independent clothes

hey let’s stop reblogging and praising the independence day clothing line ie the clothing line designed for autistic children. after hearing a disturbing rumor about ID clothing i looked up some more about them and it’s true.

independence day clothing is designed with hidden gps trackers to enable parents to “keep tabs” on their autistic children

just look up “independence day clothing trackers” and you’ll find lots more sources about it. in case it isn’t obvious, the idea of parents tagging their kids against their will and often without their knowledge in order to track their every mood is disgusting and abusive and especially so with autistic kids and teens who are already more vulnerable to abuse.

multiple articles praise these gps enabled articles of clothing for having such discreet trackers for the specific purpose of keeping the wearer from pulling them out. this alone should be a huge red flag. the creator, an allistic parent of an autistic child, has made multiple statements on the tracker and all are absolutely disturbing.

as an autistic person and a sufferer of ableist parental abuse and manipulation, please please please do not support independence day clothing

Star Butterfly and Marco Diaz in Fourth of July

Since Marco and Star wear new red, white, and blue outfits, they say, “HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY!!!”. In addition, He shouts, “U.S.A., U.S.A., U.S.A.!!” and “I love Fourth of July fireworks!!”. Star replies, “Yeah, I want to see that’s pretty dazzling, me too!”

anyway thats your daily reminder that allistics aint shit, and more importantly:

if you have any clothes from independence day clothing co and have an abusive relationship in your life (parents or otherwise), please be careful. 

all of their clothes are designed with a hidden pocket that buyers have the option to place a very small and discrete gps tracker inside.

How to Start Your Own Clothing Company

A clothing company can be a huge income source if you’ve got the right creative eye. It can take a lot of money to start a clothing store though, doesn’t it? Not just anyone can make one…

Wrong.

If you’re seriously looking to create a brand of clothing, there are some things that I had to learn the hard way that could benefit someone just starting out. Here they are.

1. Do your research on the feel of clothing you want to create. Brands like American Eagle and Vans have a target audience that they know and cater to. Figure out who your audience is and what they’re already wearing. Design like that. Designing clothes you yourself would wear is a really good place to start.

2. Use GIMP to start out with if you can’t afford good software for design. Start each image out with the appropriate dimensions for the graphic. This will cause some research on your end, make sure you write it down on a post it on your computer. Typically they’re about 12″x12″ and at least 150ppi… These things can be set right when you start a new document. Save as .pngs and you’ve just created a t-shirt graphic!

3. Sign up for Shopify.com (This will cost $30 a month but they don’t take your first-born if you start making bank, just $30. Other companies take a percentage.

4. Match the theme and look of your website to your brands feel. This will create a great legit company looking website.

5. In the app section, download the Printful app. This is a company in CA that prints your shirt out and ships it to your customer. This takes out you having to front $200 to get 30 shirts from Vistaprint, etc… No inventory… No risk for bad designs (other than bad designs)… You sell the shirt for $21, they charge you $11 and you keep $10. You can even change those prices as high or low as you want. I would suggest getting a sample sent to you, so you can see your graphics in person.

6. When an order comes in, the print place handles the print and ship part… They’ve never missed a shirt or order in the year we’ve used them for thisiswhattranslookslike.com – Though you do need to pay attention, if an address is incorrect they’ll email you.


7. Use the profits from this adventure to purchase shirts from discountmugs.com, they’re the cheapest place I could find online and they’re good quality. The profit margin is considerably higher if you sell a shirt for $21 that you only paid $3 for instead of Printful’s $11… You’ll have to do the shipping yourself, but it’ll help increase your profit to expand however you see fit.

You can also just maintain the one website without bringing in inventory.
They do shirts and tanks and hoodies.

Good Luck!
I hope when you’re up and running, you consider advertising in the magazine!

so many headcanons for all ma ladies that i need to start writing down

independent.co.uk
Philippines has banned companies from forcing women to wear heels
The Philippines has banned companies from forcing women to wear high heels – a move that’s been hailed as a landmark victory against sexism by labour unions. The new government order, which came into effect on Sunday, dictates that employers should implement the use of "practical and comfortable footwear" and that workers must not wear heels that are higher than an inch, unless they choose to do so.
independent.co.uk
John Lewis has got rid of 'girls' and 'boys' labels in children's clothing
John Lewis has become the first UK retailer to remove gender labels from its children’s clothing.

Independent writes:

The department store chain has not only taken “girls” and “boys” labels from clothes, but has also done away with the separate sections in stores. John Lewis own-brand children clothing will now simply say “Girls & Boys” or “Boys & Girls.” […]

The clothing style hasn’t changed – you’ll still find floral dresses and skirts, but the retailer is simply proving the point that they can be worn by both girls and boys.

They’ve also launched a new unisex clothing line for children, featuring dinosaur print dresses and spaceship tops.

Caroline Bettis, the head of childrenswear at John Lewis, said: “We do not want to reinforce gender stereotypes within our John Lewis collections and instead want to provide greater choice and variety to our customers, so that the parent or child can choose what they would like to wear.”

Read the whole story!