information art

“May I interest you in the New Salem Philanthropic Society?” he mumbled, but he hadn’t expected to be given a response.

Background practice made this take longer than intended oops. 
Art blog: questionartbox

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Time to share with you one of my all-time favourite paintings! Now the 19th century was, in terms of artistic endever, a truly beautiful time. You cannot deny the artists of this period could certainly appeal to the viewers eyes. Of all the artworks of the 1800′s, I don’t think any really come close to this one. Vengence is Sworn’ (1851) by Italian artist Francesco Hayez (1791-1882), depicts a tragic tale.

The artwork was originally part of a series, it’s sister portraits named: ‘A Secret Accusation’, and A Rival’s Revenge (The Venetian Women).The former shown below.

And what, pray tell, is the story being told in Vengence is Sworn’? A devestated Venetian woman just told by her servant that her husband has been unfaithful. It shows a hurt woman. I love the poses here, the servant so close to whisper her the truth, written on that letter. The married woman pushing her away so you can almost feel her trying to reject the truth. When seeing their poses,  Wallace Stegner’s ‘Angle of Repose’ comes to mind:

“Touch. It is touch that is the deadliest enemy of chastity, loyalty, monogamy, gentility with its codes and conventions and restraints. By touch we are betrayed and betray others… an accidental brushing of shoulders or touching of hands… hands laid on shoulders in a gesture of comfort that lies like a thief, that takes, not gives, that wants, not offers, that awakes, not pacifies. When one flesh is waiting, there is electricity in the merest contact.

I feel it is same for the opposite, to deny that comfort. I feel that is what is shown here and certainly relevant to the time it represents.

The background is so simple, letting the attention to be drawn where it should be. It makes the characters that more dramatic. 

Another element I just love is the woman’s eyes. They way they are turned make it seems she has none at all. I believe they represent her blindness to how her husband has been loving another. They appear ghost-like, which I think reveals her own feelings also.

You can pick at this painting all you like, and no matter how much I’ll pretend to know about this painting, there is one reason above all others for me to love it. That is, it’s just simply a fucking beautiful work of art.

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For post 3000, I thought it would be nice to finally finish the bigender comic I’ve been working on since… before I started this blog. So here it is!

Description:

Panel 1: Round smiley face that’s green on the right side and purple on the left. To the right is another face with irregular patches of purple and green. Captions read “Bigender people can feel split in two, or with two genders all mixed together”.

Panel 2: Face colored a blend of green and purple. To the right is another face with rectangular patches of green, purple, and the blend. Below are two faces, one with purple filling the lower third of the left side and green on the right side, and one that is mostly green with purple at the top. Captions read “The genders can be almost indistinguishable, or feel like they correspond to different mindsets, or be different strengths”

Panel 3: Purple face with an arrow pointing to a green face on the right. To the right is a face with purple filling the lower third of the left side and green on the right side. Below is a sequence of three faces directed with arrows: the first face is mostly green with purple at the top, the second face is mostly purple with green at the bottom, and the third face is mostly white with purple on the left and green on the right at the bottom. Captions read “Bigender people can switch between genders, or have a completely static gender, or have the strength of the genders change”

Panel 4: “The genders can be female, male, agender, polygender, or whatever else the person feel fits each part. What all bigender people have in common is they are TWO genders. Not just one or another; BOTH”. Gender signs are above each corresponding gender identity.

Panel 5: Bigender people can use any pronouns. Above is a speech bubble with many pronoun sets in different fonts.

Panel 6: A green stick figure with a face that is partially purple on the left and green on the right. To the right are two stick figures with a double-ended arrow between them, one green and one purple, each with a face that is purple on the left and green on the right. Captions read “A bigender person may choose to present as one gender, or switch back and forth”

Panel 7: Two stick figures, one green and purple, the other pink. Each has a face that is mostly purple with green on the bottom. Captions read “or present as a mixture, or something else entirely. But remember: Gender =/= Presentation, and they are always still bigender”

Road to Success: Before Opening for Commissions

Artist’s Notes

**First off! I made this specifically for DeviantArt, and then realized that it really applies to every artist who is looking to get into the market of freelance work. I apologize that this journal references that site specifically quite a bit, but the information is still solid.

Commissions. Commissions. Commissions!
It’s all anyone on here seems to talk about. It’s like a measure of popularity.
But there’s a lot of danger in opening for commissions before you’re prepared, and that’s what this particular journal is about. Let’s avoid the common commission pitfalls (a journal for another day  ) and get a healthy, fully prepared start!

