inferior people

7 Incredible Things About Black Genetics That Will Amaze You

1. Black people are genetically stronger.

2. Black people have more genetic diversity.

3. Black genes prove the first humans are at least 70% older than previously estimated.

4. Black babies advance earlier and faster.

5. The miracles of melanin.

6. West Africans are genetically better sprinters.

7. Kenyans are genetically proven to have high endurance.

Source

White people can’t handle the truth about their inherent inferiority to black people so they always try to downplay our abilities and qualities.

I like seeing important facts like this. I’ve only seen something like this once or twice over the years in white-owned media.

And such information gives me strength and helps me to become more proud of my blackness despite some things that people like to talk about us.

123 Ideas for Character Flaws
  1. Absent-minded - Preoccupied to the extent of being unaware of one’s immediate surroundings. Abstracted, daydreaming, inattentive, oblivious, forgetful.
  2. Abusive - Characterized by improper infliction of physical or psychological maltreatment towards another.
  3. Addict - One who is addicted to a compulsive activity. Examples: gambling, drugs, sex.
  4. Aimless - Devoid of direction or purpose.
  5. Alcoholic - A person who drinks alcoholic substances habitually and to excess.
  6. Anxious - Full of mental distress or uneasiness because of fear of danger or misfortune; greatly worried; solicitous.
  7. Arrogant - Having or displaying a sense of overbearing self-worth or self-importance. Inclined to social exclusiveness and who rebuff the advances of people considered inferior. Snobbish.
  8. Audacious - Recklessly bold in defiance of convention, propriety, law, or the like; insolent; braze, disobedient.
  9. Bad Habit - A revolting personal habit. Examples: picks nose, spits tobacco, drools, bad body odour.
  10. Bigmouth - A loud-mouthed or gossipy person.
  11. Bigot - One who is strongly partial to one’s own group, religion, race, or politics and is intolerant of those who differ.
  12. Blunt - Characterized by directness in manner or speech; without subtlety or evasion. Frank, callous, insensitive, brusque.
  13. Bold - In a bad sense, too forward; taking undue liberties; over assuming or confident; lacking proper modesty or restraint; rude; impudent. Abrupt, brazen, cheeky, brassy, audacious.
  14. Callous - They are hardened to emotions, rarely showing any form of it in expression. Unfeeling. Cold.
  15. Childish - Marked by or indicating a lack of maturity; puerile.
  16. Complex - An exaggerated or obsessive concern or fear. (List specific complex.)
  17. Cruel - Mean to anyone or anything, without care or regard to consequences and feelings.
  18. Cursed - A person who has befallen a prayer for evil or misfortune, placed under a spell, or borne into an evil circumstance, and suffers for it. Damned.
  19. Dependent - Unable to exist, sustain oneself, or act appropriately or normally without the assistance or direction of another.
  20. Deranged - Mentally decayed. Insane. Crazy. Mad. Psychotic.
  21. Dishonest – Given to or using fraud, cheating; deceitful, deceptive, crooked, underhanded.
  22. Disloyal - Lacking loyalty. Unfaithful, perfidious, traitorous, treasonable
  23. Disorder - An ailment that affects the function of mind or body. (List the disorders name if they have one.) See the Mental Disorder List.
  24. Disturbed - Showing some or a few signs or symptoms of mental or emotional illness. Confused, disordered, neurotic, troubled.
  25. Dubious - Fraught with uncertainty or doubt. Undecided, doubtful, unsure.
  26. Dyslexic - Affected by dyslexia, a learning disorder marked by impairment of the ability to recognize and comprehend written words.
  27. Egotistical - Characteristic of those having an inflated idea of their own importance. Boastful, pompous.
  28. Envious - Showing extreme cupidity; painfully desirous of another’s advantages; covetous, jealous.
  29. Erratic - Deviating from the customary course in conduct or opinion; eccentric: erratic behaviour. Eccentric, bizarre, outlandish, strange.
  30. Fanatical - Fanatic outlook or behaviour especially as exhibited by excessive enthusiasm, unreasoning zeal, or wild and extravagant notions on some subject.
  31. Fickle – Erratic, changeable, unstable - especially with regard to affections or attachments; capricious.
  32. Fierce - Marked by extreme intensity of emotions or convictions; inclined to react violently; fervid.
  33. Finicky - Excessively particular or fastidious; difficult to please; fussy. Too much concerned with detail. Meticulous, fastidious, choosy, critical, picky, prissy, pernickety.
  34. Fixated - In psychoanalytic theory, a strong attachment to a person or thing, especially such an attachment formed in childhood or infancy and manifested in immature or neurotic behaviour that persists throughout life. Fetish, quirk, obsession, infatuation.
  35. Flirt -To make playfully romantic or sexual overtures; behaviour intended to arouse sexual interest. Minx. Tease.
  36. Gluttonous - Given to excess in consumption of especially food or drink. Voracious, ravenous, wolfish, piggish, insatiable.
  37. Gruff - Brusque or stern in manner or appearance. Crusty, rough, surly.
  38. Gullible - Will believe any information given, regardless of how valid or truthful it is, easily deceived or duped.
  39. Hard - A person who is difficult to deal with, manage, control, overcome, or understand. Hard emotions, hard hearted.
  40. Hedonistic - Pursuit of or devotion to pleasure, especially to the pleasures of the senses.
  41. Hoity-toity- Given to flights of fancy; capricious; frivolous. Prone to giddy behaviour, flighty.
  42. Humourless - The inability to find humour in things, and most certainly in themselves.
  43. Hypocritical - One who is always contradicting their own beliefs, actions or sayings. A person who professes beliefs and opinions for others that he does not hold. Being a hypocrite.
  44. Idealist - One whose conduct is influenced by ideals that often conflict with practical considerations. One who is unrealistic and impractical, guided more by ideals than by practical considerations.
  45. Idiotic - Marked by a lack of intelligence or care; foolish or careless.
  46. Ignorant - Lacking knowledge or information as to a particular subject or fact. Showing or arising from a lack of education or knowledge.
  47. Illiterate - Unable to read and write.
  48. Immature - Emotionally undeveloped; juvenile; childish.
  49. Impatient - Unable to wait patiently or tolerate delay; restless. Unable to endure irritation or opposition; intolerant.
  50. Impious - Lacking piety and reverence for a god/gods and their followers.
  51. Impish - Naughtily or annoyingly playful.
  52. Incompetent - Unable to execute tasks, no matter how the size or difficulty.
  53. Indecisive - Characterized by lack of decision and firmness, especially under pressure.
  54. Indifferent - The trait of lacking enthusiasm for or interest in things generally, remaining calm and seeming not to care; a casual lack of concern. Having or showing little or no interest in anything; languid; spiritless.
  55. Infamy - Having an extremely bad reputation, public reproach, or strong condemnation as the result of a shameful, criminal, or outrageous act that affects how others view them.
  56. Intolerant - Unwilling to tolerate difference of opinion and narrow-minded about cherished opinions.
  57. Judgemental - Inclined to make and form judgements, especially moral or personal ones, based on one’s own opinions or impressions towards others/practices/groups/religions based on appearance, reputation, occupation, etc.
  58. Klutz - Clumsy. Blunderer.
  59. Lazy - Resistant to work or exertion; disposed to idleness.
  60. Lewd - Inclined to, characterized by, or inciting to lust or lechery; lascivious. Obscene or indecent, as language or songs; salacious.
  61. Liar - Compulsively and purposefully tells false truths more often than not. A person who has lied or who lies repeatedly.
  62. Lustful - Driven by lust; preoccupied with or exhibiting lustful desires.
  63. Masochist - The deriving of sexual gratification, or the tendency to derive sexual gratification, from being physically or emotionally abused. A willingness or tendency to subject oneself to unpleasant or trying experiences.
  64. Meddlesome - Intrusive in a meddling or offensive manner, given to meddling; interfering.
  65. Meek - Evidencing little spirit or courage; overly submissive or compliant; humble in spirit or manner; suggesting retiring mildness or even cowed submissiveness.
  66. Megalomaniac - A psycho pathological condition characterized by delusional fantasies of wealth, power, or omnipotence.
  67. Naïve - Lacking worldly experience and understanding, simple and guileless; showing or characterized by a lack of sophistication and critical judgement.
  68. Nervous - Easily agitated or distressed; high-strung or jumpy.
  69. Non-violent - Abstaining from the use of violence.
  70. Nosey - Given to prying into the affairs of others; snoopy. Offensively curious or inquisitive.
  71. Obsessive - An unhealthy and compulsive preoccupation with something or someone.
  72. Oppressor - A person of authority who subjects others to undue pressures, to keep down by severe and unjust use of force or authority.
  73. Overambitious - Having a strong excessive desire for success or achievement.
  74. Overconfident - Excessively confident; presumptuous.
  75. Overemotional - Excessively or abnormally emotional. Sensitive about themselves and others, more so than the average person.
  76. Overprotective - To protect too much; coddle.
  77. Overzealous - Marked by excessive enthusiasm for and intense devotion to a cause or idea.
  78. Pacifist - Opposition to war or violence as a means of resolving disputes. (Can double as a merit in certain cases)
  79. Paranoid - Exhibiting or characterized by extreme and irrational fear or distrust of others.
  80. Peevish - Expressing fretfulness and discontent, or unjustifiable dissatisfaction. Cantankerous, cross, ill-tempered, testy, captious, discontented, crotchety, cranky, ornery.
  81. Perfectionist - A propensity for being displeased with anything that is not perfect or does not meet extremely high standards.
  82. Pessimist - A tendency to stress the negative or unfavourable or to take the gloomiest possible view.
  83. Pest - One that pesters or annoys, with or without realizing it. Nuisance. Annoying. Nag.
  84. Phobic – They have a severe form of fear when it comes to this one thing. Examples: Dark, Spiders, Cats
  85. Practical - Level-headed, efficient, and unspeculative. No-nonsense.
  86. Predictable - Easily seen through and assessable, where almost anyone can predict reactions and actions of said person by having met or known them even for a short time.
  87. Proud - Filled with or showing excessive self-esteem and will often shirk help from others for the sake of pride.
  88. Rebellious - Defying or resisting some established authority, government, or tradition; insubordinate; inclined to rebel.
  89. Reckless - Heedless. Headstrong. Foolhardy. Unthinking boldness, wild carelessness and disregard for consequences.
  90. Remorseless - Without remorse; merciless; pitiless; relentless.
  91. Rigorous - Rigidly accurate; allowing no deviation from a standard; demanding strict attention to rules and procedures.
  92. Sadist - The deriving of sexual gratification or the tendency to derive sexual gratification from inflicting pain or emotional abuse on others. Deriving of pleasure, or the tendency to derive pleasure, from cruelty.
  93. Sadomasochist - Both sadist and masochist combined.
  94. Sarcastic - A subtle form of mockery in which an intended meaning is conveyed obliquely.
  95. Sceptic - One who instinctively or habitually doubts, questions, or disagrees with assertions or generally accepted conclusions.
  96. Seducer - To lead others astray, as from duty, rectitude, or the like; corrupt. To attempt to lead or draw someone away, as from principles, faith, or allegiance.
  97. Selfish - Concerned chiefly or only with oneself.
  98. Self-Martyr - One who purposely makes a great show of suffering in order to arouse sympathy from others, as a form of manipulation, and always for a selfish cause or reason.
  99. Self-righteous - Piously sure of one’s own righteousness; moralistic. Exhibiting pious self-assurance. Holier-than-thou, sanctimonious.
  100. Senile - Showing a decline or deterioration of physical strength or mental functioning, esp. short-term memory and alertness, as a result of old age or disease.
  101. Shallow - Lacking depth of intellect or knowledge; concerned only with what is obvious.
  102. Smart Ass - Thinks they know it all, and in some ways they may, but they can be greatly annoying and difficult to deal with at times, especially in arguments.
  103. Soft-hearted - Having softness or tenderness of heart that can lead them into trouble; susceptible of pity or other kindly affection. They cannot resist helping someone they see in trouble, suffering or in need, and often don’t think of the repercussions or situation before doing so.
  104. Solemn - Deeply earnest, serious, and sober.
  105. Spineless - Lacking courage. Cowardly, wimp, lily-livered, gutless.
  106. Spiteful - Showing malicious ill will and a desire to hurt; motivated by spite; vindictive person who will look for occasions for resentment. Vengeful.
  107. Spoiled - Treated with excessive indulgence and pampering from earliest childhood, and has no notion of hard work, self-care or money management; coddled, pampered. Having the character or disposition harmed by pampering or over-solicitous attention.
  108. Squeamish - Excessively fastidious and easily disgusted.
  109. Stubborn - Unreasonably, often perversely unyielding; bull-headed. Firmly resolved or determined; resolute.
  110. Superstitious - An irrational belief arising from ignorance or fear from an irrational belief that an object, action, or circumstance not logically related to a course of events influences its outcome.
  111. Tactless - Lacking or showing a lack of what is fitting and considerate in dealing with others.
  112. Temperamental - Moody, irritable, or sensitive. Excitable, volatile, emotional.
  113. Theatrical - Having a flair for over dramatizing situations, doing things in a ‘big way’ and love to be ‘centre stage’.
  114. Timid -Tends to be shy and/or quiet, shrinking away from offering opinions or from strangers and newcomers, fearing confrontations and violence.
  115. Tongue-tied - Speechless or confused in expression, as from shyness, embarrassment, or astonishment.
  116. Troublemaker - Someone who deliberately stirs up trouble, intentionally or unintentionally.
  117. Unlucky - Marked by or causing misfortune; ill-fated. Destined for misfortune; doomed.
  118. Unpredictable - Difficult to foretell or foresee, their actions are so chaotic it’s impossible to know what they are going to do next.
  119. Untrustworthy - Not worthy of trust or belief. Backstabber.
  120. Vain - Holding or characterized by an unduly high opinion of their physical appearance. Lovers of themselves. Conceited, egotistic, narcissistic.
  121. Weak-willed - Lacking willpower, strength of will to carry out one’s decisions, wishes, or plans. Easily swayed.
  122. Withdrawn - Not friendly or Sociable. Aloof.
  123. Zealous - A fanatic.

