indigo & cotton

8

“Let me paint a picture of what’s waiting for you on the shore. You arrive in America, land of opportunity, milk and honey and guess what? You all get to be slaves. Split up, sold off and worked to death. The lucky ones get sunday off to sleep and fuck and make more slaves, and all for what? For cotton? Indigo? For a fucking purple shirt? The only good news is the tabacco your grandkids are gonna farm for free is gonna give a shitload of these white motherfuckers cancer. And I ain’t even started yet.

Let me tell you a story. Once upon a time a man got fucked. Now, how is that for a story. Cause that’s the story of black people in America. Shit you all don’t know you black yet. You think you just people. Let me be the first to tell you that you are all black. The moment these Dutch motherfuckers set foot here and decided they white, and you get to be black, and that’s the nice name they call you. Let me paint a picture of what’s waiting for you on the shore. You arrive in America, land of opportunity, milk and honey, and guess what? You all get to be slaves. Split up, sold off and worked to death. The lucky ones get Sunday off to sleep and fuck and make more slaves, and all for what? For cotton? Indigo? For a fucking purple shirt? The only good news is the tobacco your grandkids are gonna farm for free is gonna give a shitload of these white motherfuckers cancer. And I ain’t even started yet. A hundred years later. You’re fucked. A hundred years after that. Fucked. A hundred years after you get free, you still getting fucked out a job and shot at by police. You see what I’m saying?
—  American Gods

alluringbutterfly  asked:

Do you all know anything about the Gullah people?

Funny story, lol I 1st learned about the Gullah people after watching Gullah Gullah Island as a child (please tell me you remember otherwise i feel old). I didn’t fully understand the culture and motive behind the show until last fall in my African Retentions in American course in college.

So here goes:

The Gullah people are the descendants of the slaves who worked on the rice plantations in South Carolina and Georgia. They still live in rural communities in the coastal region and on the Sea islands of those two states, and they still retain many elements of African language and cultureMany traditions of the Gullah and Geechee culture were passed from one generation to the next through language, agriculture, and spirituality. The culture has been linked to specific West African ethnic groups who were enslaved on island plantations to grow rice, indigo, and cotton starting in 1750, when antislavery laws ended in the Georgia colony.

A Board of Trustees established Georgia in 1732 with the primary purposes of settling impoverished British citizens and creating a mercantile system that would supply England with needed agricultural products. The colony enacted a 1735 antislavery law, but the prohibition was lifted in 1750. West Africans, the argument went, were far more able to cope with the climatic conditions found in the South. And, as the growing wealth of South Carolina’s rice economy demonstrated, slaves were far more profitable than any other form of labor available to the colonists.

Rice plantations fostered Georgia’s successful economic competition with other slave-based rice economies along the eastern seaboard. Coastal plantations invested primarily in rice, and plantation owners sought out Africans from the Windward Coast of West Africa (Senegambia [later Senegal and the Gambia], Sierra Leone, and Liberia), where rice, indigo, and cotton were indigenous to the region. Over the ensuing centuries, the isolation of the rice-growing ethnic groups, who re-created their native cultures and traditions on the coastal Sea Islands, led to the formation of an identity recognized as Geechee/Gullah. There is no single West African contribution to Geechee/Gullah culture, although dominant cultural patterns often correspond to various agricultural investments. For example, Africa’s Windward Coast was later commonly referred to as the Rice Coast in recognition of the large numbers of Africans enslaved from that area who worked on rice plantations in America.

Documentation of the developing culture on the Georgia islands dates to the nineteenth century. By the late twentieth century, researchers and scholars had confirmed a distinctive group and identified specific commonalities with locations in West Africa. The rice growers’ cultural retention has been studied through language, cultural habits, and spirituality. The research of Mary A. Twining and Keith E. Baird in Sea Island Roots: African Presence in the Carolinas and Georgia (1991) investigates the common links of islanders to specific West African ethnicities.

