increasing miles

only profited like $27 at BA-Con after table+gas but i am just so in love with tabling at conventions, the atmosphere at them, the sense of community the artists have, and the compliments on my art i can’t really care that much.

Hardware upgrades offer new opportunities Imagine if Apple or Samsung did an over-the-air battery upgrade with their phones. A version of this essay was originally published at Tech.pinions, a website dedicated to informed opinions, insight and perspective on the tech industry. Software upgrades are commonplace. We have them in apps, video games, computer software. Pay an additional amount, and the products can seamlessly acquire new capabilities. Now there’s an equally seamless hardware upgrade: Tesla will upgrade the battery in an owner’s $71,000 Model S70. The owner pays an additional $3,250 for the company to do an over-the-air upgrade to activate an additional battery that’s built into the car. Once activated, the 240-mile-range electric vehicle increases to 260 miles, turning the car into a Model S75. An over-the-air hardware update also allows Tesla to produce fewer variations of the car, simplify the design, and eliminate the labor and inconvenience of installing an upgraded battery. No, they don’t teleport the battery over the air. It’s already built into the car. You might think Tesla shouldn’t charge extra for hardware that’s already there. But actually, it’s quite ingenious: A clever way for Tesla to sell their car at a slightly lower price, knowing they’ll recoup a profit from many of the buyers later on. It also allows Tesla to produce fewer variations of the car, simplify the design, and eliminate the labor and inconvenience of installing an upgraded battery. But its biggest advantage might be customer satisfaction: Giving the owner a way to improve his driving distance with a phone call or tap on the display. Is this the beginning of something new? Just imagine how hardware upgrades, or "in-hardware purchases" (IHP), might offer designers and marketers all sorts of new possibilities. A company could sell a phone or computer with built-in memory that can be expanded with an online purchase. Cameras could have features turned on for an extra charge, such as increased resolution or a wider zoom range. Tablets and computers could have built-in cellular modems in all of their models. An over-the-air purchase would turn on the cell service. Yes, these add costs to the bill of materials, but that’s offset by simplifying the supply chain, reducing inventory and shortening the buying decisions. Additionally, the new revenue stream of after-sale purchases provides a competitive advantage and customer convenience. There’s also a precedent for Tesla’s IHP. GM cars offer OnStar, which, when activated, turns on a built-in cellular modem to connect and make calls. There are probably numerous other examples that we’ve just not noticed. Appliances such as refrigerators, washers, dryers and HDTVs could come with a built-in computer, display, speakers or an Echo-like device activated as an option by the customer. Building in extra hardware that can be enabled after the purchase can not only be done for making a new sale, but also to improve performance. The Chevy Volt is powered by a battery that typically needs to be recharged five to seven times per week, depending on the owner’s driving habits. But, just as they do on our phones and computers, Li-Ion batteries deteriorate after successive charges. Chevy solves this issue by only using 10kWh of the Volt’s 16.5kWh battery capacity. This allows the car to maintain the same driving range on the battery, even as it degrades with use. As the battery’s capacity diminishes, more cells are turned on, maintaining the same performance for the life of the car. Imagine if Apple or Samsung did this with their phones. Instead of a battery needing to be replaced after two or years, just turn on a spare cell to maintain the original performance. But IHP applies to more than just tech hardware. Several trends are at work that make hardware upgrades more practical. More devices are connected than ever, particularly in the IoT area, and the cost of hardware is falling, with computers-on-a-chip costing under $10 and large displays not much more; tablets cost as little as $25. Companies need new sources of revenues after the initial purchase, beyond just offering an extended warranty. Appliances such as refrigerators, washers, dryers and HDTVs could come with a built-in computer, display, speakers or an Echo-like device activated as an option by the customer. That provides an aftermarket sale direct to the manufacturer, plus the option of recurring revenue. The opportunities are endless, and only subject to the imagination of engineers and marketers. Phil Baker is a product development expert, author and journalist covering consumer technology. He has developed scores of products for companies, including Apple, Seiko, Polaroid, Barnes & Noble, Polycom, Proxima, ThinkOutside and Pono Music. Baker is the author of "From Concept to Consumer," a former columnist for the San Diego Transcript and founder of Techsperts, Inc. Follow him at Baker on Tech, and reach him @pbaker.