its weird having symptoms that seemingly contradict at first. like i really rarely have interest in other people’s lives and i’m just not able to care about them much, but at the same time, i still desperately need their approval and am scared of what they think of me and what they might do behind my back.

it’s a lot more difficult to build relationships that you paradoxically need when you’re not naturally inclined to do the things that are considered the building blocks of them, (e.g, message people frequently, engage emotionally, etc) 

A white guy’s thoughts on “Get Out” and racism

This weekend, I went to see a horror movie. It got stuck in my head, and now I can’t stop thinking about it—but not for any of the reasons you might think.

The movie was Jordan Peele’s new hit Get Out, which has gotten rave reviews from critics—an incredible 99% on Rotten Tomatoes—and has a lot of people talking about its themes.

First of all, I should tell you that I hate horror movies. As a general rule, I stay far, far away from them, but after everything I’d read, I felt like this was an important film for me to see. This trailer might give you some inkling as to why:

Creepy, huh? You might know writer/director Jordan Peele as part of the comedy duo Key & Peele, known for smartly tackling societal issues through sketch comedy. Get Out is a horror movie, but it’s also a film about race in America, and it’s impressively multilayered.

I left the theater feeling deeply disturbed but glad this movie was made. I can’t say any more without revealing spoilers, so if you haven’t seen the movie yet and you don’t want to have the plot spoiled for you, stop reading now and come back later.

Seriously, this is your last chance before I give away what happens.

Okay, you were warned. Here we go.

Our protagonist is Chris Washington, a young black man who has been dating Rose Armitage, a young white woman, for the last four months. She wants him to meet her family, but he’s hesitant. She acknowledges that her dad can be a little awkward on the subject of race, but assures Chris that he means well.

After unnerving encounters with a deer (echoes of The Invitation) and a racist cop, Chris and Rose arrive at the Armitages’ estate. On the surface, the Armitages are very friendly, but the conversation (brilliantly scripted by Peele) includes a lot of the little, everyday, get-under-your-skin moments of racism that people of color have to contend with: Rose’s dad going on about how he voted for Obama, for instance, and asking how long “this thang” has been going on. Chris laughs it off to be polite, though he clearly feels uncomfortable.

