in-transit-in-film

Some long thoughts on a few #Gates

Right, I’m back and plan on reopening my asks soon-ish. Before I do that, though, I just want to address a few of the big dramas that unfolded in my absence. This is mainly so that I won’t end up addressing these questions through various ask replies, so if I don’t respond to your message it’s probably because I’ve said the last thing I’m going to say about it here. Onward!

On #RomanceGate

As we have previously established thanks to a tweet from David Kamp with the full, unedited transcript of the excerpt of the interview pertinent to romance, the published Vanity Fair article did not fully reflect what Rian was actually trying to say about the question of romance in Episode VIII. The Vanity Fair article said this:

FIVE THINGS THAT ARE NOT IN THE LAST JEDI

A big, central-to-the-plot romance. For all the fan-fiction fantasies of “Reylo” (an imagined union of Daisy Ridley’s Rey and Adam Driver’s Kylo Ren) or “Stormpilot” (the same, for John Boyega’s ex-stormtrooper Finn and Oscar Isaac’s pilot Poe Dameron), Johnson says that The Last Jedi offers “no one-to-one equivalent of the Han-to-Leia, burning, unrequited love. In our story, that’s not a centerpiece.”

And this is what was actually said between Kamp and Johnson in the interview:

Now, what initially seemed to rule out any inclusion of romance in The Last Jedi actually suggests something quite different - Rian seems to be saying that he was keen to include a big, sweeping romance, but that when it came to it the characters didn’t seem to be in the right place for that to happen. He doesn’t at all rule out subtle traces of romance or flirtation (as Kamp highlights in his tweet), thus the classic ‘wait and see’-style response. 

It is also very important to point out that the references to Reylo and StormPilot were clearly Kamp editorialising. While terms like ‘imagined’ and ‘fan-fiction fantasies’ sting to anyone familiar with all of the misogynistic BS female fans have to deal with for daring to be interested in the human relationships in these stories, as I see it the references to popular ships are simply there to provide context for the mainstream audience and boost SEO rankings. Rian Johnson has been very emphatic about distancing himself from Kamp’s phrasing, and the full quote makes it clear that no specific relationships were raised in the context of the original interview.

So, while I still think we need to be cautious and keep expectations for an overt Reylo romance in The Last Jedi low (as Rian says, there is no central romance plot in his film), I certainly think that the full quote should relieve the anxiety that love and attraction won’t be in play to some extent. Although I don’t think that we’re going to get a Reylo kiss (that’s my opinion re. The Last Jedi - come back to me after December to get my thoughts on Episode IX), it clearly isn’t out of the question that The Last Jedi will progress Rey and Kylo so that they are ready for a full-blown romance in the next film. I can’t stress enough that Rey and Kylo end The Force Awakens on different sides, with Kylo having killed his father and Rey having just slashed Kylo’s face open. They both have huge personal journeys to go on (Rey has to come into her own in the Force, and Kylo has to wake up to Snoke’s evil and show remorse for his terrible mistakes) before they can truly go on a journey together. Essentially, to progress from the current state of affairs to a consummated love affair in the space of a single movie would, to put it mildly, be pushing it. 

Speaking for myself, I would be ecstatic if The Last Jedi simply shows Rey and Kylo developing empathy and perhaps even compassion for each other. Rey has already defeated Kylo in a duel, so their journey together going forward won’t simply be one of antagonism - as J.J. said in his commentary (which was recorded after he had read the script for The Last Jedi), Kylo is “a character who [Rey’s] going to have a very interesting relationship with moving forward”. In short, I have no fear that the dynamic between Rey and Kylo Ren is going to remain static or be less important going forward. Rey and Kylo are crucial to each other’s stories, and we have every reason to believe that Rian is honouring that. 

On #PlotGate

These are the tweets that started the famous #PlotGate:

Now, this actually didn’t worry me at all. But why would I - one of the people who has written thousands of words analysing the minutia of The Force Awakens - be unconcerned by the suggestion that Rian could do whatever the hell he wanted in The Last Jedi? Why am I not freaking out when there doesn’t seem to be a plan for the trilogy?

