marker, pen, anything)
  • Piece of paper

Write your wish on the piece of paper with the red ink. Put it in your container, you jar or whatever it is you chose. Flood the paper in lemon juice. Now play the waiting game until your wish comes true. I remember when I was a teen, I never waited more than a few months, but that was because I wished for a physical object. I never wished for something else than books, so if you wish for love or money, I have no idea how it’ll turn out. If you want to try it, tell me how it worked, I’ll be delighted to record the outcome for myself and anybody interested.

Have a good one. :)

- Saki

If you come to me as an ocean with big waves, surely, without hesitating, I will jump into you and drown. For someone who despises the water, that is how much I love you.
—  Lukas W. // How much I love you
10

SKETCHY BEHAVIORS | Heather Benjamin (RH)

Through her dense and detailed packed line drawings to her more focused ink brush pieces, Rhode Island based artist Heather Benjamin’s work is visceral, cathartic, and autobiographical. It offers a completely unapologetic and unflinching look into an artists’ own struggles with life, body image, self confidence, and sexuality.  We find her and her art to be inspirational, honest and badass.

We recently ran into Heather at her booth at the LA Art Book Fair and caught up with her a few months later to ask about her art, her experiences at RISD, her influences, and her thoughts about her work and her life. 

Photographs courtesy of the artist.

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I wasn’t sure I was lovable. I wasn’t sure somebody would want to spend their days, and their nights loving me. I never thought I would be able to spark somebody’s interest past my physical attributes. I was used to being loved and then being left, but you saw past me. You saw past my long curled hair, and red lips. You saw past my brown almond shaped eyes, and my curves. You saw past my flesh, and bone structure. Because once you saw all of me, you still stayed. You loved my mind and soul, as much as you loved my body. You loved me.

“It’s rather pathetic.”

“What is?”

“The fact that I could conquer the whole world, but never her heart.”

—  Lukas W. // Forgotten Words #143 // “Some things are not meant to be no matter what you do”
2

“Fear is the price of imagination.”

By me, I used a combination of pencil, watercolor, & ink.
So for this piece I really wanted to take a combination of things that Hannibal and Will shared, intimately.
From the messed encephalitis clock all the way to the snails that were eating the gorgeous firefly piece Will created all on his own.
(Though this piece is suppose to represent the combination of Will and Hannibal’s relationship, I still threw in the death head because even though this symbolism wasn’t in the show, I feel it holds such a strong tie to who they are & the ‘occult like’ culture behind Hannibal based films I couldn’t leave it out as a fannibal.)

#Hannibal #artwork #myart #fearisthepriceofimagination #fannibal #hannigram #fanart #myart

Dipped in Ink (Namjoon/Reader)

Prompt: REQUEST COMING THROUGH! Idk if you know what a stick and poke tattoo is, but I was wondering if I could have one with Joon where he gives the reader a stick and poke tattoo? I know he’s pretty clumsy but I feel like doing something like that for someone who he loves he’d be super careful. (if not pick any other member i’m cool with all my boys). I just think it’d be something sort of intimate cos it kinda hurts. and then maybe it could lead to some sexy times? THANKS LUV U

Genre: Smut

Words: 4K+

Author: Admin Kaycie

Summary: “You know,” He began carefully, voice lowering as he leaned back over your body, pushing the needle into your flesh again slowly. “I’ve heard that for some pain can be an aphrodisiac…”

Tags: Mentions of Tattooing (needles, blood, etc.), Dirty Talk, Mutual Masturbation, Daddy!Joon, Baby Girl, etc. 

Please note, I am no expert in the art of anything tattoo related, so please do not try to be rude if I messed up any of the details as far as that goes.

Originally posted by rapnamu


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I hope that you will find yourself before anything else, that you will not run out of your house in the middle of the night just to search for the missing pieces of you in strangers. I hope that you will stumble upon a love you live to give away, the kind that flows endlessly, that lives forever. I hope you will be happy for a long, long time.
—  Lukas W. // My good wish to you
This is a love letter to the one I will never get to love. This is also an apology letter to you, for the time I took to let you go in spite of not having you in the first place.
—  Lukas W. // The letter

pieces of eternity

i guess this is how waves sound
when they crash beyond the edge
of my sanity

so late now. this is what you write
when you can no longer make sense
of reality

face down in the dark of the night
my soul aches. my mind disconnects
from majority

you’re a stormy ocean and i never regret
but i regret that you saw me broken –


dancing with the skeletons in my closet


looking at the family picture in a shattered
frame

of my father; eyes red
no longer able to
handle the liquor
damaging his liver

you were my medicine
no. you were everything

you made me a better man


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