There’s a fantastic moment here, by the way, when Rose’s dad offhandedly mentions that they had to close off the basement because of “black mold.” In the midst of the racially charged atmosphere of the conversation, it’s nearly impossible not to take this as a racial remark, and Chris certainly notices, but what could he possibly say about it? Black mold is a real thing; his girlfriend would surely think he was crazy and oversensitive if he said it sounded racist. Chris never reacts to the remark, but that one tiny moment is a reminder to the audience of a real problem people of color often face, when racism can’t be called out without being accused of “playing the race card” or seeing things that aren’t there. (Incidentally, it turns out that the basement is actually used for molding of a different sort.)

There are other reasons for Chris to be unsettled: The only other black people on the estate are two servants, Georgina and Walter (Rose’s dad says he knows how bad it looks, but that it’s not what it seems), and something is clearly “off” about them. Later, more white people show up—and one more black character, and he, too, feels “off.”

By the end of the film, we learn the horrible secret: Rose’s family is kidnapping and luring black people to their estate, where they’re being hypnotized and psychologically trapped inside themselves—Rose’s mom calls it “the sunken place”—so that old or disabled white people’s consciousnesses can be transplanted into their bodies. The white people are then able to move about, controlling their new black bodies, with the black person’s consciousness along for the ride as a mere “passenger.” In a shocking twist, it turns out that even apparently-sweet Rose is in on the plot, and Chris must fight her and the rest of her family to escape.

This isn’t a “white people are evil” film, although it may sound that way at first, but it is a film about racism. I know many of my friends of color will connect with this movie in a way I can’t, so I won’t try to say what I think they’ll get out of it. I do want to say how I connected with it, though, because I think what Jordan Peele has done here is really important for white audiences. 

If you look beyond the surface horror-movie plot, this film actually gives white people a tiny peek at the reality of racism—not the epithet-shouting neo-Nazi kind of racism that white people normally imagine when we hear “racism,” but the “Oh it’s so nice to meet you; I voted for Obama” kind of racism, the subtle othering that expects people of color to smile and get along and adopt white culture as their own whenever they’re around white people.

So many of the moments in Get Out are clearly intended to work on multiple levels. When Chris confronts Georgina about something being wrong and she smiles and says, “No, no no no no no,” with tears streaming down her cheeks, the symbolism is blatant. How often do people of color have to ignore the subtle indignities they face and hide their true emotions in order to avoid coming across as, for example, “the angry black woman/man”? How many times do they find themselves in social situations—even with their closest white friends!—where people make little comments tying them to an “exotic,” supposedly monolithic culture, where they have to respond with a smile and a laugh instead of telling people how stupid and offensive they’re being? 

I can’t tell you the number of these stories I’ve heard from my friends, and I’m quite sure that the stories I’ve heard are only a tiny fraction of the stories that could be told. So there’s something in that moment that speaks volumes about the experiences of people of color in America.

The same is true for so many other moments. The black characters Chris meets at the Armitages’ have all symbolically given up their identities and conformed to white culture; when Chris meets one character, he turns out to be going under a new name, with new clothes and new mannerisms; when Chris offers him a fist bump, he tries to shake Chris’s fist. Again, within the story, there’s an explanation for all this, but every moment here is also about assimilation and culture differences. 

For me as a white audience member, all of these moments did something remarkable: They showed me my own culture—a culture I’m often blissfully unaware of because it’s all around me—as something alien. They reminded me that I, too, have a culture, and that expecting everyone else to assimilate to my culture is just as much an erasing of their identities as it would be to expect me to assimilate to someone else’s culture.

And that’s a big part of what Get Out is about—the erasing of identities, and the power of racism to destroy people. I think it’s really significant that racism is portrayed here very differently from how it’s normally portrayed in movies written by white people. In most Hollywood movies, you know a character is racist because they shout racial epithets or make blatant statements about a certain race’s inferiority. That allows white audiences to say, “I would never do/say that, so I’m not racist!” We really don’t want to think we are.

But notice something important about Get Out’s treatment of racism: This is a film about the literal enslavement of black people—racism doesn’t get more extreme than that—and yet Peele doesn’t go for the obvious by having the white characters admit that they think black people are inferior; instead, they subjugate and dehumanize people by claiming to admire things about them. They turn them into fashion accessories. 

When Chris asks why only black people are being targeted for this procedure, the response is telling: It’s not (supposedly) because the white characters think African Americans are bad, but rather, because they like certain things about them and they want “a change” for themselves. They want to become black—it’s trendy, we’re told!—but without having had any of the actual life experiences or history of African Americans. White people need to see this: to experience the ways in which Chris is othered by people who tell him all the things they like about him—isn’t he strong? Look at those muscles! Does he play golf like Tiger Woods? And he must be well-endowed and have such sexual prowess, right, Rose?

The white people in the audience need to be reminded that just because you’re saying positive things about someone doesn’t mean you’re not being racist, that turning someone into an exotic “other” may not be the same as shouting an epithet, but it’s still taking away someone’s identity and treating them as a commodity.

The film is filled with these kinds of moments. When we realize that Rose’s white grandmother has inhabited the body of Georgina, the fact that she keeps touching her own hair and admiring herself in the mirror takes on a whole new level of significance. (White people, please don’t ask to touch your black friends’ hair.) When Chris connects with a dying deer on the side of the road and later sees a deer head mounted on the wall at the Armitages’ estate, the symbolism is hard to miss. Black people are being turned into trophies in this house. And, oh yeah, they’re being literally auctioned off—as they were in real life in the not-too-distant past.

One day, I’d like to see the film again to pick up on all the ways things read differently the second time through. I noticed several things in retrospect that gain new significance once you know the ending, and I’m sure there’s a lot I didn’t notice. For example, Rose’s dad says he hired Walter and Georgina to care for his parents, and when his parents died, “I couldn’t bear to let them go.” The first time you see the film, it sounds like the “them” is Walter and Georgina. But in retrospect, it’s clear the “them” he couldn’t bear to let go was his parents, so he sacrificed Walter and Georgina for them. Which, again, is an example of how the supposed care of the white characters for the black characters (his care for Walter and Georgina, Rose’s care for Chris) is really all about caring for themselves and treating the black characters as completely interchangeable objects.

The message of the film isn’t simply that the black characters are “good” and the white characters are “bad.” There are presumably—hopefully—many good white people in the world of this film, and many others who wouldn’t do what the Armitages are doing but also probably wouldn’t believe Chris or make the effort to stop it. Peele’s mother and wife are both white, so he’s clearly not trying to paint all white people as villains. 

But I admit, as a white guy, I really, really wanted Rose to be good. I’ve been the white person in an interracial relationship introducing my black boyfriend to my family. I’ve been that. So I related to Rose, and I really wanted to believe that she was well-intentioned and just oblivious; even though she misses the mark on several occasions, there are times that she seems like she gets it and she really does listen to Chris. When a cop asks to see Chris’s ID early in the film even though he wasn’t driving, Rose stands up against the obvious racism, showing us all what it looks like for white people to do the right thing. “That was hot,” Chris says to her later, and I thought, yeah, that’s who I want to be.

So I have to admit, it was really upsetting to me to see Rose, the only good white character left in the film, turn out to be evil. But I realized that part of that is that I really wanted her to represent me, and that’s really the point. Just think how often horror films have only one black character who dies early on, and how many films of all genres have no significant black characters for audience members to look up to or identify with. I think it’s really important for white audiences to experience that.

As I’ve reflected on the film, it seems to me like there are three kinds of popular movies about people of color. There are those that feature POC characters that are essentially indistinguishable from the white characters—as if they just decided to cast Morgan Freeman instead of Tom Hanks without giving any thought to the character’s race. Then there are the movies that deal with racism, but in a way that allows white people to feel good about ourselves, because we’re not like the characters in the film. (This is especially true for movies about racism in the past; some of them are very important films, like Hidden Figures, which I loved, but we need to be aware that it’s still easy for white America to treat it as a feel-good film and think that we’re off the hook because we no longer have separate restrooms.) And finally, there are movies that focus more directly on the lives of people of color but tend to draw largely audiences of color; not many white people go see them, because we think they’re not “for us” (even though we assume films about white people are for everyone).

Get Out isn’t any of those. It’s drawing a broad audience but it’s not afraid to make white people uncomfortable. And if you can give me, a white guy, a chance to have even a momentary fraction of an experience of the real-life, modern-day, casual racism facing people of color in America, I think that’s a very good thing.