Well, the simple answer is that I’m not alarmed because these kinds of sentiments are far from new. From the very beginning, the narrative has always been that each filmmaker has a considerable degree of freedom to tell the story they want to tell. For a great explanation of how the early development of The Last Jedi worked, see this quote from J.J. Abrams from November 2015 (particularly the bold bits):

The script for VIII is written. I’m sure rewrites are going to be endless, like they always are. But what Larry and I did was set up certain key relationships, certain key questions, conflicts. And we knew where certain things were going. We had meetings with Rian and Ram Bergman, the producer of VIII. They were watching dailies when we were shooting our movie. We wanted them to be part of the process, to make the transition to their film as seamless as possible. I showed Rian an early cut of the movie, because I knew he was doing his rewrite and prepping. And as executive producer of VIII, I need that movie to be really good. Withholding serves no one and certainly not the fans. So we’ve been as transparent as possible. Rian has asked for a couple of things here and there that he needs for his story. He is an incredibly accomplished filmmaker and an incredibly strong writer. So the story he told took what we were doing and went in the direction that he felt was best but that is very much in line with what we were thinking as well. But you’re right—that will be his movie; he’s going to do it in the way he sees fit. He’s neither asking for nor does he need me to oversee the process.

There are endless quotes from J.J. and Kathleen Kennedy supporting this picture, and I think this is exactly as it should be. Rian is not making The Last Jedi in a vacuum - he is building it on the foundation set by The Force Awakens, and had a say on the development and presentation of that film so that it would weave seamlessly into his movie. Rian even reiterated this sentiment himself in the main Vanity Fair article on The Last Jedi:

J.J. and Larry and Michael set everybody up in a really evocative way in VII and started them on a trajectory.

Rian is insistent on stressing his independence as a filmmaker at every stage because people are keen to paint him as a slave to the Walt Disney Company’s whims. At every turn, he has to deal with people assuming that The Last Jedi will repeat the trick played by The Force Awakens by mirroring its famous and beloved antecedent - for The Force Awakens this was Star Wars, and people expect it to be The Empire Strikes Back for The Last Jedi. Understandably, Rian wants to stress that The Last Jedi is his baby - it’s infused with his own creativity rather than studio notes and nostalgia. 

But, at the same time, that doesn’t mean that Rian can do whatever the hell he wants. I can almost guarantee that Rian would have received furious correctional notes if he had tried to pitch a story where Rey Rey Binks died in the second act. There will be certain strands established in The Force Awakens that The Last Jedi will nurture and evolve, and Rian will be taking pre-existing characters and relationships and building on them further. As Pablo appeased an anxious fan on Twitter:

In short, there absolutely is collaboration - between the individual filmmakers, and between the filmmakers and Lucasfilm. Rian is free to tell the story he wants to tell, but that story has a baseline in The Force Awakens and also has a responsibility to establish a platform for Colin Trevorrow to build on with Episode IX. The filmmakers are talking to each other, and there is absolutely collaboration and handoff between them so that these film will ultimately make sense as a trilogy as well as on their own terms. 

In other words, I really don’t see much to worry about. I have seen nothing but praise for the script for The Last Jedi, and Rian’s filmography amply demonstrates his talent as both a writer and a director. 

I’m as excited for The Last Jedi as I ever was, so I hope I’ve been able to put some people’s minds to rest with this. Bring on December!

bounding-heart  asked:

Hi. I reblogged your post about the Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban and then got an anon asking me to elaborate on the thematic complexity of the film. Given it was your post, I was wondering if you'd write a bit more on the subject? I'd love to hear your thoughts. :)

Hello! 

I’m honored that you reached out to me about this movie; it’s one of my favorite films of all time, and I could write novels about it if I could.

Now, consider this: it’s 2004 and we’re seeing Prisoner of Azkaban for the first time. We as an audience have just gone through two films that mapped out the typical hero’s journey; Voldemort’s the antagonist, and Harry’s the hero that vanquishes him. Black-and-white narratives, clear borders to who’s noble and who’s evil. However, in PoA, we realize that these borders are actually very ambiguous, and Alfonso Cuarón exploits this concept quite beautifully in this film. 

Take the title card. 

Have you noticed what’s different from its predecessors? 

The logo’s no longer golden. 