Build Your Fanbase

I’ve seen some people join deviantArt (or other sites) and instantly expect to get commissions. We’re talking the same day that they sign up.
Sorry, that’s just not how it works. Actually, you’ll be lucky to get commissions on deviantArt at all. DeviantArt is a community of artists. Sure, there are some buyers on here as well, but very rarely will you find regular work on this site. I like deviantArt because it’s a social network with other artists. It’s a place where I can come to make friends and learn. Sure, I can advertise myself on here, but most of my work comes from my Twitter, Tumblr, and own legwork.
I’d recommend establishing yourself with the same username in as many places as you comfortably can. When you’re narrowing down the prospects, I’d say to avoid small, start-up art communities (you know the ones I’m talking about, those “exclusive”, “by invite only” art sites. Who is going to buy your work there?). Make yourself known on established websites where there is already a user base to be a part of. Twitter, Tumblr, Art Station, Behance, deviantArt, LinkedIn, ConceptCookie and even FurAffinity (if you’re into that kind of thing) are all fantastic options.

Understand Pricing and it’s Consequences 

First off, don’t sell for points. Points is quite literally the equivalent of pocket change. 80 points is $1.
That means that if you’re selling a full color image for 500 points (which I see all the time) you’re selling it for $6.25.
$6.25 for a full picture. A full picture that I can promise you’ve spent more than a half an hour on.
I’ll write a full journal on how pricing works, but generally, you should not be selling your work for less than minimum wage per hour.
I’ll go through a lot of other pricing options in the other journal, but keep in mind that you are working on artwork. This is your time and you should be paid for it. Yes, you might absolutely LOVE doing artwork (so do I!) but you should still be paid for creating images for other people.
If you choose not to be paid now, or to be paid in pocket change now, or to be paid for $5/hr now, you’ll likely regret it later. Your “target market” for lower pricing will not be the same as your target market for average pay. People who pay in dA points likely won’t be returning for more work later, and if they do, it’ll be for the same price. People who are willing to pay what your work is worth are more likely to be repeat customers, are likely to talk more about your work if you do a good job, and are, of course, willing to give you the amount that you deserve so that you’re doing less work for the appropriate amount of money. If you spend most of your time targeting the lower-range market you won’t be able to raise your prices later. (For the record, I’m not talking about general watchers and followers, some people just can’t afford to buy art or don’t need it, but they’re no less valuable in terms of having an awesome fan base. We’re strictly talking about clientele here).

Create a Strong Terms of Service Agreement

Do your research!
Don’t just look at other ToS Agreements on deviantArt, many of them are not strong. If you can’t afford to hire an attorney, do some serious Google searching. There are a ton of really good samples of what your ToS should include.
Again, I’m planning a full journal for this as well, but a few points I could make right now are to include;
A) That you own all rights to your work. Make sure that this is a part of your Terms of Service. Yes, it goes without saying that you own what you make, but many times customers have the misinformed idea that because they’ve paid you they automatically own the artwork and can sell it, make prints of it, etc.
B) A clause about what happens if you become ill. I know it’s likely not something you’re thinking about now, but what if you take a commission and suddenly become ill or are involved in an accident of some kind? You’ll want to detail out what happens. Does the customer get a full refund? Do you require an extension on the work deadline? Do you retain their deposit or the payment for the work that’s been completed, but refund the rest? Think about this now, not later.
C) Bounced checks and returned payments. What if the client pays you in a check and it bounces? What happens if they do a charge-back with PayPal? Is there a fee that you’ll need covered? Most companies have a Returned Payment Fee because they don’t want to get stuck with the fee from the bank or processing center. It’s a smart fee to have included in your contract. From a consumer point of view, I know we all hate that fee, but from a business perspective, it’s a smart idea to have.
D) Do you have a Rush Fee? If a client contacts you and says “I need this done in three days time!” and your average turn around is a month, will there be an additional charge? Keep in mind that this means you’ll be putting all your other clients on the back burner, working longer hours than usual and possibly even weekends or holidays - maybe both. Most artists do have an additional charge for this. Think of it as over time.

**Have a Terms of Service before you open for commissions. Not after. Don’t wait for something to happen where you wish you’d had one.** 

Have Samples of Your Work

Weirdly enough, I felt the need to add this in here. I’ve seen a few people open for commissions that they don’t even have examples for. I’ve been contacted by people who have seriously told me “I don’t have any samples of animation, but I’m a really good animator. I work for $50/30 seconds. When do I start?”.
What?
No!
Don’t be that person. If you’re offering character design commissions, have some samples. If you’re offering storyboard commissions, have some samples. Illustration? Have some samples. Badges? Make some samples. Animation? You guessed it. Samples.
By doing this you’re not only showing your potential customers that you can provide the work you’re claiming you can and giving an example of quality, you’re doing yourself a favor by knowing an approximate of how long it’s going to take you to finish the work so you’re not overcharging your customer or short changing yourself.

