in other news i will be playing 2007 john green when they get around to making the movie about him

NATALIE DORMER FOR FLARE MAGAZINE

British actress Natalie Dormer stars in two of today’s biggest franchises: The Hunger Games and Game of Thrones. We took a stroll around the famed V&A Museum with the period-piece queen.

“I’m so happy you wanted to come here—I love this place!” Natalie Dormer greets me with a kiss on each cheek at the entrance to London’s Victoria and Albert Museum, home to the biggest collection of decorative art and design in the world. The actress was easy to spot by her beacon-like blonde hair, though I recognized it only after watching her pose for FLARE the day before; I’d come to know Dormer as a brunette, in the role of sultry Margaery Tyrell in HBO’s most-watched (and the world’s most-pirated) series ever: the epic fantasy drama Game of Thrones (returning to HBO Canada this spring).

“I’m a natural blonde!” she exclaims. “It was funny because for the shoot yesterday, the hairstylist drew in roots. I was like, ‘You’re undermining me here, I’ve been telling people for years I’m really a blonde!’” She fidgets with the hair in question as she speaks, flipping luxurious swaths from one side of her head to the other. It’s so thick, I almost don’t notice the patch on the lower left side of her scalp where it’s only a few centimetres long, a remnant of her role in Mockingjay: Part 1 (out Nov. 21) and Mockingjay: Part 2. The films will complete the box office–devouring Hunger Games quadrilogy— worldwide gross so far: $1.68 billion—based on the young-adult books by Suzanne Collins.

Dormer, 32, plays Cressida, a documentary filmmaker who joins Jennifer Lawrence’s Katniss in her rebellion against the government of their dystopian nation, Panem. Even with blonde hair and minus the medievally garb of the default Dormer of my imagination—today she’s wearing a grey silk blouse (“from Topshop or something”) over Rag & Bone skinny jeans and ankle boots—there’s no mistaking her: the feline slant of her eyes, the swoop of her nose, the asymmetrical smile, like an artist has rendered each feature with a playful flourish. Hollywood, and the world, may be overrun with towheads, but there’s only one face like that.

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