indian-land

Goldfinch 2017 03 – Zen Glen, Indian Land, South Carolina, February 27, 2017

What the Republicans, CEOs, and Business Czars
don’t understand
with their Profit At Any Price fixation,
is that when the Standard of Living
(Read: Stock Market)
goes UP,
the Quality of Life
(Read: Health and Peace of Mind)
goes DOWN.

It’s a rule.
It ought to have a name.
If it doesn’t, we could call it
Dollar’s Law.
After a certain point in level of income,
Wealth and Happiness vary
in inverse proportion to each other.
That point is not fixed,
and depends upon a number of factors–
“intangibles,” such as pain threshold
and personal values.
More money is not the solution
to all of our problems today or any day.
If money would do it,
goes the old saying,
you don’t have problems,
you have expenses.

A shift in orientation and attitude
is that solution.
“Anything can happen if you let it,”
is Mary Poppins wisdom,
but it means,
“You can be as peaceful and content
(happy) as you allow yourself to be.”

These are slowly popping up in the gentrified neighborhoods of Portland, Oregon. Once the stomping grounds of the Upper Chinook, Multnomah, and other tribes…

For more information, contact: burymyart@gmail.com

R.I.S.E.
Radical
Indigenous
Survivance &
Empowerment

http://facebook.com/RISEindigenous
_______________________________.

8

It’s a Cherokee rose. The story is that when American soldiers were moving Indians off their land on the trail of tears the Cherokee mothers were grieving and crying so much ‘cause they were losing their little ones along the way from exposure and disease and starvation. A lot of them just disappeared. So the elders, they, uh, said a prayer. Asked for a sign to uplift the mothers’ spirits, give them strength and hope. The next day, this rose started to grow right where the mothers’ tears fell. I’m not fool enough to think there’s any flowers blooming for my brother. But I believe this one bloomed for your little girl.

the walking dead » season two; episode four » cherokee rose

Super Moonshine 2016 01 – Indian Land, South Carolina, November 13, 2016

Do your work.

Tend your business.

It will carry you into perceiving the all-ness of the situation

as it unfolds before you,

and responding to it with your particular gifts and proclivities

in protesting what must be protested,

affirming what cries out to be affirmed,

and standing with those who are vulnerable, marginalized,

at risk and without enough advocates and friends.

Doing our work means working to enable all people

to do their work

free of fear, oppression, humiliation, violence and intolerance–

“one nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”