information art

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Extra bonus round on “How to spot an artist” pro-tips:

Rubens: “Skinny may be in. But fat is where it’s at.”

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Michelangelo: “Nude women are muscularly sculpted men with oddly shaped fruits attached on as breasts.”

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Road Trip by Noel Kerns

Noel Kerns is a Dallas-based photographer specializing in capturing Texas’ ghost towns, decommissioned military bases, and industrial abandonments at night. Growing up in the central Texas hill country, Kerns developed his photographic skills shooting large format black & white landscapes.  The slow and deliberate nature of the large format photographic process was a perfect launching pad into the art of digitally photographing the nocturnal world.

One of the things Kerns enjoy most about photographing under a full moon are all the latent details, those things which reveal themselves only when you take the time to let the moonlight tell the story. He loves the calm and tranquility of a peaceful night scene, as well as the eerie feeling one can get when shooting an old desert ghost town under a full moon.

Follow the Source Link for images sources and more information.

“Your dad would totally fire me if he walked in on this, you know.”

“And lose the greatest literal babysitter he’s ever hired? I don’t think so.”

“…”

“…”

Adrien…”

Marinette strains her neck to look at Adrien petulantly; he looks over at her and cracks a grin. 

“You’re slipping, Mari!”

As his serious facade melts, Marinette is suddenly acutely aware of how warm he is against her. She’s not sure she likes the feeling as her blood runs cold and her heart clenches. I can’t do this, she reminds herself sourly, and tries to go back to relishing in her friend’s company.

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Miniature Landscapes by Heidi Annalise

Heidi Annalise is the Colorado-based artist behind these 2x3-inch tiny oil painting, joyfully created on site amidst mosquitos, blistering heat, and frigid winds! Each painting captures a unique moment in time, and is painted on a wooden panel using a “mint tin palette”.

Follow the Source Link for images sources and more information.

The History Behind ‘The Woman in Gold’

Easily one of my favourite paintings, by one of my most favourite artists, Klimt’s painting ‘Adele Bloch-Bauer’s Portrait’ is well-known for many reasons. Clearly seen it was created in Klimt’s “golden phase,” this painting is so striking not just for it’s beauty, but also its long and tragic history.

Adele Bloch-Bauer and her husband, Ferdinand Bloch, were close friends with the artist, Gustav Klimt. She modeled for Klimt on numerous occasions, and Ferdinand commissioned two portraits of his wife. The married couple were well-known lovers of art. Adele would entertain many artists at their home - from musicians to painters. The Bloch-Bauer’s were a prominent Jewish family in Viennese society. This is precisely why they were targeted by Nazis in the 1940’s. The Bloch-Bauer’s home was emptied of its beautiful and loved possessions - including Adele Bloch-Bauer’s portrait. Of course, no Nazi could have the portrait of a Jewish woman hanging in their home, so her name was erased from the painting’s history and instead given the title “Woman in Gold.”

Eventually the painting was collected by the Austrian state gallery, and became one of Austria’s artistic ‘Golden Age’ symbols. Her story does not end here, because years later, in 2000, Adele’s niece - Maria Viktoria Bloch-Bauer (Maria Altman) - sued Austria for the ownership of the painting. Maria remembered visiting her aunt’s and uncle’s home throughout her childhood. After Adele died, their visits included a viewing of the gorgeous golden portrait. While Maria later fled Austria and settled in America with her husband, she eventually returned decades later after being told that the painting was rightfully hers. In Adele’s will she had asked that her husband donate her paintings to the gallery, yet in her husband’s will he had left them to his family. After years and years of court hearings and trials, Maria finally won back the painting.

Adele Bloch-Bauer’s portrait now sits in a Manhattan gallery, after being purchased for $135 million (US). This portrait was just one of many that was looted during World War II. Thankfully, the history of the painting, the subject, and her family have the recognition they deserve. It’s tragic that so many pieces of art and family heirlooms are still lost because of the prejudices and crimes of those that abused their power. Those organizations not only wiped out families, but also sought to destroy any memory of them.

Movies and interviews have been made to show people the history of this famous painting, such as ‘Stealing Klimt’ (2007), and the film ‘Woman in Gold’ (2015) which I both highly recommend.

Above: Adele Bloch-Bauer’s Portrait (Woman in Gold, Adele Bloch-Bauer I.), 1907, by Gustav Klimt (1862-1918)

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Honestly Bakugou would be the best sparring partner for Uraraka since he won’t hold back at all and recognizes her strength anyways! Also my excuse for wanting to drawing those pants cause I love doing that in my own pair … Ehehe

Also bonus!

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For post 3000, I thought it would be nice to finally finish the bigender comic I’ve been working on since… before I started this blog. So here it is!

Description:

Panel 1: Round smiley face that’s green on the right side and purple on the left. To the right is another face with irregular patches of purple and green. Captions read “Bigender people can feel split in two, or with two genders all mixed together”.