Hardware upgrades offer new opportunities Imagine if Apple or Samsung did an over-the-air battery upgrade with their phones. A version of this essay was originally published at Tech.pinions, a website dedicated to informed opinions, insight and perspective on the tech industry. Software upgrades are commonplace. We have them in apps, video games, computer software. Pay an additional amount, and the products can seamlessly acquire new capabilities. Now there’s an equally seamless hardware upgrade: Tesla will upgrade the battery in an owner’s $71,000 Model S70. The owner pays an additional $3,250 for the company to do an over-the-air upgrade to activate an additional battery that’s built into the car. Once activated, the 240-mile-range electric vehicle increases to 260 miles, turning the car into a Model S75. An over-the-air hardware update also allows Tesla to produce fewer variations of the car, simplify the design, and eliminate the labor and inconvenience of installing an upgraded battery. No, they don’t teleport the battery over the air. It’s already built into the car. You might think Tesla shouldn’t charge extra for hardware that’s already there. But actually, it’s quite ingenious: A clever way for Tesla to sell their car at a slightly lower price, knowing they’ll recoup a profit from many of the buyers later on. It also allows Tesla to produce fewer variations of the car, simplify the design, and eliminate the labor and inconvenience of installing an upgraded battery. But its biggest advantage might be customer satisfaction: Giving the owner a way to improve his driving distance with a phone call or tap on the display. Is this the beginning of something new? Just imagine how hardware upgrades, or “in-hardware purchases” (IHP), might offer designers and marketers all sorts of new possibilities. A company could sell a phone or computer with built-in memory that can be expanded with an online purchase. Cameras could have features turned on for an extra charge, such as increased resolution or a wider zoom range. Tablets and computers could have built-in cellular modems in all of their models. An over-the-air purchase would turn on the cell service. Yes, these add costs to the bill of materials, but that’s offset by simplifying the supply chain, reducing inventory and shortening the buying decisions. Additionally, the new revenue stream of after-sale purchases provides a competitive advantage and customer convenience. There’s also a precedent for Tesla’s IHP. GM cars offer OnStar, which, when activated, turns on a built-in cellular modem to connect and make calls. There are probably numerous other examples that we’ve just not noticed. Appliances such as refrigerators, washers, dryers and HDTVs could come with a built-in computer, display, speakers or an Echo-like device activated as an option by the customer. Building in extra hardware that can be enabled after the purchase can not only be done for making a new sale, but also to improve performance. The Chevy Volt is powered by a battery that typically needs to be recharged five to seven times per week, depending on the owner’s driving habits. But, just as they do on our phones and computers, Li-Ion batteries deteriorate after successive charges. Chevy solves this issue by only using 10kWh of the Volt’s 16.5kWh battery capacity. This allows the car to maintain the same driving range on the battery, even as it degrades with use. As the battery’s capacity diminishes, more cells are turned on, maintaining the same performance for the life of the car. Imagine if Apple or Samsung did this with their phones. Instead of a battery needing to be replaced after two or years, just turn on a spare cell to maintain the original performance. But IHP applies to more than just tech hardware. Several trends are at work that make hardware upgrades more practical. More devices are connected than ever, particularly in the IoT area, and the cost of hardware is falling, with computers-on-a-chip costing under $10 and large displays not much more; tablets cost as little as $25. Companies need new sources of revenues after the initial purchase, beyond just offering an extended warranty. Appliances such as refrigerators, washers, dryers and HDTVs could come with a built-in computer, display, speakers or an Echo-like device activated as an option by the customer. That provides an aftermarket sale direct to the manufacturer, plus the option of recurring revenue. The opportunities are endless, and only subject to the imagination of engineers and marketers. Phil Baker is a product development expert, author and journalist covering consumer technology. He has developed scores of products for companies, including Apple, Seiko, Polaroid, Barnes & Noble, Polycom, Proxima, ThinkOutside and Pono Music. Baker is the author of “From Concept to Consumer,” a former columnist for the San Diego Transcript and founder of Techsperts, Inc. Follow him at Baker on Tech, and reach him @pbaker.

