individually italian

anonymous asked:

As someone who has knowledge in the current activities going about, I read you're definition of a fascist, which is plainly wrong about individualism. The anti-individualism is part of the Communist Karl Marx way. It's also, as you forgot to point out, totalitarian, same as communism. The united States is NOT a toltarian government, and that is the MAJOR requirement to be fascist. As well as the alt-right isn't commiting "purges" to beat up the left and torture as the left does.

This is amazing.

1) “ As someone who has knowledge in the current activities going about,”

What does that even mean?  Oh, you “have knowledge?”  So we’re supposed to defer to your authority on the subject, without any explanation of what “knowledge” you have?  WTF does “current activities going about” even mean or refer to???

2)  “ I read you’re definition of a fascist,” 

Oh, you’re (meaning “you are” as opposed to the possessive “your”) talking about our post yesterday that documented some of the aspects of fascism.  OK, we’re following you so far.

3)  “ which is plainly wrong about individualism.”

SAY WHAT SON???

4)  “The anti-individualism is part of the Communist Karl Marx way.”

OK, here are some problems with the “knowledge” you “have:”

a) “ Fascism is therefore opposed to all individualistic abstractions based on eighteenth century materialism;” 
“Anti-individualistic, the Fascist conception of life stresses the importance of the State and accepts the individual only in so far as his interests coincide with those of the State, which stands for the conscience and the universal, will of man as a historic entity.”  
- Benito fucking Mussolini, “The Doctrine of Fascism.”  

Looks like the “knowledge” you “have” conflicts with fascism as described by Il Duce.

Other people who disagree with you about fascism & individualism: Italian historian Emilio Gentile; author and semiotician  Umberto Eco, international relations & geopolitics professor Dimitri Kitsikis; professor Karl Polanyi; historian George L. Mosse; political scientist Robert O. Paxton - suffice to say we could go on.  

But no, let’s not listen to historians, political scientists, and well-respected authors about the anti-individualist nature of fascism; let’s believe some anonymous rando on Tumblr who claims to “has knowledge in the current activities going about” instead.

b) We’re not going to argue about whether or not Marx was anti-individualist, but has it occured to you that more than one political system can be anti-individualist?  Apparently not.

5)  “It’s also, as you forgot to point out, totalitarian” 

We assumed that people would understand that a political system that brought about the ownership of government by one individual or a small group & organized mass murder equates to a totalitarian state.  Evidently we didn’t consider that people like yourself, who have “knowledge in the current activities” might nonetheless have difficulty making inferences on their own.

6)  “The united States is NOT a toltarian government, and that is the MAJOR requirement to be fascist.”

It’s “totalitarian.”  

Although we think it’s becoming a more-arguable point every single day (let us not forget the recent Day of Patriotic Devotion), we never referenced the United States in our post.   You are making a strawman argument and a piss-poor one at that.

7)  “ As well as the alt-right isn’t commiting “purges” to beat up the left and torture as the left does.”

Son, we never mentioned the so-called “alt-right” in our post.  You’re making your 2nd strawman argument in a five-sentence message.  GTFO with that shit.

Oh, actually, wait a second: so fascists aren’t committing purges?
  
You’re making that claim the same week that the Gestapo ICE arrested nearly 700 people in a nationwide series of raids?  

You’re making this claim two weeks after a Muslim woman was attacked at work by a raving Islamophobe

You’re making this claim less than three weeks after a fascist shot ten people in a mosque, killing six of them

You’re making this claim within a month of Donald Trump issuing an executive order barring immigrants, refugees, and even U.S. residents from seven predominantly Muslim countries from entering the United States

But you claim it’s “the left” that beats & tortures people, huh? 

Now please excuse us, we have to get back to our George Soros-funded torture chamber to beat & torture some fascists.

neonhairspray  asked:

A fa of Seb and Mans? Damn, girl, high five! I mean, Mans got be back in 2015, some months before Eurovision and Seb just last year, but still... :D

I know Måns isn’t an actor but I want a film where Måns, Seb and Giacomo Gianniotti play a europop band trying to make it in the world, with choreographed dance routines and also at least one slow ballad where they stand up from stools in sync and do a dramatic air grab and also maybe one of them parties too much and they have to try and save face after they’re hit with a bunch of tabloid scandals and also one of them is gay and the other one uses his money to fund a dog rescue sanctuary

Identity of the African Diaspora: An Evolution of Identifying Terms

The terms used to describe members of the African Diaspora have evolved throughout the last couple of centuries. Identities have taken shape often based on the region in which African descendants currently live. The majority of people, who used to be categorized solely as ‘black’, are in search of a term which identifies them as people who are part of a larger culture and not one that necessarily reflects their race and skin color. 