It’s silver and gray, displaying both lightness and darkness in every letter. In fact, the very location where the logo floats around emulates light in a dark environment. Out of context, we can’t figure out where it even is, whereas in the previous films, we clearly see the logo floating around in the skies. This tactic foreshadows that there’s going to be a sense of ambiguity in PoA over what is good and what is evil, instead of giving us a clear cut story of the noble hero getting introduced to a magical and mysterious world [the golden logo with a stormy background in Philosopher’s Stone] or the valiant hero defeating the malignant villain [the sun shooting through the dark clouds in Chamber of Secrets]. Some examples of moral ambiguity in PoA include Sirius Black, who gets sent to Azkaban for a crime he didn’t commit; Remus Lupin, an inherently good person, but labeled as evil by society in the end since he’s a werewolf; Pettigrew, an individual that turned to the dark side out of cowardice and fear, instead of devotion to Voldemort. 

PoA’s title card can also be taken more literally; since this is the transition film that’s going to set up much more heavier tones in the future, we’re going to be exposed to a lot more dark elements of the magical world in this movie. 

Here’s a scene where Cuarón again emphasizes lightness and darkness, but with different thematic meanings. 

We see a snowy Hogwarts, where everything is light until…

…the camera focuses on the clock and Harry behind it, who’s completely enveloped in darkness. 

In contrast, his classmates play and prank each other in the light snow while they get ready to go to Hogsmeade. 

Just from this single scene, Cuarón displays that Harry, surrounded by darkness, will always be separate from the other students at Hogwarts. No one in Hogwarts has dark forces threatening to consume them every waking moment. Everyone’s still able to enjoy the happiness and privileges of childhood innocence, while Harry’s had that innocence snatched away as a baby and grows constantly aware that a dark wizard plans on destroying him. This difference can also be seen without much cinematic analyzation; since Voldemort killed Lily and James, Harry’s had no one to sign the permission slip that allows him to go to Hogsmeade trips (Vernon and Petunia would have never signed it even though Vernon made a deal with Harry; let’s be realistic). 

Now, let’s talk about one of my favorite shots of the film. 

The camera zooms in on the dark Grim residing within the light tea cup, foreshadowing the dark forces that Harry must face. However, I also love this shot because it’s the second time we see the Grim as an evil omen—a red herring for the audience to consume. Cuarón wants his viewers to be afraid of the literal black dog and for them to associate it with evil, which fools non-readers into believing that Sirius Black is who the Grim was foreshadowing, since Sirius can turn into a literal giant black dog. However, once watchers get informed that Sirius is innocent, they finally realize that the evil force wasn’t Sirius after all; it was Pettigrew, who with his escape, finally turns the wheels in motion for Voldemort’s reemergence, and thus puts Harry in grave danger. 

Another great scene that shows many thematic layers? Our first glimpse of the Great Hall. 

The candles and the flames at the sides of the walls give the Great Hall a warm, golden atmosphere. However, we also see the tall windows behind the choir, dark with rain and lightning—a stark contrast to the rest of the Hall, implying that this comforting, light atmosphere of Hogwarts will be short lived. In addition, the choir sings an ominous song to the students, with lyrics lifted straight out of the Three Witches’ dialogue in Shakespeare’s Macbeth (”by the pricking of my thumbs, something wicked this way comes”), a famous Elizabethan play that coincidentally also analyzes moral ambiguity. 

With this discordant atmosphere, Cuarón gives us a sense of uneasiness despite the welcome and safe environment of Hogwarts we’ve grown familiar with in the previous two films. The message? There’s a greater form of darkness coming, so strap yourselves in: this ain’t your typical Columbus narrative. And he certainly delivers on this part; other factors besides Voldemort portray the darker areas of the magical world and there’s no happy or satisfactory victory to celebrate at the end of the film. 

I could go on about Prisoner of Azkaban, but I’m afraid that’ll make this post too long for anyone to read! But thank you for the ask; it was so much fun to analyze this film again.  

For more info, Nerdwriter1 has this beautiful video of this film and I think this user has a simply amazing analysis

Bugs Bunny (Spock x Reader)

Summary: request from @blueoftheenterprise : I recently found your blog and let me tell you I really love your fics! Are you taking requests for Spock? If you do I really could use some motivation fics at the moment so could you do a bullied!reader x Spock in which the reader loves Spock but does nothing because she doesn’t think she deserves him? If you need more detail you can DM me 😘 Thank you!

Warnings: Bullying, Language

Pairing: Spock x Reader

a/n: OK so this is my first non-Jim request. Firstly thanks for the opportunity to do something different i hope you like it! Secondly I hope I’ve done Spock enough justice for this to be enjoyable. We jump straight in so just in case it’s a sensitive issue for some I’ve put everything under the cut.