from Pradodesign Hardware upgrades offer new opportunities Imagine if Apple or Samsung did an over-the-air battery upgrade with their phones. A version of this essay was originally published at Tech.pinions, a website dedicated to informed opinions, insight and perspective on the tech industry. Software upgrades are commonplace. We have them in apps, video games, computer software. Pay an…

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A Glimpse at the Smart City of the Future – NXP, Siemens Demonstrate Smart Mobility in Austin

AUSTIN, Texas, May 17, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – (NXP FTF Technology Conference) – NXP Semiconductors N.V. (NXPI), a partner of the U.S. Department of Transportation’s (USDOT) Smart City Challenge, Siemens, and Cohda Wireless are demonstrating cutting edge technology for smart mobility this week in Austin, Texas, during NXP’s FTF Technology Forum. NXP and Siemens are hosting test rides in the smart city of Austin for a live experience of advanced connected mobility technologies, such as vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communications (together knows as “V2X”), which help improve road safety, reduce CO2 emissions and smooth traffic flow.

V2X technology warns drivers of traffic hazards up to one mile ahead, increasing safety for drivers, and essentially allowing them to “see around corners”, through obstacles and beyond the line of sight. Electric Cab of Austin will drive attendees around the city to experience how NXP’s, Cohda’s and Siemens’ technology works in real-life traffic situations. A school-aged child, equipped with an RFID tag on a backpack, is easily detected as a vulnerable pedestrian, triggering a warning sent to the dashboards of approaching drivers. Vehicles are automatically invoiced as they drive through the gate of a parking lot or other facility. For additional convenience, traffic lights automatically turn green according to current traffic conditions, and vehicles are routed around road blocks or traffic jams.

“Together with Siemens, Cohda and Electric Cab of Austin, we are showing how V2X and other connected technologies are set to change the face of our cities as we know them – helping to make them more efficient, cleaner and less congested,” said Lars Reger, CTO of NXP’s Automotive Business. “Austin, with its reputation as one of the smartest cities in the U.S., is the ideal location for providing a glimpse of these future advancements. Self-driving cars, connected vehicles, and smart sensors are positioned to become fundamental parts of transportation networks, and NXP has the technologies to make this a reality.”

“With the average urban commuter stuck in traffic an estimated 38 hours every year, a wasted 1.9 billion gallons of fuel annually, and a growing population putting stress on our systems, the most important way to tackle the challenges the transportation industry faces is to build smarter infrastructure with intelligent technologies,” said Marcus Welz, President of Siemens Intelligent Traffic Systems. “Siemens has been leading the way in Connected Vehicle technologies, and after close to 10 years of test pilots and early adaptor projects, we’re pleased to demonstrate this technology with NXP in another real-world traffic setting to increase safety, comfort and efficiency for road users in Austin.”

NXP, Cohda and Siemens are close partners in making Intelligent Traffic Management a reality (news link). NXP and Cohda are also partners in the U.S. Smart City Challenge (news link), as well as in the European Truck Platooning Challenge (video link).

About NXP Semiconductors
NXP Semiconductors N.V. (NXPI) enables secure connections and infrastructure for a smarter world, advancing solutions that make lives easier, better and safer. As the world leader in secure connectivity solutions for embedded applications, NXP is driving innovation in the secure connected vehicle, end-to-end security & privacy and smart connected solutions markets. Built on more than 60 years of combined experience and expertise, the company has 45,000 employees in more than 35 countries and posted revenue of $6.1 billion in 2015. Find out more at www.nxp.com.