The modern debate over an identifying name took shape during the African slave trade when the first Africans were shipped to the Americas and the Caribbean. The vast majority of Africans wanted to be referred to as African. However the non-African population referred to Africans either as slaves or free. Thus began the reference to people as an adjective and not a noun. Soon Africans and African descendants rejected the term 'African’ because a negative connotation evolved through the ideas of European descendants. 'African’ came to symbolize a sub-human identity because Africans were seen as 'barbaric’ and 'ape-like’. With the end of the nineteenth century, adjectives started to transform into nouns as identifying terms for African descendants. The term 'Colored’ became customary when describing all people who were 'non-white’. However this was replaced with the term 'Negro’ in the early twentieth century due to the fact that segregation was on a rise and signs above public facilities appeared all over the United States indicating which facility could be used by the 'Colored’ or by the 'Whites’. Segregation fueled racism and the terms, 'Colored’ and 'Negro’, were perceived as racist by the time of the 1950s and 60s’ Civil Rights Movement. Currently the only acceptable use of the term 'Colored’ is in the organizational title of the NAACP (the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People). 

In the 1960s many African Americans were rediscovering their African roots. Hairstyles such as the Afro were becoming popular and slogans such as 'Black is Beautiful’ were chanted by many. “Say It Loud: I’m Black and I’m Proud”, was a song by James Brown which demonstrated the rise of 'Black Pride’ in the 1960s. With this rise of Black awareness, the distinction on who was 'Black’ changed. Although 'Black’ still referred to the color of one’s skin, now it referred only to African descendants and no longer encompassed dark-skinned individuals such as Italians or Mexicans. However, this remained problematic because it referred to anyone originating from African descendants, such as people from the Caribbean, even though these possessed a highly distinct culture. Not all African descendants welcomed the surfacing of the term 'Black’ because they felt it was similar to the term 'Negro’ which was now seen as a racist term. But for the most part many accepted the term 'Black’ and it is still considered acceptable in the USA and other parts of the world today. 

The term 'Afro-American’ developed during the rise of hyphenated terms to describe American minority groups in the 1970s and 1980s. Soon the term evolved into 'African-American’ and finally into 'African American’ with it losing the hyphen. The hyphen was removed because many believed that it implied a sub-category. 'African American’ was adopted quickly by many because many African descendants in the USA did not identify themselves as 'Black’. However, this terminology does not satisfy everyone because many also believe that there is nothing African about them. It is now widely accepted as the politically correct terminology for Americans of African descendant although it is understood that one term cannot contain all the information required to accurately represent a population of over forty million people. 

Today, members of the African Diaspora associate themselves with Africa through the terms with which they identify. Many African descendants believe that the usage of 'African’ when being identified is a way of circling back to their roots of Africa which carried a stigma for a long time. When polled by the online Village forum associated with the Blacknet website, 40% of African descendants living in Great Britain wished to be called African British while almost half that number, 24%, wished to be called Black. Many believe that the English language has oppressed African people by constantly using adjectives instead of nouns when referring to an ethnic group. With the desire to be recognized and connected with their heritage and not described according to their skin color, many prefer the reference to Africa when identifying them. 

Afro-Latinos acknowledge their black identity but do not accept it as a means of identification. Although many people would expect Afro-Dominicans to share the same level of identification with blackness as African Americans do, many Afro-Dominicans believe that being black places them into the same social category which African Americans associate with racism and discrimination. Afro-Latinos in the USA also do not identify with the African Americans. For many Afro-Latinos, African American means that someone is born in the USA with African ancestry and not Hispanic heritage. However, the longer an Afro-Latino remains in the USA, the more likely he/she will identify him/herself as being black just like the African American. 

These diversities and complexities pertinent to members of the African Diaspora make it difficult to claim a common identity. Although many share broad similarities, African descendants do not believe these similarities are enough to associate all under the same umbrella. Every region of the world that African descendants live in has unique aspects for understanding the logic behind the terminology desired by them. History, culture, and political institutions have all been factors which have shaped racial identities throughout the world.

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IGN.Joseph

anonymous asked:

what is your biggest concern about said topic (xenophobia) for the Trump administration?

Our concern at the Japanese American National Museum is that tragic and unlawful events from American history will be repeated, or at the very least, there will be efforts to repeat them. Specifically, we are concerned that the type of registry that was created in 1942 by Presidential Proclamation 2537 will be repeated. This registry required individuals of German, Italian, and Japanese ancestry in the United States to register with the US Department of Justice. These people were not accused of any specific act or crime; there were targeted solely because the countries they or their relatives hailed from were now the nation’s World War II enemies. In recent months, there has been talk of a registry for Muslim Americans and we consider this unacceptable. Law-abiding people would to be subjected to government action for no other reason than their religion.

In 1942, the actions against Japanese Americans didn’t stop with the registry. Presidential Proclamation 2537 was followed by Executive Order 9066, signed by President Franklin Roosevelt on February 19, 1942. This led to the incarceration of 120,000 individuals of Japanese ancestry for the duration of World War II. History ultimately proved that there was no military necessity for this action and in fact, the American government apologized for the incarceration and paid reparations to the survivors. These were results of the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, signed into law by Republican President Ronald Reagan.   

These historical actions were rooted in fear and stoked by xenophobia. We do not want this history to be repeated. The first step in preventing this is to speak out, as the museum and others have, to both raise awareness of this shameful chapter in our nation’s history and to work against the “normalization” of xenophobic rhetoric by our powerful leaders who we think should know better.