indian brocade

2

Costume worn by Queen Victoria to a ball inspired by ‘The Court of King Charles II’ on the 31st July 1851, with Victoria records in her diary -

‘… My costume was of grey moiré antique, ornamented with gold lace, - a very long waist & sleeves trimmed with old lace. The petticoat showing under the dress which was all open in front, was of rich gold and silver brocade (Indian manufacture) richly trimmed with silver lace… In my hair I wore an arrangement of pearls. The shoes and gloves were embroidered to match the dress.’

1851 drawing of Victoria in her costume, with Albert in his costume made for the ball. I love this drawing because it really gives you an idea of how short Victoria was!

lamperouge-1  asked:

Hi, sorry if this is a dumb question, but what is the difference between Indian wedding clothes and regular clothes?

Hi, Indian clothing such as sari, salwar kameez and lehenga choli are worn both regularly and for weddings or festive occasions. The difference is mainly in the fabrics, patterns and embroidery used. Wedding attires are made using heavy silks, brocades, jacquards and velvets. The embroidery is rich and elaborate using gold, silver and metal threads, semi-precious and precious stones. The recent Sabyasachi campaigns are good examples.

Regular clothing is generally made of cotton, cotton silk, muslin, khadi, chiffon and linen. Block prints and chikankari (white thread embroidery) are quite common in casual Indian clothing. Brocade, gold/silver embroidery might also be used, but in a more subtle manner.

The following images might give you some idea.

Hand-block Printed and Chikankari Embroidered Cotton Kurtas 

PC: Fabindia

Kalamkari and Hand-block Printed Cotton Saris

PC: Ajio

Hand Embroidered and Hand-block Printed Cotton/ Cotton Silk Lehengas 

PC: Mogra Designs

2

The Queen and Prince Albert wearing costumes of the Charles II period, are dressed for the “Stuart Ball” which was held in the throne room of Buckingham Palace the 13th of June, 1851. (The throne room was used as the palace’s ballroom until the addition of the new ballroom which was completed five years later.) The French artist Eugène Lami designed the Queen’s gown, which she later described in her famous journal:

“… My costume was of grey moiré antique, ornamented with gold lace, - a very long waist & sleeves trimmed with old lace. The petticoat showing under the dress which was all open in front, was of rich gold and silver brocade (Indian manufacture) richly trimmed with silver lace… In my hair I wore an arrangement of pearls. The shoes and gloves were embroidered to match the dress.”