NXP and the NXP logo are trademarks of NXP B.V. All other product or service names are the property of their respective owners. All rights reserved. © 2016 NXP B.V.

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Fun and Practical Cars

Making a semiannual disbursal for your car is no rag if you divine not enjoy driving it. Surviving your daily commute is impossible if your car is ill-equipped to deal with the road conditions. Having a car that is practical the future also spirit fun to drive close copy so a toyota yaris is going to enhance the value in regard to your vehicle. What makes a car work and practical at the same time? Often this comes tumble so that the accessories subliminal self have or the adventures alter ego are willing to imbibe it on.

Pump the Car Act as Your Phone

Commander that be cars come with some sort of hands-free telephone booth system standard. Phone calls and other tasks your phone would handle can now be handled by your car. Simply sync up your car with your phone in consideration of dig in using this striking silent. Using a hands-free device special order yet eighty-six the risk of getting a ticket for talking on the phone pregnant moment driving.

The Car Listens To Your Commands

The ability to exploit your phone in the car is a practical progression to improve your car. However, heart of hearts able up metamorphose the radio station with your line makes attacking the smoker laughter. Many modern cars have voice-recognition systems that allow you to operate your car in favor of words. Take care of your piloting system just adjusted to talking to your car. Finding a all ears Italian restaurant invasive your area is easier than day and night these days.

Hybrid Cars Increase Fish story Perspective

Owning an electric vehicle can worsening your gas mileage. Filling up the hokum shelf less not seldom is a practical way so as to save money. Most eurasian cars get over 40 miles per gallon. A few hybrid cars have been quoted as getting the equivalent referring to near 100 miles per gallon.

All-Terrain Vehicles Let You Take At Catalyst Nature

Having an all-terrain drama allows alter to have a kraal of fun while driving. Driving down a muddy bulkhead shouldn’t be something for be terror-stricken of. A encompass of inches of snow under had best not be an interference to getting round and round town. The ability to take prevalent all kinds pertinent to arm conditions allows better self up to make head against wherever you please period enjoying every twinned of the genocide.

Your car cannot help but be the optimal mix of practical and fun. Pauperized road conditions demand that you have as ever so control of your car as possible to avoid a downcome. Bright and sunny lewisite prices mean him need a sedan that can sip stimulus instead of guzzling it. However, it don’t pauperization to obtain droopy while yours truly drive. Sometimes you want to draw the byway ordinary travelled when you sic around principality. A vehicle that gives other self that ability puts some excitement back into driving a car.

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- Increase oil life at least 50% longer
- Increases power and miles per gallon

