indigenous-land

I came across this poster on Queen St. West in Toronto and I couldn’t look away. Posters such as these, strategically placed around the city are pushing people to question Canada’s dark, colonial history, as is the incredibly critical art being produced by Indigenous artists such as Kent Monkman and Rebecca Belmore. These artists, activists, thinkers and interventionists are destabilizing and dismantling biased, historical Canadian narratives.

In the decade or more of being in Canada, I have recently had the opportunity to establish close allyships with Indigenous friends. Through their research and lived experiences, I am learning about a side of Canada that I was not initially aware of. While the Canadian Citizenship book discusses our shameful history of residential schools, it presents a watered down version, summarized in undignified, short lines, mostly ending with, “Canada has since apologized.”

The abuse that was carried out on Indigenous children at these schools (the last residential school closed in 1996) was horrific and conveniently left out of textbooks. With more awareness around the topic, Canada’s internationally positive reputation is being challenged. Canada’s deputy minister of Indian Affairs Duncan Campbell Scott was quoted in 1920 to have said: “Our object is to continue until there is not a single Indian in Canada that has not been absorbed into the body politic.”

While an apology by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is a start, it is not enough. After all, actions speak louder than words. Grave injustices have been committed against Indigenous people. Erasure of language, culture and customs so as to benefit and serve colonial systems of oppression, unsolved cases of thousands of missing, murdered Indigenous women, increased likelihood of sexual assault on Indigenous women, an alarmingly high suicide rate amongst Indigenous youth and deplorable living conditions in some parts of Canada where Indigenous people reside. By deplorable I mean run down schools and homes and no access to clean, drinking water. How can we justify this while being one of the wealthiest countries in the world with a global reputation for excellence in living standards and human rights?

Far too often I hear fellow immigrants from my own community refer to Indigenous people as “drunks” and “criminals.”

“Oh these natives, they’re such a menace to Canadian society.”

“They get so much funding from the government. All their schooling is paid for.”

“They should be grateful and move on from the past. Look at the state of poor people in the third world countries we come from.”

“These people don’t know the first thing about oppression. They take all the money the government gives them and waste it on drugs and alcohol.”

It is ironic to see new immigrants settle on Canadian land while demonizing and othering the original custodians of this land.

Indigenous people have been dealing with institutionalized racism, discriminatory legislation and federal under-funding for over 100 years. As we mark our 150th birthday as a nation today, I hope that we can work toward addressing these important and urgent issues. Indigenous people are bearing the brunt of genocidal, colonial policies while the rest of us immigrating to Canada are reaping immense benefits such as world class healthcare and education, services that many of our Indigenous communities lack full access to. Our indifference and lack of awareness around these pressing matters has dire consequences for First Nations, Metis and Inuit people of Canada.

Today, on Canada’s 150th, I am stating a land acknowledgment for the first time in all these years of living, working, giving to and taking from Canadian land.

***I wish to acknowledge this land on which I currently reside and work. For thousands of years it has been the traditional land of the Huron-Wendat, the Seneca, and most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit River. Today, this meeting place is still the home to many Indigenous people and I am grateful to have the opportunity to work on this land. (Please correct me if I have stated this land acknowledgment inaccurately)

As a tribal daughter of the Indigenous Magsi clan in Balochistan, Pakistan, I stand in solidarity with my Indigenous brothers and sisters in Canada.

I wish you a safe, peaceful and more informed #Canada150 long weekend.

On indigenous land, Trump wants a pipeline and Turnbull wants a coal mine.

That is, Turnbull just announced he’s gonna change the Native Title Act so it can’t be used to stop the Adani coal mine. This happens a lot. Whenever the Native Title Act helps give Indigenous people power to stop destructive government projects, the government just amends the Act to disempower them again. It’s a weak law.

The world over, stopping climate change, stopping fossil fuels and empowering Indigenous people are deeply linked.

violaslayvis submitted:

I would like to submit my friend Shay, a bi black trans scholar & organizer in Chicago. From his website http://decolonizeallthethings.com: “I’m Shay Akil McLean (twitter.com/Hood_Biologist), I’m a Pan Africanist (Nkrumah Toureist/scientific socialist) & anti-colonial community organizer (on & offline). I’m a Transman of African descent on stolen Indigenous land, writer, public intellectual, human skeletal biologist & sociologist.

I’m a sociologist & biological anthropologist studying STS/HASTS, bioethics, medical ethics, philosophy of biology, genomics, health, knowledge production and medicine. As a scholar I study how systemic inequity results in the differential distribution of health, illness, quality of life, and death. I’m currently working on my PhD in Sociology, specializing in STS/HASTS, genomics, & bioinformatics.

My academic work includes studying the impact of social, political, & economic inequality on human skeletal biology. My Master’s work looked at the impact of food insecurity, high poverty, & racial residential segregation on the dental health of poor Blacks in the 4th poorest city in the U.S..  It is through this work that I aim to construct community based grassroots interventions that change the marginalized’s relationships to knowledge and power to strategically gain equitable access to the very resources that heavily impact disease risk & life determinants while also resisting the ever present processes of settlement and displacement.”