In Closing

Remember! These steps aren’t just to help you get more commissions, they’re there for your protection. You don’t want to be involved in an all-too-common horror story scenario where a client can take advantage of you, and you don’t want to give your client a horror story about yourself (that they’ll undoubtedly share with every one of their friends and followers).

Protect your client, protect yourself, and protect your business.

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Salomé, 1909, by Paul Antoine de la Boulaye (1849-1926)

Many may not be familiar with the story of Salomé, and those that do not are probably quite unaware with exactly what they are looking at when staring right at this painting. First of all, artist Paul Antoine de la Boulaye truly had exquisite talent at giving his female subjects a subtle yet readable expression. Here we see, what you’d assume - and partly correct - a young, light-hearted dancing girl. A girl seemingly more childish than sultry. This, however, strongly contrasts with the story of the infamous Salomé. A young girl whose beautiful erotic dancing pleased her king so greatly, he granted her wish to have John the Baptist’s head on a platter. When paired with the description “an icon of dangerous female seductiveness,” this painting does not exactly hold it up. This painting is a perfect example of how knowing the story behind a work of art can be the key to “reading between the lines” of paintings.

Requested by @taymitsu.

I’m in a pretty bad mood today, so I’m trying to distract myself by turning this journal I got for xmas into a portable grimoire. My normal one is a large, faux leather binder meant for scrapbooking and it isn’t very travel friendly. This one will probably be less thorough, but it’ll be easy to carry around and good for basic reference when it’s finished. Sorry this photo is kind of shit, my actual camera needs charged so I had to use my phone.

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Commission guidelines

What I won’t draw

-scat/diapers, foot fetishes, loli/shota, futa- if you have any questions, come contact me

PRICES

Sketches - $20
- Maximum of 5 Characters per sketch
- $3 per extra 1 figure/ character included
- no background

Colored Sketches - $45 
- Maximum of 5 Characters per sketch
- $5 per extra 1 figure/ character included

Digital Color - $60
- Maximum of 4 Characters per sketch
- $5 per extra 1 figure/ character included

Paypal only


INFORMATION

 -Send me your request as message, or contact me at my email at imumeh22@live.com

-be as descriptive as you wish, and send references for what you want if possible. I’m open for some creative control but it helps to know what you want in this(poses,details,setting,etc) so lets work together.

-they will be done in order they are received

-Paypal only, The commission would start after the payment is received. I will not accept refunds but I will finish to commission even if it means a total redraw.

- During the process, feel free to ask me for any checkup, to see any changes needed to be done so no mistake won’t be made

- Upon completion, the commissioner will receive a digital 320 dpi copy of the work.

PLEASE TELL ME IF YOU WANT TO KEEP IT PRIVATE AND I WON’T POST IT ANYWHERE ON THE INTERNET.

Thank you and remember spaces are extremely limited  limited this time around!

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J. M. W. Turner (c. 1775-1851)

Born Joseph Mallord William Turner, this artist suffered many family hardships during his young life. The death of a sister and the institutionalization of his mother, Turner was sent to his uncle to be raised. On a happier note, it was during these times in his young life which his interest in art grew. His family - what little of it he had - supported his artistic endeavours, and when he was just fourteen years old, he was accepted into the Royal Academy of Art.

Turner was quite the prodigy. Exhibiting his work just after a year of study, he continued entering his paintings into successful exhibitions. He became a master in both watercolour and oil medium. Travelling all around Europe, J. M. W. Turner was not just a well-known name in London.

His works are absolutely gorgeous. There are few landscape artists that create paintings so striking as his. The way he works the paint to give the land such airy, cloudy, and atmospheric feel required an immense talent. He often painted destroyed landscapes, such as shipwrecks and even the 1834 Burning of Parliament. Capturing often naturally violent scenes, Turner clearly understood the effects of lighting. This understanding clearly shows itself in his later works, which became more impressionistic and held less focus on the subject matter itself. Colour and lighting help priority and is exactly what sets Turner’s art apart from many other painters of the time.

It’s difficult picking a favourite piece by Turner, but I feel these above, Modern Rome (Campo Vacino) and Snow Storm: Steam-Boat off a Harbour’s Mouth (1842), illustrate the specific style he incorporated during his whole artistic career.

Requested by @kunorodon

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DISHONORED ALPHABET CHALLENGE  ⇨ B is from Brigmore Witches, B is Black Magic

↳ “The Brigmore Witches are a coven located in the city of Dunwall, taking up residence in the abandoned Brigmore Manor. While little is known about them, they are said to be powerful black magic practitioners who have at least some involvement with the Outsider.They are hostile toward the Whalers, with their leader, Delilah Copperspoon, directing Overseers to attack their base and attempting to have Daud killed, and they are the main antagonists of Dishonored’s final DLC, The Brigmore Witches.”

[inspiration*]