I love Hamilton, but something about the way white fans engage with the musical really bothers me: a lot of them are posting in the tag about the actual, historical revolutionaries and founding fathers in a way that makes them seem like funny, sweet, good people. They weren’t. I don’t just mean “Jefferson was a piece of shit”: none of them were good. Every one of their asses saw black people as inferior, even if not all of them supported slavery. All of them participated in genocidal policy against indigenous peoples. If you’re watching/listening to Hamilton and then going out and romanticizing the real founding fathers/American revolutionaries, you’re missing the entire point.

Hamilton is not really about the founding fathers. It’s not really about the American Revolution. The revolution, and Hamilton’s life are the narrative subject, but its purpose is not to romanticize real American history: rather, it is to reclaim the narrative of America for people of colour. 

Don’t romanticize the founding fathers and the revolution. They’re already romanticized. It’s been done. Your history books have already propagated those lies. The revolution is romanticized as an American narrative because it was a revolution lead by and for white men. Their story is the narrative of the nation and it is a narrative from which people of colour are utterly obliterated. 

Do you understand what it’s like to live in a nation where you are made marginal and inconsequential in the historical narrative that you are taught from your first day of school? In the Americas, to be a person of colour is to be made utterly inconsequential to the nation’s history. If you are black, your history begins with slavery, and your agency is denied; they don’t teach about slave rebellions or black revolutionaries. You learn about yourself as entirely shaped by outside forces: white people owned you, then some white people decided to free you and wasn’t that nice of them? and then you’re gone until the civil rights movement. That is the narrative they teach; in which you had no consequence, no value, no impact until less than a century ago. If you are indigenous, you are represented as disappeared, dead, already gone: you do not get to exist, you are already swallowed by history. If you are any other race, you are likely not present at all. To live in a land whose history is not your own, to live in a story in which you are not a character, is a soul-destroying experience.

In Hamilton, Eliza talks, in turn, of “taking herself out of the narrative” and “putting herself back in the narrative.” That’s what Hamilton is about: it’s about putting ourselves in the narrative. It puts people of colour in the centre of the damn narrative of the nation that subjugates them; it takes a story that by all accounts has been constructed to valourize the deeds of white men, and redefines it all. 

Why was the American Revolution a revolution? Why were slave revolts revolts? Why do we consider the founding fathers revolutionaries and not the Black Panthers or the Brown Berets or any number of other anti-racist revolutionary organizations? Whose rebellion is valued? Who is allowed to be heroic through defiance? By making the founding fathers people of colour, Hamilton puts people of colour into the American narrative, while simultaneously applying that narrative to the present. Right now, across the United States, across the damn world, people are chanting “black lives matter.” Black people are shutting down malls and highways, demanding justice for the lives stolen by police, by white supremacy. And all across the world, indigenous people are saying “Idle No More,” blockading pipelines, demanding their sovereignty. And “No One is Illegal” is chanting loud enough to shake down the walls at the border; people are demanding the end of refugee detention centres, demanding an end to the violence perpetuated by anti-immigration policies. People of colour are rising up. 

…And white people are angry about it. White people are saying “if blacks don’t want to get shot by the police they shouldn’t sag their pants”; saying “get over it” about anti-indigenous policies of assimilation and cultural genocide and land theft; Jennicet Gutiérrez was heckled by white gay men for demanding that president Obama end the detention of undocumented trans women of colour. White people see people of colour rising up and they tell us to sit down. Shut up. Stop making things difficult. The American Revolution was a bunch of white men who didn’t want to be taxed, so white history sees their revolutionary efforts as just; they killed for their emancipation from England; they were militant. That, to white people is acceptable. But those same white people talk shit about Malcolm X for being too violent–a man who never started an uprising against the government leading to bloodshed. Violence is only acceptable in the hands of white people; revolution is only okay when the people leading the charge are white. 

Hamilton makes those people brown and black; Hamilton depicts the revolution of which America is proud as one led by people of colour against a white ruling body; there’s a reason King George is the only character who is depicted by a white man. The function of the visual in Hamilton is to challenge a present in which people of colour standing up against oppression are seen as violent and dangerous by the same people who proudly declare allegiance to the flag. It forces white people to see themselves not as the American Revolutionaries, but as the British oppressors. History is happening, and they’re on its bad side.

So don’t listen to or watch Hamilton and then come out of that to romanticize the founding fathers. Don’t let that be what you take away from this show. They’re the vehicle for the narrative, and a tool for conveying the ideologies of the show, but they are not the point. Don’t romanticize the past; fight for the future. 

An Analysis of Bakugou’s Superiority Complex

I think you’re at least kind of right. Bakugou knows Midoriya has something that he lacks, and that causes him to feel bitterness towards Midoriya. It’s also hard for Bakugou to deal with the idea that Midoriya is more like All Might than he is. Although, I don’t Bakugou ever admired Midoriya back when Midoriya was Quirkless. I think he hated Midoriya because Midoriya makes him feel weak.

I think Bakugou’s hatred of Midoriya comes from him having a textbook case of superiority complex.

A superiority complex is “a psychological defense mechanism in which feelings of superiority counter or conceal feelings of inferiority.” In other words, Bakugou’s narcissism and feelings of superiority are due to him trying to cover for his inferior feelings. When Bakugou is feeling weaker than Midoriya in some cases, he’ll lash out against Midoriya and treat him as inferior in order to protect his feelings of weakness. Whether Midoriya realizes it or not, he picks on Bakugou’s insecurities, and, in order to protect his ego, Bakugou bullies Midoriya and tries to make himself feel superior.

I don’t think Bakugou’s superiority complex has always existed. I think Midoriya simply triggered it.

From when he was a young child, Bakugou has always been praised.

As his mom points out, all that praise for his talents has made him narcissistic.

Bakugou’s feelings of superiority come from all the praises during his childhood. That much is self-explanatory. Because of those praises, he has high expectations for himself.

Because Bakugou was praised for his Quirk and Midoriya had no Quirk, it was easy for Bakugou to come to the conclusion that Midoriya is inferior.

As a result, when Midoriya, someone who’s supposed to be beneath him, tries to help him, it’s a huge blow to Bakugou’s ego. Midoriya is supposed to be a Quirkless loser. Bakugou isn’t supposed to need his help.

Any time Midoriya tries to help Bakugou, it makes Bakugou feel weak. In order to feel less weak and to prove his superiority, he bullies Midoriya and brings him down. A superiority complex exists to cover for an inferiority complex. In Bakugou’s case, his inferiority complex comes from Midoriya making him feel weak and like he has lower self-worth. His superiority complex kicks in when he bullies and brings Midoriya down in order to feel stronger. If Bakugou can keep convincing himself that Midoriya is weak and that he’s superior, then Bakugou can feel strong. The weaker Midoriya is, the stronger Bakugou feels. It’s a vicious mindset that Bakugou develops over the years, and he can’t get over this mindset and acknowledge Midoriya’s strength easily.

Bakugou’s superiority complex is so bad that he even considers losing if it means not having to work with Midoriya. Working with Midoriya is just that big of a bruise to his ego, and it makes him feel stronger thinking Midoriya is not good enough to work with him.

He still has to mentally think Midoriya is a piece of shit even while working with him.

Bakugou has gotten into this mindset where he has to prove he’s better than Midoriya in order to make himself stronger. Midoriya makes him feel weak. In order to combat those feelings, Bakugou has to put Midoriya down.

Midoriya getting a Quirk from All Might and catching up to Bakugou in terms of ability makes Bakugou feel weak. That’s why he can’t accept Midoriya’s strength so easily. Midoriya is supposed to always be beneath Bakugou. When he catches up to Bakugou, that only pisses Bakugou off because that’s not the way it’s supposed to be. It’s a failure on Bakugou’s part to allow Midoriya to catch up to him.

Once Bakugou realizes Midoriya received All Might’s power, he thinks that means there must be something Midoriya has that Bakugou doesn’t. Midoriya did something right while Bakugou did something wrong. Since All Might chose Midoriya, a kid who was always weaker than Bakugou, it makes Bakugou feel weak. This aggravates his inferiority complex. Bakugou feels so weak that he blames himself for getting captured by the villains and leading to All Might’s downfall.

It doesn’t help Bakugou’s inferiority complex when he feels like Midoriya is always looking down on him. He hates it when people do that.

Just a reminder, if people feel weak or incompetent and they let that consume themselves, then they have an inferior complex.

