incan

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The Incan stonework is famous for it’s large stones (some over 100 tons) that fit so precisely together that “not even a knife could be inserted between the joints.”

How the Incans were able to transport these massive building blocks and handled is something we don’t quite understand today. What we do know is that the cutting marks on some of the stone blocks are very similar to those found on the pyramidion of the unfinished obelisk in Egypt. 

SOURCE

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Jaguar

Aztec: The powers of darkness in conflict with the solar eagle.

Mexican: The messenger of forest spirits.

Shamanistic: The jaguar is sometimes a familiar spirit of, or a form taken by, the Shaman.

[Source: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of Traditional Symbols by J.C. Cooper]

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TInca Písac, the Incan ruins situated atop a hill at the entrance to the valley, located in Peru. It is unknown when Inca Písac was built, though it does not appear to have been inhabited by any pre-Inca civilization.

Many have speculated why this site was initially constructed. Kim MacQuarrie states that Pachacuti (the ninth Sapa Inca of the Kingdom of Cusco) erected a number royal estates to memorialize victories over other ethnic groups. These include: Písac (victory over the Cuyos), Machu Picchu (conquest of the Vilcabamba Valley), and Ollantaytambo (victory over the Tambos). Some other historians suggest that it was built to protect Cusco from possible attacks of the Antis nations.

Agricultural terraces (see photo 2) on the steep hillside were constructed by the Inca, which are still used today. The ruins have been separated into 4 groups: Pisaqa, Kinchiracay, Q'allaqasa, and Intihuatana (which includes the Temple of the Sun, altars, baths, a ceremonial platform).

Photos courtesy & taken by Benjamin Dumas.

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Choquequirao is a 15th and 16th century settlement associated with the Incan Empire, or more correctly Tawantinsuyu. The site had two major growth stages. This could be explained if Pachacuti founded Choquequirao and his son, Tupaq Inka Yupanki, remodeled and extended it after becoming the Sapa Inka. Choquequirao is located in the area considered to be Pachacuti’s estate; which includes the areas around the rivers Amaybamba, Urabamba, Vilcabamba, Victos and Apurímac. Other sites in this area are Saywite, Machu Picchu, Chachapampa (Chachabamba), Chuqisuyuy(Choquesuysuy) and Wamanmarka (Guamanmarca); all of which share similar architectural styles with Choquequirao. The architectural style of several important features appears to be of Chachapoya design, suggesting that Chachapoya workers were probably involved in the construction. This suggests that Tupaq Inka probably ordered the construction. Colonial documents also suggest that Tupaq Inka ruled Choquequirao since his great grandson, Tupa Sayri, claimed ownership of the site and neighboring lands during Spanish colonization.

It was one of the last bastions of resistance and refuge of the Son of the Sun (the “Inca”), Manco Inca Yupanqui, who fled Cusco after his siege of the city failed in 1535.

According to the Peruvian Tourism Office, “Choquequirao was probably one of the entrance check points to the Vilcabamba, and also an administrative hub serving political, social and economic functions. Its urban design has followed the symbolic patterns of the imperial capital, with ritual places dedicated to Inti (the Incan sun god) and the ancestors, to the earth, water and other divinities, with mansions for administrators and houses for artisans, warehouses, large dormitories or kallankas and farming terraces belonging to the Inca or the local people. Spreading over 700 meters, the ceremonial area drops as much as 65 meters from the elevated areas to the main square." The city also played an important role as a link between theAmazon Jungle and the city of Cusco.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choquequirao

Emotional Frequency: Why Are Many Old Souls Empaths?

Some of you may have heard of Empaths: people who are known for their highly developed ability to sense the emotions and thoughts of the people around them.

You might have heard all the symptoms of being an Empath; finding public places overwhelming, confusing others emotions with your own and absorbing them like an “emotional sponge“, finding films/images of violence or cruelty unbearable, feeling other people’s physical pains, being a great listener, suffering from fatigue, needing solitude to recharge and even experiencing the emotions of loved ones who are far away. But most articles fail to answer why this occurs.

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