He consistently provides invaluable knowledge on both on his website & his twitter so any donations at http://cash.me/ShayAkil would go directly towards a black trans person.

3

Dr. Adrienne Keene (@NativeApprops):

[TWEET #1: I hope every women’s march and solidarity rally around the US tomorrow has incorporated meaningful participation from local Indigenous women.

TWEET #2: Wherever you are in the US, you are on Indigenous land. True solidarity and resistance can’t start without that recognition. #WomensMarch

TWEET #3: No justice on stolen land.]

On this July 1st, this “Canada Day”, this “150th anniversary”, here’s your reminder that “Canada” is trash and not worth celebrating.

The “Fathers of the Confederation” acted out of economic and geopolitical interests and “Canada” was not founded on the interests nor the voice of anyone but the bourgeois’.

Hundreds of underpaid Chinese workers died building a transcontinental railway that ran through indigenous lands, violating the treaties. Reminder that the Québécois are as insensitive as any other white people when they call a certain meal “pâté chinois”. Reminder that the Québécois are settlers too and that past oppression does not excuse us.

In less than a decade in the late 19th century, Cree, the Niitsítapi, the Nakoda, the Métis and the Sioux, to name a few, dealt with the extinction of bisons, famines, diseases and persecutions. In 1881 the Saskatchewan Herald mocked them for starving in the streets. The Canadian government then sent in more guns to defend the food supply, than food.

The RCMP and the Canadian police departments have a history of violence against Indigenous people (and specifically Indigenous women), people of colour, leftists, and the LGBTQIA2S communities. “Canada” purged thousands of queer people from the government and the army between the 1950s and the 1990s. Despite it being continuously shown as a cute symbol of “Canada”, the RCMP represents colonialism, capitalism and patriarchy.

Tens of thousands of Indigenous children were taken away from their homes, their land, their families, their culture and their language to “take the Indian out of them” in residential schools. The last one closed in 1996. Reminder of the ongoing, historical, intergenerational trauma of colonialism and racism.

Thousands more Indigenous children were taken away from their homes between the 1960s and the 1980s and given to strangers’ families. Thousands still live in foster care today, away from home.

The deadly trains still go through the town of Lac-Mégantic (and many more towns), despite the 2013 fire and the lost lives and the trauma, as a false compromise for pipelines.

The Canadian army takes part in various wars, in Afghanistan, Libya, Syria. “Canada” sells tanks to Saudi Arabia.

White Canadians love to make fun of, co-opt, appropriate and folklorize other people’s cultures.

White Canadians relish in images of great mountains, white snow, strong rivers and mighty winds in books, poems, plays, music, paintings; they relish in an idea of the “True North” that was never theirs. They willingly take part in the destruction of nature for economic interests anyway.

Justin Trudeau (as if his family name alone wasn’t a red flag) is a liberal; his PR team should not fool us; he keeps promising without delivering; his speeches and symbolic gestures are not enough, and he keeps approving detrimental policies just like his predecessors.

Indigenous people are not an artefact or a relic from the past; speaking of them in the past tense only serves white people’s interests and embarrassment.

The people of Attawapiskat are still in a state of emergency and have yet to see any promise fulfilled, more than one year after 9 people attempted suicide on a single day.

The Inuit in Nunavut, as well as Indigenous peoples in Alaska and Greenland, are punished and marginalized nationally and internationally for seal hunting. Sealing is a traditional and necessary practice in the north.

There are still hundreds (if not thousands) of missing and murdered Indigenous women whose cases are ignored or unsolved.

Water protectors exist in “Canada”, too. Many communities don’t even have access to clean water or electricity.

There are currently Indigenous activists on Parliament Hill, which is situated on unceded Algonquin land. Canadians and the Canadian media are currently afraid of a tipi.

PM Trudeau sat in the tipi last night, while protesters could not enter it and many were arrested on the site.

Many other protests, demonstrations, drum circles, prayers and road blocks are being held around the country. Reminder that violence is as legitimate as peaceful protest in the face of colonial violence.

Reminder that land is not property, that it is not mine, and that us settlers are uninvited and occupiers. We live comfortably at the expense of a land that we distabilize, plunder, poison, drown, starve.

Reminder that Canada is a society rooted in colonial, capitalist, patriarchal and racist ideologies that should not be celebrated.

Sources will follow when I have access to my laptop.

Listen y'all, I love witches… but if, as a witch, you don’t stand up for:

* Black Lives
* Indigenous Lives (& Lands)
* The Disabled
* The LGBTQ+ community
* Muslims
* And all people who are marginalized here (in the US) and abroad
(All of whom have shaped this community in one way or another)

Then I don’t think you understand what it means to be a witch. Argue all you want, rationalize hate or apathy, I don’t care. I just hope one day you will see that there is power in empathy and decency.