An inferior complex isn’t always conscious. In Bakugou’s case, it was initially subconscious and then became more conscious after All Might lost his powers. His inferiority complex is aggravated by anyone who makes him feel weak. Midoriya especially makes it worse. However, other people have aggravated Bakugou’s inferiority complex as well.  

If someone stands against Bakugou, Bakugou wants that person to give it his or her all. If that person doesn’t, to Bakugou, that person is looking down on him and making him feel weak.

Todoroki does just that during the Sport’s Festival.

Bakugou’s superiority complex isn’t the only defense mechanism for his inferiority complex. Often he just gets REALLY PISSED OFF against the people who make him feel weak. For instance, this is what he’s like after his fight with Todoroki.

Bakugou also shuns anyone who makes him feel weak, like Todoroki for example.

There are other smaller examples of other students picking on Bakugou’s inferiority complex. Midoriya and Todoroki are just the big examples.

Not everyone with a superiority complex is as destructive as Bakugou. In fact, out of all the students with an inferiority complex, Bakugou seems to cope with it the worst since he hurts others in the process.

Aoyama is a milder example someone with of a superiority complex. Remember, a superiority complex is simply a defense mechanism for an inferiority complex.

People, like Aoyama, who feel insecure about themselves and let that insecurity consume them have an inferiority complex.

To cope with the inferiority complex, they act more superior. Although, in Aoyama’s case, instead of tearing people down like Bakugou, he simply boasts himself, tries to get attention, and acts like he’s amazing.

Aoyama acts like he loves himself, and he loves the attention. There could be an argument to be made that Aoyama doesn’t have a superiority complex since he doesn’t bring others down in order to make himself feel superior. However, he boasts how amazing he is, gets dramatic, and seeks attention as a way to cope with his feelings of inferiority.

Right now, Bakugou and Aoyama are the only students I can think of who have developed a superiority complex from their inferiority complex.

There are certainly other students who have an inferiority complex. It’s inevitable given the nature of being a hero. Being a hero is very competitive. In order to be successful, students need to stand out from their peers, and their peers in turn will will use their weaknesses against them. Villains also take advantage of any weakness students may have. It makes sense for students to feel like they’re inadequate compared to the amazing talent of their peers or to feel like they’re not as strong as they should be.

Interestingly enough, it doesn’t really look like Midoriya has an inferiority complex. An inferiority complex occurs when people become too focused on their deficiencies and start to feel intense lower self-worth. Midoriya doesn’t have that. Midoriya has usually been pretty pragmatic about his weaknesses and doesn’t let them make him think he’s inadequate or worth less.

Bakugou’s bullying never caused Midoriya to give up or feel worth less. Midoriya has always thought Bakugou is amazing. As a result, Bakugou became a role model for Midoriya instead of someone who pushes him down.

Hearing that Togata could have been the successor for One for All and that Nighteye thinks Togata would make a better successor doesn’t make Midoriya think he is unworthy of One for All. Midoriya still thinks he’s worthy of One for All and will push himself to prove it.

Keep in mind, Midoriya not having an inferiority complex does not mean he isn’t sometimes humble or hard on himself. He’s not cocky. He will have moments where he doesn’t take credit for his achievements or is disappointed in himself. That’s part of human nature. 

Here, Midoriya is giving others credit for his achievements. 

When he says this, he’s not saying he doesn’t deserve to be where he is or that he’s not deserving of his Quirk. He’s simply giving people who have helped him throughout is life credit. He wants to be the number one hero for their sake as well as his own. That’s not an inferiority complex. 

During the moments Midoriya is hard on himself, it’s usually because it’s the rational conclusion, such as in the example shown below. 

All Might tells Midoriya that he can only use to five percent of his power. Midoriya reasonably thinks that doesn’t sound like a lot. Midoriya isn’t being unreasonably hard on himself or thinks he’s weak. He’s just coming to the rational conclusion based on what he knows. Midoriya knows he needs to work on controlling his Quirk without breaking his bones. Midoriya feeling like he has a lot to work on doesn’t mean he thinks he’s a lesser being or has low self-esteem. 

People having moments where they’re hard on themselves or think they can do better is normal. An inferiority complex is when those inferior feelings happen all the time whether subconsciously or not. Bakugou often feels weak, and this manifests into the angry and mean-spirited behavior we know. Bakugou always subconsciously or consciously thinks he’s weak. It’s a more general feeling rather than one that happens occasionally. Midoriya doesn’t always think he’s not good enough or not deserving. If he’s not good enough in a certain area, then he’ll come to the rational conclusion for that particular area. An inferiority complex is a general feeling of inferiority rather than the occasional moments of feeling inferior. It makes people feel like they’re worth less overall. It’s a neurotic condition, meaning people with an inferiority complex worry frequently about their inferiority, even when it’s irrational or not important. The negative attitudes at times are irrational. 

Take Momo’s inferiority complex for example. She is very sensitive to her shortcomings from the Sports Festival. She is very hard on herself for not living up to her high expectations. She even goes as far as saying she “hasn’t left behind any noteworthy results.” Even though Momo is a very rational thinker, this is a VERY harsh criticism on her part and has affected her attitude since then. 

Momo’s negative feelings about herself occur when she compares herself to Todoroki. She starts feeling not good enough and loses confidence in herself. An inferiority complex affects the general perception and behavior one has towards himself or herself. 

Her inferiority complex prevents her from speaking up about a plan because she thinks she’s not good enough to share her idea. 

She thinks so little of herself that she comes to the conclusion that if Todoroki’s plan didn’t work, then hers can’t work either. 

An inferiority complex affects the behavior of individuals. In Momo’s case, hers makes her more passive because she feels like she’s not good enough to voice her opinion. In Aoyama’s case, it makes him more self-centered in order to compensate for his inferior feelings. In Bakugou’s case, it makes him become a bully because bringing people down makes him feel more superior. 

Midoriya not having an inferior complex makes sense. Midoriya is supposed to be Bakugou’s foil. Bakugou’s weaknesses are supposed to be Midoriya’s strengths.

If both boys have an inferiority complex, then they don’t make that good of foils. While Bakugou has feelings of weakness that he lets consume him. Midoriya doesn’t let his flaws make him feel weak or insecure and tries to push himself to be number one anyway because he believes he’s worthy of being number one.

Keep in mind, not everyone with an inferiority complex lets it hold them back or has harmful ways to cope with the inferiority complex like Bakugou does. An inferiority complex is simply a constant feeling of being inadequate and not measuring up. Some people with an inferiority complex use it to improve the skills they think they lack. It can be a driving force to improve. Bakugou, in a way, has also used his inferiority complex to improve himself. Unfortunately, he also tries to handle his feelings of weakness by lashing out and bringing others down.

The worst way to cope with an inferiority complex is to develop a superiority complex from it. People with a superiority complex still have low self-esteem like others with an inferiority complex. However, they also bring down others in order to cope with their low self-esteem and end up being isolated from people as a result.

ibtimes.com
Fat-Shaming And Body-Shaming, A History: Author Talks Thigh Gaps, 'Dad Bods' And Why We Hate Fat
Amy Farrell, author of "Fat Shaming," explains why we mock overweight people.

This article is really good and informative. It talks about the history of fat hate and diet culture, as well as it’s origins in among middle-class white people. It explains how Fat was the evil antagonist, the sign of an uncivilized and “primitive” body and linked with “scientific” racism that [attempted] to prove that African people and indigenous people were inferior. I’m not surprised fat hate started with white people. They seem to be the root of all evil. 

