External image



We prepared for 8 months for this moment, to pitch this game to the public and see if we can drum up enough interest to help us get the budget we need to get the project rolling. More info about the Kickstarter soon. 


External image

Pumpkin-Online is a Harvest-Moon / Animal Crossing inspired mmo currently in development by indie game company, Pumpkin Interactive, we need a lot of support to make this happen so please follow, and spread the word about us


Hey Dreamwalkers! Didn’t get to see us at a convention this year but want to get on our mailing list for all the latest updates for Sanctum Polis - Rest Eternal Memory? Don’t worry! You can still sign up HERE.

People that sign up will receive the latest updates for the Sanctum Polis - REM Video Game and be the first to know when our demo is released, when our Beta is live, Kickstarter info and more!

Sketch Concepts By: Rumz

The Pros and Cons of Publishing with a Small Press

The great publishing question… Traditional or self-published?

We all want to land a huge publisher so we can sit back on our laurels, but anyone who’s thrown their hat into the ring knows it’s a hard road to being accepted… and an even harder one negotiating a contract that gives you decent royalties, plus enough control over how your book is edited, what cover it’s given, and how it’s advertised.

On the flipside, being self-published is easy, but when it comes to hiring a cover artist, managing social media, holding marketing campaigns, trying to get into your audience’s ever-changing mind… You feel like giving up, and even if you don’t, there’s no guarantee you’ll make it out alive.

But who said it was an either-or?

There’s a third option for those putting the final touches on their manuscripts: A small press. Authors like Carolyn Mathews, author of Transforming Pandora, used a small press to benefit from the experience of a large publishing company and the control of going it alone. This middle ground means you don’t have to grovel or bash your head in.


  • You Have a Whole Team of Eyes

You’ve read self-published stuff before and you know what I’m about to say. Some of it is utter BBQ’d garbage, and unfortunately no one had the heart to tell them so. There are also some books with excellent potential, but who never really reached it. No author is safe from this mistake. Whether it’s bad typesetting or glaring plot holes, nothing is more valuable than an honest and objective eye to make sure your book really is as good as you think.

With a small press, you don’t have to cross your fingers and hope for the best. You have an entire team of eyes on your work to ensure every comma is in the right place, the chapter structure isn’t confusing, and that your character hasn’t suddenly switched personalities with someone else. This gives you peace of mind that the work you send out into the world really is the best it can be, with plenty of insights to back you up.

  • Fewer Start-Up Costs

With self-publishing, the costs are high. You have to hire a proofreader, an artist to create a cover, a typesetter, someone to critique your work, and someone to manage your social media (if you’d rather not do it yourself). That’s not including the price of printing and distributing, purchasing advertisement, etc., etc. You have to spend money to make money, and while the reader might only spend a few dollars for your book, you have to spend a notable amount to create something worth reading and then getting it in their hands.

With a small publisher, these expenses are theirs, and they also have the connections to ensure the money goes to the most profitable places. In some cases, your small press may negotiate for you to contribute to the cost of publication, but in any case, choosing the right publisher will ensure you get more for your money than self-publishing.  

  • There’s Less For You to Manage

Publishers exist because, like it or not, publishing is a full-time job. You may check your social media every day, but there’s more to it when you have to hold marketing campaigns, interact with followers, create newsletters, make guest-posts and content for your blog, and tailor your website to actually catch the attention of your audience.

A small press can handle this for you, putting people on the job with the experience and education to not only take this burden off your shoulders, but do it better and more regularly than you.

  • You Have More Control

As already stated, traditional publishers call all the shots. Do you like your current title? Too bad, it’s being changed. Hate that color scheme of this cover? Sorry, it’s what the genre likes. Think this section of your story is valuable? It can still be cut.