Words: 1,581

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

what do you think tomorrows vid is gonna be

hopefully a rebrand bitch! complete with dan howell name changes on all social media and a smooth transition from filming in the old apartment to the new house! smiley dan with curly hair and a positive attitude! a phil appearance! 

huffingtonpost.com
Short Documentary Brings Transgender Narrative To Global Audiences
Authentic LGBTQ narratives like 'Where We Are Now' are even more necessary now more than ever.

In June 2016, Scottish artist filmmaker Lucie Rachel released Where We Are Now, an insightful personal documentary about the relationship between a young bisexual woman and her transgender parent, who recently made the decision to transition. The moving 9-minute film presents viewers with a rare, intimate look at a non-heteronormative family. 

anonymous asked:

Listen that part in the festive ditl where dan filmed Phil's ass and said butt, giggles then used the chrome cast as an excuse still has me shook. Bc I watch rose and r*sie and they did the exact same thing, only when asked if rose was filming r's butt she says uh no I was filming the floor! Look at that craftsmanship on that tile! I think of that parallel a lot and cry.

k but dans play on words and that smooth transition from filming phils butt to filming the chrome cast to seem more nonchalant.. usually i wouldnt compliment danisnotonfire but that move was flawless

THANK YOU, GEORGE

Thank you for giving me the films that saw me through late childhood and adolescence and that meant and still mean so much to me. 

Thank you for giving me the characters (Padme Amidala, the handmaidens) that made me run home from the theater, put on the most outlandish clothes I could find, grab a water-pistol and pretend to save a planet. My family were stunned – I was, for the first time in my life, identifying with a set of characters on the silver-screen, instead of responding with cold apathy.  

Thank you for giving me the wider set of characters (Qui-Gon, Obi-Wan, Padme, Anakin. Shmi) that led me to writing and reading fan-fiction and being first introduced to fannish transformative works. 

Thank you for giving me the stories that gave birth to my first ever ships (Anakin/Padme, Qui-Gon/Obi-Wan, Anakin/Obi-Wan), that were the backbone of my fandom participation and the thread that led to many decade-long friendships. Also, the thread that led to me finding out I’m anything but straight!

Thank you for giving me the world (Naboo) that I still fantasize about living on, to this day, to the point where there are Star Wars games (such as the SW Galaxies emulator) that I’ll play only so I can wander around and raise a house on the green fields of Naboo. 

Thank you for giving me the cinematography, the visuals, the environments, that are now what I generally prefer and ask from sci-fi entertainment (alien baroque elegance). 

Thank you for making my transition from predominantly Bollywood / Tollywood films to Western cinema far less jarring and displeasing than it would have otherwise been. 

Thank you for making a Star Wars fan out of me, whereas before TPM’s premiere I was lukewarm and didn’t care about much outside the Luke - Vader dynamic. 

Thank you, George, for everything you’ve given me. Even today, I can’t see a clip or a still from TPM, AOTC, ROTS without a general feeling of warmth and happiness and familiarity. 

Amandla Stenberg

Amandla is a nonbinary African-American and Danish-American activist, actor and singer. Amandla is known for their acting prowess in films and performances such as, Colombiana (2011),  The Hunger Games (2012),  Sleepy Hollow (2013), As You Are (2016), and Beyoncé: Lemonade (2016).

Amandla Stenberg was born on October 23, 1998 in Los Angeles, California to parents Karen Brailsford and Tom Stenberg. Amandla’s name means power and strength in Zulu and Xhosa. At the age of four, Amandla made their public debut when they were featured in a Disney catalog and went on to star in numerous commercials for brands including McDonald’s and Walmart.

Amandla made a transition into film in 2010 when they began filming the action-thriller Colombiana (2011). Since then they have demonstrated an innate ability to capture the hearts of viewers worldwide. For their role as Rue in The Hunger Games (2012), Amandla was nominated for an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture. Amandla is also a talented musician and can play the violin, drums and guitar. In 2013 Amandla began performing violin and singing at venues across Los Angeles. Later the same year, they dropped their self titled EP.

Amandla Stenberg is a voice for young, Black, and LGBT millennials. Amandla is passionate about fair and diverse representation evidenced by their viral video “Don’t Cash Crop My Cornrows” which unpacked the baggage of cultural appropriation. Amandla was invited to the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Foundation to participate in the dedication ceremony where they paid tribute to the four young girls who were killed in the tragic Birmingham church bombing. Amandla is one of the most brilliant and outspoken actors of their generation. They take a multimedia approach to activism using film, social media, and music to bring more diversity in media, to build safer spaces, and to create more political agency for all people.