-Mod Mariah 

To all the Muslim, Jewish, Christian, Hindu, Buddhist, Sikh, Jain, and other religious sapphic women of color out there:

  • You are not betraying your god. 
  • You are not any less religious or devout simply because you are sapphic. 
  • You are not a sinner. You are not unholy. You are not unworthy. 
  • Your god loves you. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.
  • You have every right to access safe religious spaces as anyone else. 
  • You have every right to be proud in both your religion and your sexual/romantic orientation. 
  • You are not broken. 
  • God is not ashamed of you. God did not mistakes with you. 
  • Do not blame yourself. You are not inferior to other people in your community. 
  • You are allowed to partake wholly in religious events without anyone stopping you. You are allowed to be open about everything, and you are allowed to be secretive. 
  • You do not have to prove anything to anyone. God knows the extent of your religiousness. You do not have to answer to anyone else. You are the interpreter of your religion - let no one stop you and let no one dictate to you. 
  • If you are closeted and religious, you are immensely brave. If you are out and religious, you are immensely brave.
  • If you have to contend with people in your religious community looking down upon you because you are sapphic, you are immensely brave. If you have to contend with LGBTQ people being islamophobic, antisemitic, or bigoted toward your religion, you are immensely brave. 
  • You are allowed to be happy, you are allowed to make religion a daily part of your life, and you are allowed to have both religion and your sapphic identity be important parts of you. 

amethyst struggles with feeling inferior to the people around her and they just

fucking

got rid of it

“Oh yeah I don’t feel like that anymore”

WHAT THE FUCK CREWNIVERSE

Edit: Everyone who fucking reblogs this post with that piece of shit response that was fucking shared by Ian JQ himself is getting blocked

this was a fucking PERSONAL POST ABOUT MY DISSATISFACTION WITH A CHARACTER I FUCKING RELATE TO

GO FUCKING JUMP OFF A CLIFF FOR ALL I CARE IM FUCKING SICK AND TIRED OF HAVING PEOPLE TROD ON MY FEELINGS GO KILL YOURSELVES I DONT FUC KING CARE ANYMORE

Ardyn Headcanons

Part of my ongoing Ardyn fic. I posted the first bit a WHILE back, and will be updating it soon(ish). 

  • Ardyn rarely sleeps. Being immortal, he doesn’t need to, and when he does he ALWAYS has a recurring nightmare about a liquid darkness entering and consuming him (he wakes knowing that’s what actually awaits him if he ever loses control, except it will happen from within).
  • The daemons are like a personality disorder. They manifest as impulses and voices in his head, which he can barely distinguish from his own. Over the years he’s managed to quiet them and differentiate, but it’s still a daily struggle. He tries and keeps his emotions in check to prevent them from surfacing.
  • He likes a high shelf brandy. It’s classic.
  • Ardyn has always had a bit of a sweet tooth. People are surprised to discover this; he doesn’t seem the type. Yet as a child and adolescent, the palace kitchen staff were well familiar with and supplied his penchant.
  • He hasn’t felt at home anywhere in Eos since before being exiled. He roams constantly, and knows almost every inch of the world. The only places he feels remotely at home at are the ruins scattered across Eos— the ones that no one can explain, the history long forgotten. These ruins are from before even his time, and he enjoys that there is still something he hasn’t experienced.
  • Aside from a spare change of clothes, some odd souvenirs, and his car, he doesn’t own anything.
  • He doesn’t have a cellphone, and it’s a running joke in Niflheim that the Chancellor is “old-school.” He’s impossible to get in touch with, but he always seems to be in the right place at the right time despite this, so Aldercap and the others leave him be.
  • Ardyn feels an intense loneliness if he allows himself to feel. Not only does he keep to himself, having little in common with anyone and feeling everyone to be inferior, but people are wary of him. He is used to being ignored and shunned, but it’s only made him bitter over the years. Sometimes he finds himself trying to attempt normal interaction, but it rarely goes well. People seem to sense something’s off with him, and this only makes him feel more corrupted / desperate for his end game to come to fruition.
  • Ardyn is tired. Not physically tired, but in his soul. If he isn’t occupied, it strikes him. He has seen and done just about everything over the eons, and no matter how the landscape changes due to natural or human influence, he can feel the familiarity of places in his bones. He is tired of Eos and craves release. He would never admit this, and it’s much easier to pretend that revenge against the Lucis Caelums is the sole reason behind his actions. He’s angry at the gods and Lucians for what was done to him in the past, but mostly he’s angry that he’s had to remain alive for so long— friendless, his soul corrupted, and with the daemons his only true ever-present companions.
  • After his failed execution, Ardyn was placed in the stone tomb on Angelgard by the gods. The imprisonment was three-fold: One, Angelgard is an island, and at that time, his daemonic powers were not known to him / undeveloped (so escape that way was a no-go). Two, the swords / stakes surrounding the tomb were once magically-imbued to keep him from escaping. And three, the narrow window is aligned with the opening in the crag behind the tomb, allowing sunlight to directly enter the tomb and weaken Ardyn due to the daemons in his body (over the years he grew used to the light, but for a long, long time, it pained him, and only darkness brought relief— which is why he grew to resent the light). We don’t hear much of Ardyn through history after his own time period because he was imprisoned. It wasn’t until rather recently that the magic was lost and he could escape. This would also explain how his speech is still fairly archaic.
  • When Ardyn first escaped his prison and “re-introduced” himself to modern society, the idea of having a paid job was abhorrent. He stole and shoplifted to get everything he needed (he did this for years). In his mind, everything was stolen from him, and his own needs outweigh anyone else’s.
  • Ardyn keeps the full extent of his power hidden from everyone. Why? For one, because the more he uses them, the more the daemons have control. Two, because having his powers known would complicate his place in the Empire, and thus his plans. He could easily achieve his goals by being 100% evil and killing everyone until Noct makes his covenants and enters the Crystal, but he isn’t SURE that Noct is chosen until he actually gets pulled into the Crystal.
  • Ardyn does (or did) feel some small shred of pity for Noctis because he’s essentially just a kid who gets screwed by fate as much as Ardyn did, but his resentment over Noct being chosen and able to Ascend (as well as Noct’s bloodline) vastly overwhelms his pity.
  • He gets his clothes custom tailored because he doesn’t like the current fashion trends (and doesn’t feel he needs to adhere to them); because it makes him feel important; and because it reminds him of a time when he had this privilege.
  • His humor and  charm took a while to redevelop (post-imprisonment). At first he was highly self-deprecating, but no one understood his plight or jokes. It wasn’t until he began to try to seem friendly and good-natured that people began to warm up to him and he realized this made it easier to get what he wanted. However, in recent years he’s allowed his contempt to poison the facade and now his “charm” just seems creepy.

One thing guaranteed to make me enraged is watching the rightwing capitalists arguing with the liberal capitalists about whether poor people are just naturally inferior and deficient or if environmental factors make poor people inferior and deficient.

It’s like they can’t even fucking imagine that poor people might be equal and just as fully human as wealthy people and yet somehow still be poor people.  Or that a situation can be stressful, hard, and damaging without that meaning that people would no longer be in that situation if they would stop acting so traumatized by it.

And yes, liberal capitalists, this does mean I am totally fucking uninterested in hearing your pet theories about how poor people just can’t be sensible and stop being poor because poverty makes our brains stunted or some shit like that.  It’s not substantially different from rightwingers insisting that poor people are genetically inferior, in that both just accept the idea that the poor must be inferior to the rich and must be doing something wrong or we’d no longer be poor.  And in practice both are used as excuses for patronizing social control towards poor people.

seriously why people always wanna talk about how patriarchy affects men

like how do you hear something like “you throw like a girl!” and not realize that while one boy is being teased, literally the entire female sex is being told they suck at physical activity.

how can you look at that and just want to say “see! patriarchy hurts boys!!” No it doesn’t, not systemically. It tries to train them into actually being stronger than women, meaner to women. It teaches them that weak, and stupid are Girl things, and therefore all things girls do are stupid, inferior to things Boys do. How you want to look at that and say “yes, and look how that can hurt boys’ feelings!!” ???

Like no. i don’t wanna talk about boys. I don’t want to hear how their feelings got hurt when they got called a girl, as if their feelings getting hurt somehow overshadows the fact that being female is a shame, an insult, a curse. And I don’t understand why someone would want to make a boy’s feelings a priority in feminism. It’s a side effect, one that can be easily fixed if men wanted to fix it. They could start standing up for women, the women and girls in their life, they could teach their sons that women are not inferior, that the people who use ‘girl’ as an insult are in the wrong. 

