infamy!

Halo Wars 2′s soundtrack has so many incredible pieces…

Barren, The Banishing, It’s Done, Bon Voyage/Bon Chance, Empathy, Infamy, Abolition, Cratered, Fog of War, Dug In, and Legitimate Strategy stand out as some of my favourites - and a couple of them stand with some of my favourite tracks in the entire series.

go buy the soundtrack lads

One Year Since Tattoo Roulette:

Aka Niall’s National Nightmare & Harry Is A Cocky Bastard

Originally posted by amftzayn

Originally posted by insomnia-eyes

Originally posted by prettielou

“I’m actually fine!” YOU COCKY BASTARD! THAT DIMPLE THE SIZE OF THE MOON WHILE YOU LAUGH OFF POTENTIALLY GETTING A TATTOO ON NATIONAL TELEVISION!

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RIP Agent Antoine Triplett (April 20, 1982 - December 9, 2014)

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This is an annotated draft of the speech President Franklin D. Roosevelt delivered to Congress—and the nation—on Dec. 8, 1941, one day after the attack on Pearl Harbor. According to the @usnatarchives, Roosevelt dictated the speech hours after the attack, then handwrote changes.

Note at the top of first page, Roosevelt crossed out “world history” and replaced it with “infamy,” coining the phrase that has lived on in history.

Today, we remember the 75th anniversary of the attacks. 

The Day Before the Attack…

President Roosevelt studied this map on December 6, 1941. The pencil notations indicate the location of a Japanese fleet that was being tracked by British and American officials. It appeared to be headed towards Thailand or British Malaya.

What FDR and these officials did not know was that another Japanese fleet—operating under radio silence—was steaming, undetected, towards Hawaii at the same time.

Doris “Dorie” Miller was born in Waco, Texas in 1919. He was unable to finish high school, but helped around the family farm until just before his 20th birthday. He then enlisted with the Navy as a Messman, one of the few positions open to African-Americans.

On December 7th, 1941, Miller was a Messman Third Class serving on the USS West Virginia. He was a ship’s cook, with minimal combat training and no gunnery training, as the military was still segregated and African-Americans were not trained on the heavy guns.

When the bombs began dropping on Pearl Harbor, Miller ran to the deck of the ship and began assisting moving the wounded, including the captain of the ship. He then jumped on one of the anti-aircraft guns on deck and proceeded to try to shoot the Japanese planes down until ordered to abandon ship, at which point he continued to help move wounded soldiers from the ship.

Miller was hailed as the “Number One Hero” for African-Americans and considered one of the first American heroes of WWII. He was awarded the Navy Cross and after a massive community campaign, went on a war bond tour.

Miller returned to service on the Liscome Bay, where he died when the ship was lost at the battle of Makin Island.

Bonus: Admiral Nimitz, a native of Fredericksburg, Texas and CINCPAC during WWII, pinning the Navy Cross on Dorie Miller.

“Seventy-five years ago today, a sudden and unprovoked attack turned a tranquil harbor into a sea of flames. Over 2,400 American patriots lost their lives in the attack on Pearl Harbor—military and civilian, men, women and children. Their sacrifice galvanized millions of GIs and Rosie the Riveters who answered the call to defend liberty at its moment of maximum peril. In the hours after the attack, President Roosevelt promised that ‘the American people in their righteous might will win through to absolute victory.’ Thanks to the heroism of a generation, we did.

Today, Michelle and I join the American people in remembering those who gave their lives at Pearl Harbor—many of them not much older than boys—and in honoring their families—spouses, siblings, sons and daughters who still carry the memories of their loved ones in their hearts. We give thanks to the veterans and survivors of Pearl Harbor who faced down fear itself, met infamy with intrepidity, freed captive peoples from fascism and whose example inspires us still. For out of the horrors of war, this Greatest Generation forged an enduring international order, became the backbone of the middle class and powered America’s prosperity. Their courage and resolve remind us of that fundamental American truth—that out of many we are one; and that when we stand together, no undertaking is too great.

On this National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, we also reaffirm that the work of securing and strengthening our nation goes on. While we can never repay the profound debt of gratitude we owe to those who served on our behalf, we can embrace our commitment to care for and support veterans of America’s wars from every generation.

As a testament that even the most bitter of adversaries can become the closest of allies, I look forward to visiting the USS Arizona Memorial later this month along with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. This historic visit will stand as a tribute to the power of reconciliation and to the truth that the United States and Japan—bound by an alliance unimaginable 75 years ago—will continue to work hand-in-hand for a more peaceful and secure world.” —President Obama on Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day