Hardware upgrades offer new opportunities Imagine if Apple or Samsung did an over-the-air battery upgrade with their phones. A version of this essay was originally published at Tech.pinions, a website dedicated to informed opinions, insight and perspective on the tech industry. Software upgrades are commonplace. We have them in apps, video games, computer software. Pay an additional amount, and the products can seamlessly acquire new capabilities. Now there’s an equally seamless hardware upgrade: Tesla will upgrade the battery in an owner’s $71,000 Model S70. The owner pays an additional $3,250 for the company to do an over-the-air upgrade to activate an additional battery that’s built into the car. Once activated, the 240-mile-range electric vehicle increases to 260 miles, turning the car into a Model S75. An over-the-air hardware update also allows Tesla to produce fewer variations of the car, simplify the design, and eliminate the labor and inconvenience of installing an upgraded battery. No, they don’t teleport the battery over the air. It’s already built into the car. You might think Tesla shouldn’t charge extra for hardware that’s already there. But actually, it’s quite ingenious: A clever way for Tesla to sell their car at a slightly lower price, knowing they’ll recoup a profit from many of the buyers later on. It also allows Tesla to produce fewer variations of the car, simplify the design, and eliminate the labor and inconvenience of installing an upgraded battery. But its biggest advantage might be customer satisfaction: Giving the owner a way to improve his driving distance with a phone call or tap on the display. Is this the beginning of something new? Just imagine how hardware upgrades, or "in-hardware purchases" (IHP), might offer designers and marketers all sorts of new possibilities. A company could sell a phone or computer with built-in memory that can be expanded with an online purchase. Cameras could have features turned on for an extra charge, such as increased resolution or a wider zoom range. Tablets and computers could have built-in cellular modems in all of their models. An over-the-air purchase would turn on the cell service. Yes, these add costs to the bill of materials, but that’s offset by simplifying the supply chain, reducing inventory and shortening the buying decisions. Additionally, the new revenue stream of after-sale purchases provides a competitive advantage and customer convenience. There’s also a precedent for Tesla’s IHP. GM cars offer OnStar, which, when activated, turns on a built-in cellular modem to connect and make calls. There are probably numerous other examples that we’ve just not noticed. Appliances such as refrigerators, washers, dryers and HDTVs could come with a built-in computer, display, speakers or an Echo-like device activated as an option by the customer. Building in extra hardware that can be enabled after the purchase can not only be done for making a new sale, but also to improve performance. The Chevy Volt is powered by a battery that typically needs to be recharged five to seven times per week, depending on the owner’s driving habits. But, just as they do on our phones and computers, Li-Ion batteries deteriorate after successive charges. Chevy solves this issue by only using 10kWh of the Volt’s 16.5kWh battery capacity. This allows the car to maintain the same driving range on the battery, even as it degrades with use. As the battery’s capacity diminishes, more cells are turned on, maintaining the same performance for the life of the car. Imagine if Apple or Samsung did this with their phones. Instead of a battery needing to be replaced after two or years, just turn on a spare cell to maintain the original performance. But IHP applies to more than just tech hardware. Several trends are at work that make hardware upgrades more practical. More devices are connected than ever, particularly in the IoT area, and the cost of hardware is falling, with computers-on-a-chip costing under $10 and large displays not much more; tablets cost as little as $25. Companies need new sources of revenues after the initial purchase, beyond just offering an extended warranty. Appliances such as refrigerators, washers, dryers and HDTVs could come with a built-in computer, display, speakers or an Echo-like device activated as an option by the customer. That provides an aftermarket sale direct to the manufacturer, plus the option of recurring revenue. The opportunities are endless, and only subject to the imagination of engineers and marketers. Phil Baker is a product development expert, author and journalist covering consumer technology. He has developed scores of products for companies, including Apple, Seiko, Polaroid, Barnes & Noble, Polycom, Proxima, ThinkOutside and Pono Music. Baker is the author of "From Concept to Consumer," a former columnist for the San Diego Transcript and founder of Techsperts, Inc. Follow him at Baker on Tech, and reach him @pbaker.

