industrial architecture

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The Oculus | Santiago Calatrava

Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava’s vast ribbed structure that soars over the World Trade Center Transportation Hub in New York is captured in these images by British photography duo Hufton + Crow. Known as the Oculus, the building is designed to bring light down into the subterranean rail station and shopping centre that quietly opened in March 2016. Glazing in between these elements brings copious amounts of light into the space, which has an open floor surrounded by two levels of shops.

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Inside Rick Owens & Michele Lamy’s Paris Home:

Photo I: Sculpture by Horst Egon Kalinowski in the meeting 

Photo II:  In the library, the couch, triangular stool and shelving all designed by RO

Photo III: A daybed covered in suede with a sable blanket, both by Owens, whose designs are sold through Salon 94 in New York City and Gallerie Pierre-Marie Giraud in Brussels.

Photo IV: An installation of objects on Owens’s desk includes a skull and Roc crystals.

Photo V: Owens’s minimalist shower

Photo VI: A brass-topped table by Owens

Photo VII: The Owens-designed bed is pine plywood covered in cashmere felt.

Photo VIII: Owens leans against a concrete sink in a bathroom he designed.

Photos by. François Halard

Nu snackar vi lägenhet och så otroligt snyggt stylad! Alexander White säljer just nu denna skönhet som ligger i Läderfabriken invid Järla sjö precis söder om Stockholm.

Now we’re talking apartment and so incredibly nicely styled! Alexander White are selling right now this beauty located in Leather Factory beside Järla lake, just south of Stockholm.

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Found Typologies: Bernd and Hilla Becher’s Photographs of Industrial Architecture

German conceptual artists Bernhard “Bernd” Becher and Hilla Becher, who worked together as a collaborative duo, are perhaps best known for their extensive series of photographic images of industrial buildings and structures. The images were often organized in grids according to a particular “typology,” such as water towers, grain elevators, coke ovens, and warehouses. In displaying what might typically be considered “banal” or lacking in design, the Becher’s elevated industrial architecture to subject worthy of formal aesthetic and artistic consideration. The photographs also bring light to an architectural ecosystem based on the production and transformation of energy that is paradoxically both hidden and ubiquitous. The Bechers would go on to influence generations of documentary photographers and artists as the founders of what has come to be known as the ‘Becher school.’