inary

anonymous asked:

Can you recommend me some good anime/ mangas to watch/ read? But not popular ones. Thanks

ohoho you are in the right blog my love

Anime

Toshokan sensō

Ikoku meiro no croisée

3-gatsu no Lion

Natsume Yuujinchou (This is so good yet so underwatched)

Akatsuki no yona (The anime is like the best thing sp has ever done and yet it is so underated)

91 days

Aoi Bungaku Series

  Bokurano

Donten ni Warau

Drifters

Gugure! Kokkuri-san

Higashi no Eden

Houkago no Pleiades

Inari, Konkon, Koi Iroha.

Kamichu!

Kanojo to Kanojo no Neko: Everything Flows

Shouwa Genroku Rakugo Shinjuu

Kuzu no honkai

I will post the manga list later

Me Preparing for a Binge Watching Session of Anime

Me:

20~ minutes = 1 ep (without ads/op/ending)

20~ mins x 3 eps = 1 h

1 season = 12 eps/24 eps

20~ mins x 12eps = 240 mins = 4 h

240 mins x 2 = 480 mins = 8 h

Originally posted by thelazyslytherin

Speak Softly and Carry a Big Stick

Your roomie freshman year calls herself Inari, like the sushi, which you try not to roll your eyes at. It’s obviously a weaboo thing, since she’s definitely not anywhere near Japanese with her red-blonde hair and blue eyes. She also has two dads who work for the forest service - one blond and stocky, the other tall and red-haired, and they both call her Flower when they kiss her goodbye before leaving. You’re too polite to ask which one is her real dad.

There’s far weirder stuff at university to worry about than that.

Inari (who, thank god, doesn’t put up anime posters or talk about manga and maybe you were wrong about the nickname?) pays as much lip service to the weird traditions of Elsewhere as everyone else does, and a few more besides. She accepts them without comment when other people laugh them off, like they’re common sense, like she’s done it all her life. When people whisper about seeing things in the deep end of the pool or in the forest or in the depths of the library, she doesn’t blink an eye. When you whisper to her one night that you think these strange traditions might actually be in place for a reason she says “of course they are.” Like she’s known all along.

Inari wears her iron and carries her salt, but she doesn’t add to the stories and the gossip and hysteria. She’s aiming for law school, which you can already tell that she’ll be great at. You share theology and history and you’ve never seen her lose a debate. She’s crafty and smart and more focused than anyone else you’ve met at Elsewhere, and you wonder if she’s decided she just doesn’t have time for the stories. You wonder how someone can both accept and completely ignore The Neighbours. You wish you could.

Then Apples from your lit class gets replaced by something Else, and her girlfriend spends the evening bawling in your room  Inari listens, then sighs, and packs a bag. Then she pulls a rusty iron bar out of her closet, and heads out into the forest under the cover of moonlight. You don’t want to watch, you don’t want to think about what might happen. You clench your iron medallion tighter and try to tell yourself that the hulking dark shape that appears next to her is just the shadows of the trees, that you didn’t see the moonlight glint off green, inhuman eyes.

(You never expect to see her again.)

Except she comes back, and Apples is back in her place, seeming none the worse for wear (though she leaves paper-wrapped notebooks by the fountain every full moon until she graduates). Inari says nothing, but during finals she disappears into the library after someone else, clutching her her iron bar and accompanied by a tall man in a black frock coat.

“How do you do it?” You ask when you can’t stand not knowing. “How do you know…”

Inari shrugs. “My fairy godfather taught me how to be the right kind of persuasive. It’s simple once you know how. You speak softly… and carry a big stick.”

You hope that in this case, fairy godfather is some queer term. You’re afraid to ask her clarify.

After that the whispers start. That if you’re desperate to get someone back, you go to Inari, who never seems particularly happy, but eventually accepts most pleas. She can’t and won’t help everyone, of course. If your friend was desperate enough to kiss Anna Monday there’s nothing to be done. And she always asks for a favor in return, to be held in trust until a time of her choosing.

A favor in trust is a serious price, at Elsewhere. But at least Inari is human, they reason, staring at her bare hand wrapped around the iron bar.

At least she seems human enough.

x