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Happy Birthday Laura Ingalls Wilder! (February 7, 1867 – February 10, 1957) 

American writer known for the Little House on the Prairie series of children’s novels (1932 to 1943) based on her childhood in a settler family.

Portrait of Laura Ingalls Wilder. Printed on front: “Mansfield Art Studio, Mansfield, Missouri.” Handwritten on front: “Laura Ingalls Wilder, 1930 [sic]." 

  • Courtesy of Rare Book Collection, Detroit Public Library
Birthday Facts

I share my birthday with the following awesome people: Sir Thomas More, Charles Dickens, Fredrick Douglass, Laura Ingalls Wilder, Sinclair Lewis, Garth Brooks, Chris Rock, Eddie Izzard, Debra Ann Woll, Tina Majorino, Ashton Kutcher, and to me the best one of all: WAYNE ALLWINE! Who is Wayne Allwine? Only the voice of the one and only Mickey Mouse. Therefore Mickey Mouse and I are more deeply connected than one would realize. I do also like that there are several very prolific writers too.

A Tuareg man wearing a taguelmoust, a combination of veil and turban that covers the face, walks past men and their camels at the Cure Salee festival in Ingal September 17, 2011. Tuareg, Peul and Wodaabe nomads congregate each year at the salt flats around the northern oasis town of Ingal for the Cure Salee (salt cure), where their camels, cattle, sheep and goats drink the mineral-rich water after months on the move. Niger’s nomads have held the three-day long event for centuries to mark the end of the rains, exchanging news and information amid music and dance as they prepare their animals over several weeks for the dry season. REUTERS/Luc Gnago


A Tuareg man wearing a taguelmoust, a combination of veil and turban that covers the face, walks past men and their camels at the Cure Salee festival in Ingal September 17, 2011. Tuareg, Peul and Wodaabe nomads congregate each year at the salt flats around the northern oasis town of Ingal for the Cure Salee (salt cure), where their camels, cattle, sheep and goats drink the mineral-rich water after months on the move. Niger’s nomads have held the three-day long event for centuries to mark the end of the rains, exchanging news and information amid music and dance as they prepare their animals over several weeks for the dry season. REUTERS/Luc Gnago


Orange is the New Black: Sister Jane Ingalls [INFJ]

UNOFFICIAL TYPING by howtotallyamazing 

Introverted Intuition (Ni): Sister Ingalls life and vision is dedicated to her religion and her service at the church. She frets about her future in the convent, thinking she has “fallen in with the bad nuns”. She gets so caught up in her views and activism that she gets arrested and winds up at Litchfield after having handcuffed herself to a flagpole. She hopes to change the world with her activism.

Extroverted Feeling (Fe): Sister Ingalls is not afraid to share her feelings. In fact, she goes as far as to write a book about her views on faith and religion. She’s accessible and friendly to the other inmates, save for Pennsatucky and her radical views and when she finally gets tired of Soso and promptly tells her to shut up. She joins Soso in her hunger strike and is the only one that starts the hunger strike with her that continues it way after she’s doing it, to help protest Soso being forced to take a shower.

Introverted Thinking (Ti): Religious text is open to interpretation for Sister Ingalls. She constantly finds herself questioning her faith because God has yet to speak to her and she has yet to “feel his presence”. She helps objectively council Sophia through her marriage problems.

Extroverted Sensing (Se): Getting caught up in the flurry of her fame due to her book, Sister Ingalls takes it as far as she can until she is excommunicated from the church. She is shown to chase the limelight and be very opportunistic with her activism, using it to catapult her fame. She gets caught up in the hunger strike to the point where she winds up in the medical wing.

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Snow is finally in the forecast for New York City, so while you’re out taking selfies, remember old Frank Ingalls, the self-taught photographer who braved the elements with his camera in hand to capture these lovely wintry scenes so many decades ago.

Frank M. Ingalls, New York City: Fifth Avenue and 25th Street, Madison Square Park, in snow, undated (1901-1930). N-YHS.

Frank M. Ingalls, New York City: Whitehall Building, 17 Battery Place, Battery Park, in snow, undated  (1901-1930). N-YHS.

Frank M. Ingalls, New York City: man with two small dogs in an unidentified yard in heavy snow, undated (1901-1930). N-YHS.

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5 Great Reads for a Cold, Snowy Winter’s Day.

1. Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton. You might have read this in high school. It’s well under 100 pages, and possibly one of the saddest stories ever told. Believe me, you’ll still apreciate this one more as an adult than you did when your were 15. Don’t read this one if you’re drinking. 

2. The Indifferent Stars Above by Daniel James Brown. Ah, the Donner Party. I’ve always been fascinated by tales of survival and cannibalism. This one has it all. Strong, sturdy folks, making their way across an unforgiving landscape. Explanations of how many Big Macs you’d have to eat to survive the trek. ALWAYS ask for directions is the lesson here. Read this if you have plenty of snacks.

3. The Long Winter by Laura Ingalls Wilder. I adore the Little House series, and while it is fictional, all of it is heavily based on the author’s own life experiences, so read into it what you may. The winter of 1880-81 was NOT fictional, and the people and animals of the Dakotas really suffered. If you need a rope to find your way back from the mailbox, this book is for you!

4. Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier. A swoon-worthy love story, with an amazing cast of characters, this is the story of Inman, a Confederate soldier trying to find his way back home to Cold Mountain, North Carolina, and his one true love, Ada. The story does not take place entirely in the winter, but I can promise you some of the most perfectly beautiful and romantic scenes do. Read this if you’re snowed in with the love of your life!

5. The Children’s Blizzard by David Laskin. This is the R rated version of The Long Winter. It’s 1888, weather forecasting is still an imprecise science, and even if it wasn’t, no one has tv or radio to get the news that a major blizzard will be arriving. Many children were lost in this horrible storm, when it landed in the Plains with little warning. This writing is as good as any Erik Larson book, maybe more so. I have two words for you: frozen kids. Read this if your babies are all safely home.  

Some old-fashioned things like fresh air and sunshine are hard to beat.
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Soooo… That’s still happening, yeah. It’s a little misleading because the wind is so high that it’s in huge drifts everywhere. You can see how that snow is higher on one side. We’ve gotten about 18" so far if I had to guess. Still, we have power and Internet and thanks to offhand remarks from @teland we have this American’s best attempt at Cornish pasties. So it could be worse.

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AUTHORS THAT JUST MAKE ME WANT TO BUY ALL THE BOOKS