If anyone is near Kamloops, BC, my university Thompson rivers university is hosting a panel discussion with indigenous land/water defenders in regards to the fight against oil pipelines. There’s some big names presenting (I recognize a few of them).

It’s a free event, and is happening this Monday, February 6th.

cosmopolitan.com
Here's the Full Transcript Of Angela Davis's ~Fire~ Women's March Speech
"History cannot be deleted like web pages."

“At a challenging moment in our history, let us remind ourselves that we the hundreds of thousands, the millions of women, trans-people, men and youth who are here at the Women’s March, we represent the powerful forces of change that are determined to prevent the dying cultures of racism, hetero-patriarchy from rising again.

"We recognize that we are collective agents of history and that history cannot be deleted like web pages. We know that we gather this afternoon on indigenous land and we follow the lead of the first peoples who despite massive genocidal violence have never relinquished the struggle for land, water, culture, their people. We especially salute today the Standing Rock Sioux.

"The freedom struggles of black people that have shaped the very nature of this country’s history cannot be deleted with the sweep of a hand. We cannot be made to forget that black lives do matter. This is a country anchored in slavery and colonialism, which means for better or for worse the very history of the United States is a history of immigration and enslavement. Spreading xenophobia, hurling accusations of murder and rape and building walls will not erase history.

"No human being is illegal.

"The struggle to save the planet, to stop climate change, to guarantee the accessibility of water from the lands of the Standing Rock Sioux, to Flint, Michigan, to the West Bank and Gaza. The struggle to save our flora and fauna, to save the air—this is ground zero of the struggle for social justice.

"This is a women’s march and this women’s march represents the promise of feminism as against the pernicious powers of state violence. And inclusive and intersectional feminism that calls upon all of us to join the resistance to racism, to Islamophobia, to anti-Semitism, to misogyny, to capitalist exploitation.

"Yes, we salute the fight for 15. We dedicate ourselves to collective resistance. Resistance to the billionaire mortgage profiteers and gentrifiers. Resistance to the health care privateers. Resistance to the attacks on Muslims and on immigrants. Resistance to attacks on disabled people. Resistance to state violence perpetrated by the police and through the prison industrial complex. Resistance to institutional and intimate gender violence, especially against trans women of color.

"Women’s rights are human rights all over the planet and that is why we say freedom and justice for Palestine. We celebrate the impending release of Chelsea Manning. And Oscar López Rivera. But we also say free Leonard Peltier. Free Mumia Abu-Jamal. Free Assata Shakur.

"Over the next months and years we will be called upon to intensify our demands for social justice to become more militant in our defense of vulnerable populations. Those who still defend the supremacy of white male hetero-patriarchy had better watch out.

"The next 1,459 days of the Trump administration will be 1,459 days of resistance: Resistance on the ground, resistance in the classrooms, resistance on the job, resistance in our art and in our music.

"This is just the beginning and in the words of the inimitable Ella Baker, ‘We who believe in freedom cannot rest until it comes.’ Thank you.”

mattykinsel  asked:

Was any first nations land ever stolen by the government? It's weird to think about historically because the treaties were mutual and signed by both parties right? They agreed to it. But the govt also created Canada without the consent of indigenous peoples either so like. But maybe that was stipulated in the treaties anyways because it wasn't their land anymore, you know? So like idk here ...

All of Canada exists on stolen land either directly stolen or through broken treaties. Even on unceded territory Canadian governments continue to use indigenous lands without consent. Kinder Morgan’s oil pipeline goes directly through unceded FN territory in BC.

And, yes the government of Canada is responsible for this land theft.

DAPL looms with Trump’s support. This means a continued legacy of stolen land and poisoned water. This means genocide.

The single easiest and most impactful thing you can do this very week: divest your money from DAPL.

The one thing the backers of pipeline projects care about is money!

SPEAK THEIR LANGUAGE

Step 1: Find a credit union or a bank that doesn’t support pipelines (Amalgamated Bank in New York just for example… but I love my Credit Union!! see if you can sign up for a credit union through your job! Shop around!

Or find local Black-owned banks and credit unions to support through a simple Google search!!)

Step 2: Close your account with banks supporting DAPL and Energy Transfer Partners (BofA, Citi, Chase, Wells Fargo, TD, pretty much all the big ones).

If you’re of a dramatic disposition, make a spectacle out of it! Film it! At the very least do take pictures and post them on social media #bankexit #nodapl #defundDAPL

Step 3: contact your branch representative and let them know exactly why you closed your account, because you can’t be a part of funding genocide, trampling Indigenous Land Rights, and causing irreparable damage to our air, water, wildlife, and climate.

Encourage them to see the light and invest in clean green energy projects, which are the future.

Again, what these people understand is money. Make investments in Fossil Fuel a losing proposition!

Step 4: Log on to DefundDAPL.org, where they are keeping track of how much money is being divested, and enter your total!! Every little bit helps!

Step 5: Keep fighting! Stay tuned! Keep learning!

And keep environmental racism and indigenous rights, from Flint to Standing Rock and beyond at the center of your environmentalism! 💥