Panel 2: Face colored a blend of green and purple. To the right is another face with rectangular patches of green, purple, and the blend. Below are two faces, one with purple filling the lower third of the left side and green on the right side, and one that is mostly green with purple at the top. Captions read “The genders can be almost indistinguishable, or feel like they correspond to different mindsets, or be different strengths”

Panel 3: Purple face with an arrow pointing to a green face on the right. To the right is a face with purple filling the lower third of the left side and green on the right side. Below is a sequence of three faces directed with arrows: the first face is mostly green with purple at the top, the second face is mostly purple with green at the bottom, and the third face is mostly white with purple on the left and green on the right at the bottom. Captions read “Bigender people can switch between genders, or have a completely static gender, or have the strength of the genders change”

Panel 4: “The genders can be female, male, agender, polygender, or whatever else the person feel fits each part. What all bigender people have in common is they are TWO genders. Not just one or another; BOTH”. Gender signs are above each corresponding gender identity.

Panel 5: Bigender people can use any pronouns. Above is a speech bubble with many pronoun sets in different fonts.

Panel 6: A green stick figure with a face that is partially purple on the left and green on the right. To the right are two stick figures with a double-ended arrow between them, one green and one purple, each with a face that is purple on the left and green on the right. Captions read “A bigender person may choose to present as one gender, or switch back and forth”

Panel 7: Two stick figures, one green and purple, the other pink. Each has a face that is mostly purple with green on the bottom. Captions read “or present as a mixture, or something else entirely. But remember: Gender =/= Presentation, and they are always still bigender”

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The Art of Hirō Isono

Hirō Isono was a Japanese artist born in 1945, and passed away on May 2013. Shown in the majority of his work, you will notice that he had an affinity for trees, forests, and nature.

He gained more recognition from his artwork contributions to the 1990’s RPG series “Secret of Mana” or “Seiken Densetsu”, for the SNES. His visions and techniques always invoked reality with just a little hint of mystery. Not quite surreal, but just enough to make you think about what you’re looking at.

Follow the Source Link for image sources and more information.

“May I interest you in the New Salem Philanthropic Society?” he mumbled, but he hadn’t expected to be given a response.

Background practice made this take longer than intended oops. 
Art blog: questionartbox

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Salomé, 1909, by Paul Antoine de la Boulaye (1849-1926)

Many may not be familiar with the story of Salomé, and those that do not are probably quite unaware with exactly what they are looking at when staring right at this painting. First of all, artist Paul Antoine de la Boulaye truly had exquisite talent at giving his female subjects a subtle yet readable expression. Here we see, what you’d assume - and partly correct - a young, light-hearted dancing girl. A girl seemingly more childish than sultry. This, however, strongly contrasts with the story of the infamous Salomé. A young girl whose beautiful erotic dancing pleased her king so greatly, he granted her wish to have John the Baptist’s head on a platter. When paired with the description “an icon of dangerous female seductiveness,” this painting does not exactly hold it up. This painting is a perfect example of how knowing the story behind a work of art can be the key to “reading between the lines” of paintings.

Requested by @taymitsu.

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La Fábrica in Barcelona

In the words of the architect Ricardo Bofill:

We found enormous silos, a tall smoke snack, four kilometres of underground tunnels, machine rooms in good shape… This was in 1973 and it was our first encounter with the Cement Factory. This cement factory, dating from the first period of the industrialization of Catalonia, was not built at once or as a whole but was a series of additions as the various chains of production became necessary. The formal result was given, then, by a series of stratified elements, a process which is reminiscent of vernacular architecture, but applied to industry.

Keeping our eyes moving like a kaleidoscope, we already imagined future spaces and found out that the different visual and aesthetics trends that had developed since World War I coexisted here:

  • Surrealism in paradoxical stairs that lead to nowhere; the absurdity of certain elements hanging over voids; huge but useless spaces of weird proportions, but magical because of their tension and disproportion.
  • Abstraction in the pure volumes, which revealed themselves at times broken and raw.
  • Brutalism in the abrupt treatment and sculptural qualities of the materials.

Seduced by the contradictions and the ambiguity of the place, we quickly decided to retain the factory, and modifying its original brutality, sculpt it like a work of art. The result proves that form and function must be dissociated; in this case, the function did not create the form; instead, it has been shown that any space can be allocated whatever use the architect chooses, if he or she is sufficiently skilful.

“Presently I live and work here better than anywhere else. It is for me the only place where I can concentrate and associate ideas in the most abstract manner. I have the impression of living in a precinct, in a closed universe which protects me from the outside and everyday life. The Cement Factory is a place of work par excellence. Life goes on here in a continuous sequence, with very little difference between work and leisure. I have the impression of living in the same environment that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Catalonia.”

Follow the Source Link for image sources and more information.