But for some reason it has become feminism’s job, women’s job, to take care of boys’ and men’s feelings and comfort them. Just like always. Color me shocked.

hey kids, it’s time for your annual reminder that disabled people aren’t inferior to nondisabled people, that we/our bodies are not useless (nope, not even the disabled parts of our bodies!), and that we probably have a lot of abilities that you lack or haven’t developed as extensively as we have. in general, lots of disabled people are way better than you at so much stuff! so much better than you, oh my god

anonymous asked:

GIVE ME ALL YOUR SAD TSUKISHIMA HEADCANONS HERE. TEAR THAT BOY APART FOR ME BB

《Thank you so much for requesting this, okay. It gets gradually happier as the list goes on, by the way, so the whole thing isn’t a terrible sob fest… ALSO DISCLAIMER TRIGGER WARNING FOR ANYONE WHO IS UNCOMFORTABLE TOWARDS THE TOPICS OF AN ED OF ANY SORT OR SELF HARM》


- Tsukishima would only ever admit his struggles of he was very, very close to you, even then he would have trouble. It’s something he’s very self conscious about, something that still haunts him and lingers in the shadows of his mind. It all started when he was 12, or 13 maybe. Still numb from the tragic betrayal of his brother, he only got more and more distant by the day. Those dark feelings mixed with his arising teenage hormones we’re not a good mix for his overall mental health. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder began eating at him far before an ED even came into play. They conjured up thoughts of failure, thoughts of perfection, and soon enough, everything in Tsukishima’s life had to be perfect, perfect, perfect. He had to get exactly a 100% on his Algebra test, he had to clean his room for exactly 30 minutes, he had to do everything exact. Everyone he was close to had began to think it was just a temporary inferiority complex. People would say, “of course he doesn’t care about that, he’s a teenager” and “teenagers tend to ignore a lot of things” but even if Tsukishima didn’t completely understand the situation he was in, he knew it wasn’t just a ‘teenager thing’. His mother brought him to a psychiatrist once or twice, and despite the fact that he was, in fact, diagnosed, his mother was in denial, and so was everybody else he knew. Of course, his mother meant well, but needless to say, she thought it was just a phase. In real life, not that many people could see past his pretentious persona, but the people who squinted through those translucent walls of his could sense that something was up. Yamaguchi, especially.
Eventually, those thoughts of perfection had moved onto something bigger than grades and friendships, his body. He began counting every calorie he ate, every pound he lost. He had an image in his mind that screamed, “perfection” and he would do anything to achieve that. Numbers were slowly becoming the center of his life, and from the time he woke up, to the time he went to bed, all he could think about was numbers. His OCD and inferiority complex are things that are still prominent in his life, even to this day, but his ED was always something that fluctuated. For a long time, he didn’t even realize he was starving himself, and what he was doing was classified as a very tragic mental problem. It only came to his realization in his last year of middle school in health class, while the teacher was discussing disorders teens had. “Anorexia Nervosa”, a slide up on the board that was colored a putrid green, had gotten his attention, fast. He noticed the faces of some girls, how they looked nervously down at their feet as the teacher continued his rambles. He wanted to reach out to them, ask them if they were ok, but brushed it off. If you had asked him what he thought of that disorder in that moment, he would have said it’s “A stupid feminine issue, and they can rot, for all I care.”
But he really did care.
This word, “Anorexia”, had put the past two years of his life in perspective. It explained everything.
And it hurt.
He still continued his tendencies, growing more and more attached to it now that he knew it was a real, his problem was real and therefore it had meaning. He slowly grew bulimic, as well. When he ate 635 calories instead of his perfect 500, he learned to well, just puke it up. Slowly slowly, Tsukishima started to decay. At 6’0 he was only 125 pounds, and people he knew started growing concerned, but he didn’t care. He only got worse by the day, his forms of self harm growing more and more destructive.
Since then, Tsukishima has healed, but those thoughts of perfection and deterioration still linger on his skin and in his mind. Yamaguchi, although he knows very well of the way Tsukishima thinks, still doesn’t know what went down in middle school, and Tsukishima never intends on letting him know. The only two people who know, besides his family, is Kuroo, Akaashi and Daichi.
Daichi found out when they were changing one day. He noticed the scars on his arm and thighs and couldn’t help but ask, because if there was anything going on with one of his most valuable teammates, he sure as hell was going to fix it. He more or less milked the answer out of him, but now that he knows, he’s a lot more understanding of him than the other teammates. Kuroo found out while they were in gym three. Bokuto had brought some snack into the gym, and while Tsukishima really did heal, scars crack open. The thoughts come scampering back sometimes, and on this day in particular, they flooded his mind. Kuroo, being Kuroo, was oblivious to the situation at hand, teasing him about the fact that he was ‘so skinny’ and ‘really needed that food’. Akaashi, however, was not so simple minded. He had taken note of the way Tsukishima reacted towards things during the time he had spent at the camp. Akaashi’s good at analyzing people, and he analyzed Tsukishima in the same way he does Bokuto. In that moment, Tsukishima wasn’t as pissed as he was upset, and whist Kuroo chased after him in attempts to apologize, Tsukishima spilled.
These thoughts only ever haunt him once or twice every couple months, and they’re never strong enough to consume him. Although, raging thoughts of perfection still dwell in that crowded mind of his. After the Shiratorizawa match, where he said there’s no reason anyone should be proud, for he had only blocked one spike, that was the inferiority. His mind is a hurricane of wanting more, more, more, and not wanting anything at all. He wants to try, he has goals and morals and standards, but insecurity drags those down and makes him think that nothing matters. He’s working on it, he is, but Tsukishima has come to terms with who he is, and changing who he is is something he’s done with doing.

- He’s always cared about volleyball, from the day he met Hinata for the first time to the moment he blocked Ushijima’s spike. Although, despite the many times has he said that “this is just a club” and “what’s the point in trying if somebody’s always going to be better?” he still tries. Although he may not be giving it all like Hinata or Kageyama, he’s still trying. If he really didn’t care, thought of it as just some stupid club, do you think he’d really still be involved? After Akiteru’s betrayal, he could’ve just abandoned it completely. He could’ve easily played basketball, with that height of his, or joined any other club if he wanted to, but he stuck with volleyball. I believe if Yamaguchi were to confront him earlier, ask him “if you didn’t care at all, why are you still here?” he wouldn’t be able to give a proper answer. He says there’s no point in trying if somebody’s always going to be better, but he just doesn’t want to get too attached to it, like his brother was.

- Truth is, he doesn’t like getting close to anything, these days, and that’s why ever since the accident he’s been colder towards Yamaguchi. He doesn’t want to let people or things into his life, because anything that can’t benefit him in any way could hurt him. It happened with his brother, it happened with volleyball. He keeps people out in any way he can. Tsukishima is not an asshole. He wants other people to believe he’s an asshole, though, so they don’t stick around him. When he’s being genuine, he’s shy. When he asks people questions, he has his head down, hands interlaced. He doesn’t like opening up to people, and when he does, he’s vulnerable. He’s been betrayed, and like hell he’s ever going to let anything betray him again.

- Growing up, Kei never had a father. After his mother got pregnant with him, his father disappeared, leaving her to take care of her two boys on her own. Akiteru, being five at the time, was absolutely heartbroken by this. Even if he was five, he understood what was going on, and what was going to happen. Every time his father would leave for work, he’d refer to him as “the man of the house”, and that’s exactly what he was now. His little brother, Kei, was never going to experience having a father, so Akiteru, at five years old, decided that he was going to be the father figure for him, and that’s exactly what he grew up to be. Akiteru was pretty much a mentor for him, a role model, and that’s why he’d lie to his brother, so he’d keep setting “good examples” and trying to be a person who his brother could be proud of. In the end, it was devastating for both of them. Akiteru had lost the most important person in his life, and Kei was facing the betrayal of his superhero.

- It’s very rare that somebody comes along that Tsukishima takes a liking to. Before the whole accident, Tsukishima was already closed off. His brother even scolded him for not getting along with the other kids. Yamaguchi practically dug his way into Tsukishima’s life, and if it weren’t for him confronting the bullies, they would’ve never been friends to begin with. They probably wouldn’t have gone to the same schools, and even if they did, Yamaguchi would most likely get closer to Hinata, than anyone. Besides Yamaguchi, Tsukishima doesn’t really consider himself to have friends. Hinata and Kageyama are just teammates, and like hell he’d associate with them anywhere outside. He talks a great deal to Akaashi, but really it’s only ever about how their teams are doing, more than anything. Bokuto and Kuroo are more like mentors, and he can’t see him getting buddy-buddy with Bokuto, even if he was the one who practically helped him overcome his fear of getting too attached to volleyball. Tsukishima believes himself the next person he gets close to will definitely be his future significant other, because he just can’t see himself making new friends anytime soon.