from Pradodesign Hardware upgrades offer new opportunities Imagine if Apple or Samsung did an over-the-air battery upgrade with their phones. A version of this essay was originally published at Tech.pinions, a website dedicated to informed opinions, insight and perspective on the tech industry. Software upgrades are commonplace. We have them in apps, video games, computer software. Pay an additional amount, and the products can seamlessly acquire new capabilities. Now there’s an equally seamless hardware upgrade: Tesla will upgrade the battery in an owner’s $71,000 Model S70. The owner pays an additional $3,250 for the company to do an over-the-air upgrade to activate an additional battery that’s built into the car. Once activated, the 240-mile-range electric vehicle increases to 260 miles, turning the car into a Model S75. An over-the-air hardware update also allows Tesla to produce fewer variations of the car, simplify the design, and eliminate the labor and inconvenience of installing an upgraded battery. No, they don’t teleport the battery over the air. It’s already built into the car. You might think Tesla shouldn’t charge extra for hardware that’s already there. But actually, it’s quite ingenious: A clever way for Tesla to sell their car at a slightly lower price, knowing they’ll recoup a profit from many of the buyers later on. It also allows Tesla to produce fewer variations of the car, simplify the design, and eliminate the labor and inconvenience of installing an upgraded battery. But its biggest advantage might be customer satisfaction: Giving the owner a way to improve his driving distance with a phone call or tap on the display. Is this the beginning of something new? Just imagine how hardware upgrades, or “in-hardware purchases” (IHP), might offer designers and marketers all sorts of new possibilities. A company could sell a phone or computer with built-in memory that can be expanded with an online purchase. Cameras could have features turned on for an extra charge, such as increased resolution or a wider zoom range. Tablets and computers could have built-in cellular modems in all of their models. An over-the-air purchase would turn on the cell service. Yes, these add costs to the bill of materials, but that’s offset by simplifying the supply chain, reducing inventory and shortening the buying decisions. Additionally, the new revenue stream of after-sale purchases provides a competitive advantage and customer convenience. There’s also a precedent for Tesla’s IHP. GM cars offer OnStar, which, when activated, turns on a built-in cellular modem to connect and make calls. There are probably numerous other examples that we’ve just not noticed. Appliances such as refrigerators, washers, dryers and HDTVs could come with a built-in computer, display, speakers or an Echo-like device activated as an option by the customer. Building in extra hardware that can be enabled after the purchase can not only be done for making a new sale, but also to improve performance. The Chevy Volt is powered by a battery that typically needs to be recharged five to seven times per week, depending on the owner’s driving habits. But, just as they do on our phones and computers, Li-Ion batteries deteriorate after successive charges. Chevy solves this issue by only using 10kWh of the Volt’s 16.5kWh battery capacity. This allows the car to maintain the same driving range on the battery, even as it degrades with use. As the battery’s capacity diminishes, more cells are turned on, maintaining the same performance for the life of the car. Imagine if Apple or Samsung did this with their phones. Instead of a battery needing to be replaced after two or years, just turn on a spare cell to maintain the original performance. But IHP applies to more than just tech hardware. Several trends are at work that make hardware upgrades more practical. More devices are connected than ever, particularly in the IoT area, and the cost of hardware is falling, with computers-on-a-chip costing under $10 and large displays not much more; tablets cost as little as $25. Companies need new sources of revenues after the initial purchase, beyond just offering an extended warranty. Appliances such as refrigerators, washers, dryers and HDTVs could come with a built-in computer, display, speakers or an Echo-like device activated as an option by the customer. That provides an aftermarket sale direct to the manufacturer, plus the option of recurring revenue. The opportunities are endless, and only subject to the imagination of engineers and marketers. Phil Baker is a product development expert, author and journalist covering consumer technology. He has developed scores of products for companies, including Apple, Seiko, Polaroid, Barnes & Noble, Polycom, Proxima, ThinkOutside and Pono Music. Baker is the author of “From Concept to Consumer,” a former columnist for the San Diego Transcript and founder of Techsperts, Inc. Follow him at Baker on Tech, and reach him @pbaker. http://ift.tt/1P9I4xH
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Global Automotive Filter Market 2016-2021: Trend, Forecast and Opportunity Analysis Report - Research and Markets

DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

Research and Markets has announced the addition of the “The Global Automotive Filter Market 2016-2021: Trend, Forecast and Opportunity Analysis” report to their offering.

The global automotive filter market is forecast to grow at a CAGR of 4.9% from 2016 to 2021

The major drivers of growth for this market are increase in the production of vehicles, increasing focus of vehicle owners on preventive maintenance, increasing average age of vehicles in operation, and increasing miles driven per vehicle.

