indigenous american women

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Indigenous women of Standing Rock issue heartbreaking plea for help ahead of evacuation

  • With just over a day to go before the evacuation deadline arrives at North Dakota’s Oceti Sakowin camp, protesters at the Standing Rock Indian Reservation have issued a plea: Come help — now.
  • In a viral video shared by journalist Shaun King on Monday, a group of indigenous women remind viewers that demonstrations against the Dakota Access pipeline are about much more than a single issue.
  • They’re about clean water, police brutality, treaty rights and the rights of future generations. Read more (2/21/17 8:00 AM)

follow @the-movemnt

I once read in a book for class that Native American women are the least represented demographic in US media. I don’t want this to be true in the sapphic community as well.

Here’s to Native wlw who aren’t recognized or acknowledged at all in the media or the community.

Here’s to the Native wlw who are rejected for their dark skin, fierce features, and anything else that should be revered for their defining traits that unify a nation of people.

Here’s to the mixed Native wlw who are rejected for being white passing, too black, too anything and “not enough” Native. Your identity is real and valid.

Native wlw are glorious and important and deserve love in a community meant to uplift those who are forgotten by the rest of the world.

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In a country where about 40 percent of people self identify as indigenous, the National Indigenous Queen of Guatemala contest carries great prestige. In contrast to mainstream beauty pageants, the contestants for the Rabin Ajaw title, aged 14 to 26, have to demonstrate proficiency in their native language, Mayan traditions and worldview; awareness about mining and other threats to Mayan livelihood and resources; a nuanced view of gender roles; and leadership in their community.

The 19th century style Afghani wooden box camera used by the photographer meant that the women had to sit still for several minutes gazing into the camera, enabling a depth of engagement rarely achieved with today’s hectic technology.

Photographer: Rodrigo Abd

#DearNonNatives: Don’t call yourself a feminist if you’re going to ignore the missing and murdered Indigenous women in this country, or the 1 in 3 Native women who were sexually assaulted, or the white washed and hypersexualized images of Native women in the media.
The Aila Test

Originally posted by uber52


I’ve decided to create a test inspired by the Bechdel Test that is exclusive for only Indigenous / Aboriginal female characters and the name is inspired by the character Aila from Rhymes For Young Ghouls.


If there is an Indigenous/Aboriginal woman in a film/comic/book/video game/etc, she passes the Aila Test if she meets these requirements:

1. She is a main character.
2. Who doesn’t fall in love with a white man.
3. And doesn’t end up raped or murdered (especially to push said white man’s storyline)


Please reblog and share with characters who pass the test. 

@feminismandmedia @angrynativefeminists @nativepeopleproblems

So when you say things like “Native Americans have a responsibility to teach [non Natives] their myths and legends and culture!!!” so you can shift the responsibility of being racist on the people you’re targeting, this is what you’re really saying:

In order for you to “understand why we’re so upset with you,” we are expected to talk about, in detail, every single aspect of our struggle for survival, again.

We are expected to talk about ethnic cleansing, genocide, war, colonialism, sexual violence, residential schools, forced assimilation,  the kidnapping of our children, skyrocketing suicide rates, cultural appropriation, racist stereotypes, our women going missing and being found murdered, again.

We are expected to talk about our personal experiences with racism from our partners, our friends, our friends’ family members, our teachers, our employers, our co-workers, acquaintances, online communities, fandoms, entire industries, pop culture icons, government officials, and even the lateral violence within our own communities, again.

We are expected to spell out, in detail, as to what our family members of the previous generation survived in order for us to be here, again.

We are expected to relive our trauma, again.

With all of the information already available for you on the internet that’s a mere Google search away, you expect us to start from square one all over again with no regard for the toll it takes on our hearts, just so you can ignore it AGAIN.

Excuse me, but fuck you.

Indigenous Women and the Fur Trade

Indigenous women in the fur trade have often played a very silent role in terms of the historic narrative. They often go nameless, with their main contributions being said to essentially be:
-Marrying fur traders and granting them access to kinship networks.
-Being the mothers and grandmothers to the Metis peoples. 
But this is not a good view of their important role in the fur trade, because it completely neglects a very distinct and important part of it: Agency. 
Indigenous women in the fur trade displayed in multiple ways their agency, which can be seen through the primary and secondary documents about this fur trade history.

Keep reading

SUNDAY: Indigenous women poets, writers, and musicians explore the power of language, story, and song in today’s fight for environmental and cultural justice. With a focus on the Standing Rock Resistance, Words for Water is a call to action and awareness around protection of sacred sites, cultures and languages, and our water, air, and earth. Featuring Natalie Diaz, Jennifer Foerster, Joy Harjo, Toni Jensen, Layli Long Solider, Deborah Miranda, and Laura Ortman and contributions by Heid E. Erdrich and Louise Erdrich. Tickets at whitney.org. Can’t make it? We’ll be streaming the event live on our Facebook page.

[Photograph of Standing Rock by Natalie Diaz]

Songs My Brothers Taught Me (2015)
dir. Chloe Zhao

1. Is she a main character? YES.

2. Does this character fall in love with a white man? NO.

3. Does this character end up raped or murdered at any point during the story? NO / NO

JaShaun Winters from Songs My Brothers Taught Me passes The Aila Test