Small presses are more flexible when it comes to the decision-making process, giving you more freedom to keep titles, revise chapters, and put your foot down about keeping a certain character. Mathews’ book is a late coming-of-age novel about spirituality, hard choices, and lost loves, and she received some resistance on the spiritual element. However, with a small press, she was able to keep what she sees as one of the most valuable parts of the book. Even if they drive a hard bargain, smaller publishing companies will at least put more serious consideration into your suggestions.

  • Royalties Are More Evenly Divided

On average, a traditional publishing company will offer 5-15% royalties to authors, but some small presses will offer up to 50%.

The author of Transforming Pandora made a deal with her small press to “contribute towards the cost of production and [not] get any royalties for Transforming Pandora until 1,000 copies [were] sold.” However, “The contracts for the next two books, Squaring Circles and Pandora’s Gift are better. I get royalties from the start.”

You can negotiate with your small publishing company to make a deal that best works for you, with a lot more promising results than you’d find from the traditional route.


  • You Won’t Control Your Prices

Unfortunately, a publishing company is still a publishing company, and they only succeed if they’re able to make back the money they’ve invested in your work. This means most small presses don’t give authors control over the price their book is sold as.

Carolyn Mathews said, “I don’t have any control over the price of the paperbacks and ebooks, and can’t do any cut-price promotions – that’s all in the hands of the publishers.”

Mathews’ publisher has put her book on sale on Amazon for 99 cents until July 15th, but other ideas have had the breaks put on them. This is a gamble, since maybe you’re in the right – and maybe they are.

  • You Still Need Permissions

You wake up one morning with a brilliant idea of holding an author interview with your favorite podcast. It’ll drive sales; it’ll get your name out there! Hold the phone; don’t make contact with the podcast hosts yet. You still need to ask your small press for permission on things concerning your book, even after it’s been published. Running out there on your own will muddle their efforts and yours, and even if it’s a great idea, you still need to check in with the team before going forward.

  • You’ll Have Disagreements on What is “Necessary”

That podcast idea? Your small press might turn you down.

Like any cooperation, there’s going to be disagreements. While you’ll have more control over some elements of your book, your publisher may decide that a second round of proofreading isn’t what your book really needs. You need to be prepared to make compromises and accept some losses. Trust me, no author has ever been 100% happy with every element of the publishing process.

So Steam is having a “Free Weekend Weekend” event where 10 games are available for free, and their retail prices are also discounted. Instead of making 10 individual posts, I’m making one MEGA post. I’m only noting the prices of the games that are on sale for under $5, but all the games listed here are available for FREE until Sunday at 1pm PST.

  1. Payday 2
  2. Company of Heroes 2
  3. Awesomenauts (on sale for $2.49)
  4. Don’t Starve
  5. Trine 2: Complete Story (on sale for $3.99)
  6. Grid 2
  7. Killing Floor (on sale for $4.99)
  8. Blade Symphony (on sale for $3.74)
  9. XCOM: Enemy Unknown
  10. Injustice Gods Among Us: Ultimate Ed

I can personally recommend Trine 2. It’s one of my favorite indie games, and, gah, just watch the trailer.

Spread the word and enjoy some free games this weekend!

Game Map Sneak Peak

Our Map has about multiple layers including a grid sectioning out all the areas. This is one of the layers showing the different environments planned out. As mentioned early you can choose which region you would like to live in. We have the snowy mountains to the North, Central Region with plains, and the south with tropical forests. We are going to be piecing together the areas in the next few weeks, which will give us the ground work to start world building again. 

Something interesting HE has, is seamless linking. Which means you could cross the entire map with no load screens. The only load screens (planned currently) may be special areas such as farm instances and maps separate from the game world but it’s quite exciting since I know most of us don’t particular care for long loading screens which interrupt game-play. 

That being said, Do you have a region which interests you the most?

Pumpkin-Online is a Harvest-Moon / Animal Crossing inspired mmo currently in development by indie game company, Pumpkin Interactive, we need a lot of support to make this happen so please follow, and spread the word about us. Please visit out website or  Forums and join the discussion!?