indian houses

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Indian-Americans raise $100,000 for Ian Grillot, the man who intervened in racist Kansas bar shooting

  • Ian Grillot, 24, accepted a $100,000 check from India House Houston on Saturday as a reward for intervening in a February attack on two Indian engineers in Kansas.
  • “It is not every day that one meets a genuine hero — a person who risks his life for another and takes a bullet for a complete stranger,” the Texas-based community group said in a Facebook post on Monday. “Ian Grillot is a man who reminds us of the promise of America and its greatness.”
  • According to court documents, 51-year-old Adam Purinton allegedly shot Srinivas Kuchibhotla and Alok Madasani on Feb. 22 at a bar in Olathe, Kansas — just outside Kansas City — after reportedly asking for their immigration status and yelling at them to “get out of my country." 
  • Kuchibhotla died from the shooting, and Madasani was sent to the hospital in critical condition. 
  • Grillot, who is white, took a bullet to the hand and chest while rushing at Purinton to stop him shortly after he opened fire.
  • Grillot’s $100,000 gift from India House Houston will supplement the more than $473,000 that was raised for him through a GoFundMe campaign. Read more (3/27/17 11 AM)
‘Strange Vibes’ Playlist

“So Many Details” - Toro Y Moi
“Past Life” - Tame Impala
“Tessellate” - alt-J
“Video Girl” - FKA Twigs
“The Wilhelm Scream” - James Blake
“All My Friends” - LCD Soundsystem
“Annie” - Neon Indian
“Spirit” - Future Islands
“Knife” - Grizzly Bear
“Feel It All Around” - Washed Out
“On the Sea” - Beach House
“Plastic” - Moses Sumney
“17″ - Youth Lagoon
“Words I Don’t Remember” - How To Dress Well
“Black Mambo” - Glass Animals
“Gold” - Chet Faker
“Out Getting Ribs (King Krule Cover)” - Local Natives

Second year Mafalda Prewett and fourth year Poonima Shah of Slytherin House c.1994 

“Your last name is Prewett?”

“Yes! Two e’s and two t’s, what is your name?”

“Shah - my name is Poonima Shah-Fenwick.”

“Fenwick?”

“My father was Benjy Fenwick.”

There’s a rebellion brewing down in the dungeons 

Thank you so much for the awesome commission @sadfishkid !!!

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Favorite wardrobe moments from Depressing News -

  1.  Margaret’s ducky underpants
  2.  BJ’s Chucks + Hawk’s suspiciously 80′s tennies
  3. - 5. Klinger’s many hats + Potter’s painting outfit
Caffeine #11

I enjoyed this, and tried to mess up the prompt as badly as I could. It’s very sketchily done and un-edited. I did it in my spare time in the middle of my school day; do forgive me.

Her first job was at a small Italian restaurant on the corner.

Her boss was nice. That was the best thing about that job; when she started feeling frustrated, mistreated, her boss would plonk her down on a wobbly three-legged stool in the back room and pile an untouched leftover dish onto a spare plate in front of her.

Keep reading

UK English vs. American English

A shortlist of terms that do not translate the same from one dialect to another. Other countries in the Commonwealth use different words also, but I’m not trying to be thorough. This list might also seem random because I watch/listen to a lot of British material and pick up random lexicon. If I made a clear mistake let me know and I’ll correct it.

UK English = U.S. English

lift = elevator

flat = apartment

rubbish bin = trash can* 

telly = TV

grey = gray

mate = buddy

biscuit = cookie

crisps = chips (tortilla, potato, etc.)

chips = fries**

hoover = vacuum cleaner

car bonnet = car hood

car boot = car trunk

number plate = license plate

football = soccer

tube = subway

(at the) cinema = (at the) movies

programme = TV show

curry house = Indian restaurant

mum/mummy = mom/mommy  

car park = parking lot

zebra crossing = crosswalk

mobile = cell phone

jimjams = pj’s (”pajamas” is an Indian word)

the Council = the County (when referring to local legislature)

E-numbers = artificial food additives, preservatives, and dyes

wellys = rain boots 

to nick = to steal

Detailed comparisons:

*An English “pedal bin” is a trash can with a foot pedal that pops the lid. American’s have those too, but we don’t specify the pedal. An American can you roll to the curb to be emptied is generally called a “garbage” can, but one indoors is called a “trash” can and if it’s small or woven it is a “waste basket.” Likewise there are a variety of other terms for “bins” in England, but I can’t remember them.

**The most confusing differences are often when it comes to food. For instance, English “chips” are usually wedge cut, fried potatoes that an American would not instantly consider a “French fry.” The equivalent to English chips in the US are called “potato wedges” or sometimes “potato fingers,” which as an American I find weird. English chips seem to rarely come in thin “fry” form and are most commonly in thick pieces. Meanwhile, Americans chow down on crinklecut fries, shoestring fries, waffle fries, chili fries, zucchini fries, and anything else they can get into the deep fat fryer.

An English “pudding” is not the flavored dairy custard Americans make with a mix, but is more like dense cake or sometimes bread with filling (which is specifically called “Yorkshire” pudding). American “pie” does not commonly contain meat or gravy (though we do eat chicken “pot” pie because it’s like a pot of stew in a crust), but pie is usually served as a dessert. Some American cities like New York and Chicago call pizza “pie” too. English milk chocolate candy (and I hear differing accounts on this) is much sweeter than American milk chocolate. Based on how I can only handle so much Cadbury chocolate in one sitting, I tend to agree. 

This is sort of food-related, but an English “pub” and an American “bar” are two very different kinds of establishments, so I hear. The following comparison is not true of all bars and pubs, but…You go to a pub to have a meal and a drink with your mates. You go to a bar to get drunk, laid, and possibly tattooed. These are the stereotypical (though not necessarily accurate) differences between English and American liquor establishments. You can still get plastered and make bad choices at a pub, and you can still have a quiet drink and a burger in a bar. Just don’t walk into a bar or pub for the first time and expect certain things (this paragraph brought to you by our mild-mannered English friend who thought it would be safe to wander into a bar in New York City before hastily wandering out again).

That’s all the comparisons I can think of off the top of my head. Please, if you’re from the UK or are just an American anglophile who watches lots of BBC, add whatever I’ve missed to the list! 

bluepill: the russians put trump in the white house
“redpill”: all unironic iterations of the multidimensional game meme
redpill: trump was put in the white house by indian call center hackers in a risky but calculated move to ensure that india becomes a superpower by 2020