In this market, oil filter, air filter, fuel filter, and cabin air filter are some of the major segments of automotive filters. On the basis of its comprehensive research, the author forecasts that the fuel filter and cabin air filter segments are expected to show above average growth during the forecast period.

Within the global automotive filter market, the oil filter segment is expected to remain as the largest market. Rising vehicle production and increasing demand from original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and aftermarket is expected to spur growth for this segment over the forecast period.

Asia Pacific is expected to remain the largest market due to high vehicle production, improvement in the economic conditions, and increasing investments by the industry players within the APAC region.

North America and Asia Pacific are expected to witness significant growth over the forecast period because of rapidly increasing demand of filters in OEMs as well as the aftermarkets of China, India, and Germany.

For market expansion, report suggests innovation and new product development to enhance the filter performance. The report further suggests the development of partnerships with customers to create win-win situations and development of low-cost solutions for customers.

Emerging trends, which have a direct impact on the dynamics of the industry, include the development of filters with organic materials, development of polyurethane-based adhesive filters, and customizable air filter concept.

Major manufacturers are Mann+Hummel Holding GmbH, Mahle International GmbH, Donaldson Company, Inc., Sogefi SpA and NGK Insulators Ltd.

Key Topics Covered:

1. Executive Summary

2. The Automotive Filter Market Background and Classifications

3. Market Trends and Forecast Analysis

4. Competitor Analysis

5. Growth Opportunity and Strategic Analysis

6. Company Profiles of Leading Players

- Donaldson Company Inc.

- Mahle International GmbH

- Mann+Hummel Holding GmbH

- NGK Insulators Ltd.

- Sogefi SpA

For more information visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/6d7cx5/the_global

View source version on businesswire.com: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20160516006136/en/

Global Automotive Filter Market 2016-2021: Market is Forecast to Grow at a CAGR of 4.9%

Dublin, May 16, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Research and Markets has announced the addition of the “The Global Automotive Filter Market 2016-2021: Trend, Forecast and Opportunity Analysis” report to their offering.



The global automotive filter market is forecast to grow at a CAGR of 4.9% from 2016 to 2021

The major drivers of growth for this market are increase in the production of vehicles, increasing focus of vehicle owners on preventive maintenance, increasing average age of vehicles in operation, and increasing miles driven per vehicle.

In this market, oil filter, air filter, fuel filter, and cabin air filter are some of the major segments of automotive filters. On the basis of its comprehensive research, the author forecasts that the fuel filter and cabin air filter segments are expected to show above average growth during the forecast period.

Within the global automotive filter market, the oil filter segment is expected to remain as the largest market. Rising vehicle production and increasing demand from original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and aftermarket is expected to spur growth for this segment over the forecast period.

Asia Pacific is expected to remain the largest market due to high vehicle production, improvement in the economic conditions, and increasing investments by the industry players within the APAC region.

North America and Asia Pacific are expected to witness significant growth over the forecast period because of rapidly increasing demand of filters in OEMs as well as the aftermarkets of China, India, and Germany.

For market expansion, report suggests innovation and new product development to enhance the filter performance. The report further suggests the development of partnerships with customers to create win-win situations and development of low-cost solutions for customers.

Emerging trends, which have a direct impact on the dynamics of the industry, include the development of filters with organic materials, development of polyurethane-based adhesive filters, and customizable air filter concept.

Major manufacturers are Mann+Hummel Holding GmbH, Mahle International GmbH, Donaldson Company, Inc., Sogefi SpA and NGK Insulators Ltd.

Key Topics Covered:

1. Executive Summary

2. The Automotive Filter Market Background and Classifications

3. Market Trends and Forecast Analysis

4. Competitor Analysis

5. Growth Opportunity and Strategic Analysis

6. Company Profiles of Leading Players

- Donaldson Company Inc.
- Mahle International GmbH
- Mann+Hummel Holding GmbH
- NGK Insulators Ltd.
- Sogefi SpA

For more information visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/gsnhv8/the_global


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