Enslaved rice growers from West Africa brought with them knowledge of how to make tools needed for rice harvesting, including fanner baskets for winnowing rice. The sweetgrass baskets found on thecoastal islands were made in the same styles as baskets found in the rice culture of West Africa. Sweetgrass baskets also were used for carrying laundry and storing food or firewood. Few present-day members of the Geechee/Gullah culture remember how to select palmetto, sweetgrass, and pine straw to create baskets, and the remaining weavers now make baskets as decorative art, primarily for tourists.

Aspects of West African heritage have survived at each stage of the circle of migration, with rice, language, and spirituality persisting as cultural threads into the twentieth century. The Geechee/Gullah culture on the Sea Islandsof Georgia has retained a heritage that spans two continents. Sapelo Island Cultural DayAt the end of the Civil War, lands on the coastal islands were sold to the newly freed Africans during the Port Royal Experiment, part of the U.S. government's Reconstruction plan for the recovery of the South after the war.

During the 1900s, land on some of the islands—Cumberland, Jekyll,Ossabaw, Sapelo, and St. Simons —became resort locations and reserves for natural resources. The modern-day conflict over resort development on the islands presents yet another survival test for the Geechee/Gullah culture, the most intact West African culture in the United States. Efforts to educate the public by surviving members of the Geechee/Gullah community, including Cornelia Bailey of Sapelo Island and the Georgia Sea Island Singers, help to maintain and protect the culture’s unique heritage in the face of such challenges.

The Gullah/Geechee have arguable preserved the heritage of their African ancestors better than any group in the United States.


Cornelia Bailey, with Christena Bledsoe, God, Dr. Buzzard, and the Bolito Man: A Saltwater Geechee Talks about Life on Sapelo Island (New York: Doubleday, 2000).

Margaret Washington Creel, A Peculiar People: Slave Religion and Community-Culture among the Gullahs (New York: New York University Press, 1988).

Oh she long dead. She wouldn’t give it up for Johannes up there so he threw her off the boat. Did you know your momma couldn’t swim? You all need to work on that. Take swimming lessons, this is how we get stereotypes.

You want help?
Fine.
Let me tell you a story.
Once upon a time, a man got fucked. Now, how is that for a story? ‘Cause that’s the story of black people in America! Shit, you all don’t know you black yet. You think you just people. Let me be the first to tell you that you are all black. The moment these Dutch motherfuckers set foot here and decided they white, and you get to be black, and that’s the nice name they call you…

Let me paint a picture of what’s waiting for you on the shore. You arrive in America, land of opportunity, milk and honey, and guess what? You all get to be slaves. Split up, sold off, and worked to death. The lucky ones get Sunday off to sleep and fuck and make more slaves, and all for what? For cotton? Indigo? For a fucking purple shirt? The only good news is the tobacco that your grandchildren are gonna farm for free is gonna give a shitload of these white motherfuckers cancer. And I ain’t even started yet. 
A hundred years later. You’re fucked.
A hundred years after that. Fucked.
A hundred years after you get free, you still getting fucked out a job and shot at by police. You see what I’m saying?

This guy gets it. I like him. He’s getting angry. Angry is good. Angry gets shit done. You shed tears for Compé Anansi, and here he is, telling you you are staring down the barrel of three hundred years of subjugation, racist bullshit, and heart disease. He is telling you there isn’t one goddamn reason you shouldn’t go up there right now and slit the throats of every last one of these Dutch motherfuckers and set fire to this ship!

You already dead, asshole. At least die a sacrifice for something worthwhile. Let the motherfucker burn! Let it all burn!

—  Mr Nancy, American Gods
Did you know your momma couldn’t swim? You all need to work on that. Take swimming lessons. This is how we get stereotypes…
You want help? Fine. Let me tell you a story. Once upon a time a man got fucked. Now how is that for a story? ‘Cause that’s the story of black people in America.
Shit, you all don’t know you black yet. You think you just people. Let me be the first to tell you that you are all black. The moment these Dutch motherfuckers set foot here and decided they white, and you get to be black, and that’s the nice name they call you…Let me paint a picture of what’s waiting for you on the shore. You arrive in America, land of opportunity, milk, and honey and guess what? You all get to be slaves. Split up, sold off and worked to death. The lucky ones get Sunday off to sleep and fuck and make more slaves, and all for what? For cotton? Indigo? For a fucking a purple shirt? The only good news is the tobacco your grandkids are gonna farm for free is gonna give a shitload of these white motherfuckers cancer. And I ain’t even started yet.
A hundred years later. You’re fucked. A hundred years after that. Fucked. A hundred years after you get free you still getting fucked out a job and shot at by police. You see what I’m saying?
This guy gets it. I like him. He’s getting angry. Angry is good. Angry gets shit done.
— 