- He has a ton of marks on his body, self inflicted, and not. He happened to grow a lot during the span of middle school, especially around the time when he had an ED. He had his greatest growth spurts during that time, and with all the chaos of gaining and losing and purging, he got stretch marks. His body was always fluctuating, and because he grew so fast, he was cursed with them on his sides, stomach, and thighs. He doesn’t like them all that much, especially since nobody else on his team has them, but what he really hates, is his scars. He regrets it more than anything, cutting himself, because when he did, he’d cut a lot, and deep. So deep he remembers seeing the white of his flesh in between the wound. Unfortunately, they didn’t heal well at all, the scar tissue a bruising purple and rougher than his skin. They’re mostly on his thighs, but he has a few littered on his hips and forearms, as well. Those ones happened to heal better, practically disappearing at this point, much to his pleasure. During the summer, he’s always a bit self conscious to go anywhere, always fearing that somebody’s going to confront him about them.

- Sometimes, especially late at night, he’ll find himself crying. Every so often he’ll throw himself into a state of existentialism, and question his existence, and everyone else’s existence, for that matter, until he gives himself a headache. He has the tendency to over think things, especially things about himself, and once he starts thinking about something inconvenient, he’ll think about it so much that he freaks himself out, until he needs reassurance that everything will be okay, or else he’ll lose it. Often times, he can assure himself, but he doesn’t believe himself. He knows it’s an annoying habit, but he’ll constantly ask his mother if she hates him, or if he’s doing okay, just because he needs to hear it out loud before believing it himself.

- When he finds himself over thinking, he’ll get out of bed and distract himself. Those dinosaur figurines are pretty much there so he doesn’t kill himself in the middle of the night. More often than not, he’ll get up, rearrange them by period, then order, family genus and species, then alphabetically until he forgets whatever was bothering him in the first place. A lot of times, his overthinking isn’t all that self destructive. When it is destructive, the dinosaurs have no chance at helping him, but when it comes to him just remembering something stupid he said in 6th grade, or a really embarrassing move he made somewhere, the dinosaurs are there to cure what ails him.

- Although he doesn’t really think of himself to be all that great, he likes writing. He has a binder, a big white one that has so many indents on the cover you couldn’t even count, and it’s filled with poems and thoughts and short stories he’s created over the past few years. He keeps his only ones mainly for the fact that he loves embarrassing himself sometimes, but a lot of them are terrifying and show a side of him that no longer exists. A lot of what he writes is just tangents, small narratives that start out neatly written and based on a theme, but end up in violent scribbles and on a topic completely different than the one he started with. It’s a way to get his feelings out without actually having to share them. Although, he might show somebody he loves the binder one day, just so they can get a glimpse at who he was in the past.

- He has hope for himself. He knows he’s still insane and sick in the mind but he’s come to terms with himself, and there’s nothing he wants more than a good future. He wants the rest of his life to be on track; graduate high school, go to a good college, get married, have kids, maybe. He knows eternal happiness is too much to ask for, but he’s just striving to be content. He wants to forever live in the feeling of having that slight weight on his shoulders, but still be able to lean back and say, “I’m free.”

Barry Loukaitis

‘It’s like I pictured myself doing it or something I never really pictured myself doing anything else.’

Date: February 2, 1996

Age: 14

School: Frontier Junior High School. Moses Lake, WA

Killed: 3

Wounded: 1

Outcome: Held class hostage. Overpowered. In prison.

Mrs Loukaitis confided too much in her son. her marriage had fallen apart, and her husband became involved with another woman. Mrs Loukaitis planned to get revenge against her husband and his girlfriend; she wanted to tie them up, tell them how much they’d hurt her, show them that she had a gun, frighten them into thinking she was going to kill them, and then shoot herself. She said, ‘If he didn’t remember my life, I was going to make him remember my death.’ She shared this plan with her son, on the last weekend of January, told him that she was going to kill herself on February 14 because she knew she could catch her husband with his girlfriend. On February 2, just a few days after she told Loukaitis her plan, he committed his school shooting.

Through his elementary school years he was reportedly outgoing and popular. He served on student council in sixth grade, and numerous friends visited his house. In seventh grade he became more withdrawn. His mother said he had a bad temper and would hit walls in anger.

During middle school Loukaitis was arrogant and intimidating. When he crossed paths with his peers, he would ‘curse them, tell them to shut up or order them out of his way.’ He loved the random violence in the movie Natural Born Killers and liked to quote from it. He talked about his desire to kill someone before he died. He was drawn to the idea of murder, saying ‘It would be cool to kill people…to try and get away with it.’

He also felt superior to his peers and viewed murder as a way of eliminating inferior people. He told a female classmate, ‘Some people don’t deserve to live; some people should just die or be killed.’

On February 2, Loukaitis entered his algebra class and shot Manuel Vela, Mrs Caires and two other students. Having shot 4 people, Loukaitis held the class hostage. During this time Loukaitis was said to be at ease. When the police arrived and wanted to negotiate with him, he reportedly was not afraid but annoyed. Loukaitis was apprehended when a teacher ripped the gun from his hands. Once in custody, a detective commented on how unruffled Loukaitis was: ‘He was acting shockingly calm…I expected to see a look of remorse.’ An officer commented that when he read Loukaitis his rights, ‘He looked up at me and cracked a smile and said ‘I know my rights, man.’ After giving his confession, he curled up in his cell and had a nap. Later that day, Loukaitis’s father described him as ‘Vicious. No emotion. Not crying.’

Adapted from ‘School Shooters’ by Peter Langman

Judging oneself to be inferior to other people was one of the worst acts of pride because it was the most destructive way of being different.
—  Paulo Coelho

anonymous asked:

Fandom seems to love the "friends to lovers " trope and its pretty much everywhere with every ship and I hate it so much, it just makes me feel so inferior that people just value romantic relationships more, is it just me ? :/

It’s not just you, anon. I hate it too.

It angers me how like 99% of the time that trope is only used to make it more interesting, not because the friendship is actually adored. It’s just used as a way to “””develop””” the relationship.

Get Out (2017) dir. Jordan Peele

I can’t possible fathom what a white person would get from watching this movie. I’m not even sure if non-black people of color could fully understand this movie. Get Out perfectly captures the anxiety that comes from being the only black person in an area, shit gave me flashbacks. I’m not sure if Asian or Latinx people feel the same sense of unease being around white people, they’re discriminated against too, but my mom has actual pictures of our enslaved family on the plantation, that shit is always on my mind even if it’s not at the forefront. And that’s not even mentioning shit like Emmet Till and The Central Park Five, just being in close proximity to white people could mean prison or a casket, but I’m getting off topic.

Get Out looks way too good and is written way too well to be the debut feature of a comedian. This is like if Brazil were Terry Gilliam’s first film. Get Out has been compared to the works of Dario Argento, Bunuel, and John Carpenter (which I can definitely see during the film’s second half), but personally, the first half of Get Out reminded me of David Lynch. Maybe a Lynch comparison was too obvious for other reviewers, the movie after all does take place in a small suburban town like Twin Peaks and Blue Velvet, but I wanted to point it out because I feel like the similarities go beyond the setting.

Daniel Kaluuya is a fantastic, I love Daniel Kaluuya. His accent slips a few times during the movie, but really, who cares? It’s Daniel fucking Kaluuya, I’ve been a huge fan of his since The Fades (a cancelled BBC show from 2011, it had 6 episodes).

I think what makes Get Out so great it tackles the latent racism and deceit of white liberals/allies not often brought up in mainstream media. The faux-progressivism of modern whites is near identical to the ideologies of white people from centuries past. Take Thomas Jefferson for example, author of the Declaration of Independence and purported abolitionist. He acknowledged that slavery was wrong many times throughout his political career, yet owned HUNDREDS of slaves, only freeing two within his lifetime. And even being self aware enough to know his actions were incorrect, Jefferson still believed that black people were inferior and raped one of his slaves multiple times. Point is, Thomas Jefferson knew that owning other humans (as inferior as they may be) was wrong, but his money eclipsed his morals. You see the same shit today, just look at how many white women voted for Donald Trump, I assure you that all of those women weren’t Republicans. “Liberal” white women who either couldn’t bear the thought of Hillary Clinton being the first female president or weren’t over Bernie losing the nomination voted for Trump because they decided their personal feelings were more important than the lives of minority groups.

Faux-liberalism and fetishization of black bodies is the driving force of Get Out, that’s what the movie is really about. 

The foreshadowing employed is fantastic too, along with the way the story of Chris (Daniel Kaluuya) is interwoven with the story of the film. Get Out is a lot more personal than trailers and commercials let on.