Dazed Magazine called Amandla Stenberg “one of the most incendiary voices of [their] generation.” Time Magazine named Amandla one of the 30 Most Influential Teens of 2015 and again in 2016. They have been interviewed by Solange Knowles for Teen Vogue and have been deemed an “icon of change” by ELLE UK. Oprah Winfrey recognized Amandla’s work and invited them to talk about authenticity in activism for Super Soul Sunday. Amandla is also the recipient of the BET Awards’ Young Stars Award. They have also been named Feminist Celebrity of the Year by the Ms. Foundation for Women. Amandla is a youth ambassador for No Kid Hungry and supports the Ubuntu Education Fund.

anonymous asked:

you said there was a similarity between clarke and bellamy in 4x01, but i couldnt see it. what do you mean by that?

i don’t think you’ll ever know how glad i am that you didn’t say ‘parallel’. i am a film student and i am so sick of that word lol (thx fandom). this might just be me but i personally think it’s not a particularly productive way to call everything a parallel. there is quite a difference between having a similar scene and an actual parallel that you will immediately catch. i feel that most people in this fandom don’t seem to understand the difference since they keep using that term in cases in which it should not be used. so yea, kudos to you for not going with that one. either way though. yes, i did say that there are obvious similarities (or at least that’s how i look at them) in how the writers decided to deal with bellamy’s and clarke’s respective individual arcs and how they managed to fuse them together by the end of the episode, and i’m gonna stand by that interpretation for now, because it makes the most sense to me.

(i dont have much time so i’mma have to keep this short)

i found 4x01 to be fascinating on many levels, from the intense focus on interpersonal relationships to the political/universal conflicts/issues. we get a lot of information in this ep alone and it’s all bewildering as much as it is exciting, because shit is gonna hit the fan real fucking fast. what caught my attention regarding bellamy and clarke though is this: you have an interplay between the visual, emotional camerawork and the written, intellectual narrative (text) that creates an expression of continuation within their personal relationship.

let’s start with the obvious: both characters deal with their dead loved ones in this episode (lexa and gina).

Keep reading

spin.com
Report: Donald Trump Plans to Eliminate National Endowment for the Arts, Privatize Corporation for Public Broadcasting
Donald Trump's transition team is eyeing staggering cuts to the federal agencies that support the arts, humanities, and public broadcasting, the Hill reports. Under the team's plan, the non-profit Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which supports public television, public radio, and PBS, would be privatized. The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), which offer grants for artistic and educational productions, exhibitions, research, and more, would be eliminated entirely. As The Hill points out, the proposed plan hews closely to a blueprint prepared by conservative think tank the Heritage Foundation, which has had an outsize influence on the staffing and direction of the new administration. Two transition team members reportedly discussing the cuts to arts funding, Russ Vought and John Gray, previously worked for the Heritage Foundation, and for vice president-elect Mike Pence. The U.S. has always trailed countries like Canada and

Everyone, everyone on this page should be blowing up phones and trying to shut this shit down. Not cutting military spending, no bail outs for corporations and major tax cuts. We’re saving money by shutting down the arts. And privatizing PBS.

This is absolute bullshit.

This is my first ever video that I’ve directed, edited, and/or published! Learned a lot in the process of making this today and I’m excited to start pursuing video work.

Key takeaways : film more than 4 minutes worth of shots if you’re going to make a 50 second clip, film with purpose, learn to splice music better, learn what transitions do and how to film for them, and read up on color grading.

If you have any critiques, please give them! I am not shy nor will it hurt my feelings. I really want to puruse this after having tried it for the first time, and I will respect any comments or help given.

‘Scuse me, Ms. Rowling

If you’re going to tell us that Cursed Child isn’t about to be made into a movie (and, by transitive logic, filmed in its staged production format), then tell your actors to stop tweeting “you’ll just have to wait to see it live.” 

Almost none of us are ever going to be able to see it live. There are rumors of a Broadway run, but, again, almost None.None% of the fans will get to see the show. 

Give. Us. A. Flipping. Filmed. Version. Harry potter is for everyone. Keeping it in its theatre format denies 99% of fans the pleasure of experiencing something magical.