Mr. Nancy, American Gods

This scene walked up and punched me in the face and it was the most incredible thing I’ve ever seen. This is transcribed straight from the subtitles because the writing is incredible, the only tragedy being it loses Orlando Jones’ Fucking Incredible acting. Can we preemptively give him an Emmy? Or all of them?

Ainu robe of attusi (attush) type, sewn of cloth woven from elm bark (ohyo) fibers with cotton appliqué and decorated with embroidery. The collar of white cotton with indigo embroidery in a check motif, the ties of Edo Period Japanese grey cotton kimono fabric dyed in tsutsugaki technique. With two areas of old repair, one on the back and the other on the front. Edo Period, 19th century, Hokkaido, Japan.

The Akha migrated from China to Laos, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam over the past 200 years. Some of their villages can be found today in the far north of Laos, primarily Phongsaly and Luang Namtha provinces. Traditionally living in more upland areas, some Akha communities can be very remote.

While they used to be also called the Ko or Iko, these names are now considered impolite. The Akha comprises many different sub-groups and clans, who have maintained very strong identities and lifestyles.

Though the Akha do not have a written script, men are able to recite their genealogy going back over 60 generations. This has helped to maintain the Akha identity and history that links clans and families.

Akha villages can be easily recognized by their gates and large swings. The gate is considered a marker between the human and spirit worlds. It is believed to protect the village from outlaws, wild animals and disease. Visitors should never touch it. The village swing is used during the harvest festival in August or September, a time of fun and celebration.

Akha women are famous for their silver headdresses that come in different shapes and designs, depending on the Akha group, and can be very expensive. The Akha Djepia, for instance, wear a cone-shaped headdress, while the Akha Pouly headdress is more rounded, with a flat disc at the back. The Akha also wear indigo-dyed cotton clothing, decorated with embroidery, applique-work and beads.

Photographer: Tim Draper

When you have a mouth for the first time in vorns and you know you gotta stuff as much fuckin candy in there as possible before you have to shift back into your true form

Ainu robe of ci-karkar-pe type, sewn of hand spun, indigo-dyed, striped cotton cloth, decorated with dark indigo, cotton cloth appliqué, couching in white and scarlet cotton thread, and very broad chain-stitch embroidery. Meiji Era, late 19th century, Hokkaido, Japan.

5

etsyfindoftheday 3 | 1.24.17

shibori-dyed home goods by graygreengoods

shibori-dyed goods are created using a traditional japanese technique of folding and binding fabric — both this indigo succulent pot and grey triangle flag garland employ that specific technique. i’d love to add both of these uniquely beautiful items to our modern, minimalist home decor.

3

Casual Friday

Just another simple outfit today. I felt like wearing my leather jacket and built the outfit around it. The jumper is indigo-dyed cotton but is warm enough and adds a little texture and shell cordovan boots are always good with denim,

Jacket - RRL

Bandanna - Kapital

Jumper - Saturdays NYC

Jeans - Orslow 107 One Wash

Socks - Uniqlo

Boots - Carmina

Japanese Fireman’s Coat with Matoi (Fire Banner)

Japanese reversible fireman’s coat (haten) of indigo dyed cotton with tsutsu-gaki (wax resist) and painted decoration. The exterior with chidori (plover) and wave motif, the interior with large matoi (fire banner), used to mark a nearby fire and direct a brigade where to meet. The heavy cotton coat with sashiko stitch designed to retain water after being soaked. Decorated examples such as this became fashionable during the late Edo period and were heavily influenced by tattoo art, which was popular among firemen. The interiors were displayed during ceremonies or on the way home after successfully fighting a fire.