in order to maximize profits

anonymous asked:

Ooohh what are the YouTube conspiracies???

less of conspiracies and more …straight up facts tbh & im too Tired™ to explain rn but maybe i will eventually ?
but basically youtube as a corporation is incredibly powerful, and has a lot of power over creators and while it used to be a site where people could be themselves and make a living with whatever videos they make that people organically want to watch, it is becoming much like TV networks where creators are praised for “family friendly” / politically neutral content and punished for anything else. & dnp are smart guys who see this happening and have decided that they’re gonna try to stay on youtubes good side (pandering to young audiences, avoiding controversy, following trends) in order to keep maximizing their profit & to stay relevant.

not to say it’s a bad thing that they’re doing it, but i think it’s important to realize they aren’t doing the same stuff on youtube that they were doing at the start. they’re very produced and scripted and censored now, and we can’t even know the extent to which higher forces influence their content, and to me it all just feels very unsettling.

Godzilla 2016 wishlist

I got this question a couple a’ times, and figured it’d be a nice break from work to vocalize my hopes, despite that neither Anno nor Higuchi will probably see this ;)

NO “BIG 5″ - I think we can all agree that, between the general heaping we usually get, and the upcoming sequels from Legendary, I think we’ll all be fine without Mothra, Rodan, MechaGodzilla, and King Ghidorah for a film or two. While the US-produced films unfortunately NEED the classics in order to maximize their profitability (because, let’s face it, those are the only characters the moviegoing public are even slightly familiar with), this new Japanese series (at least we can HOPE it will become a series) will have room to innovate and explore new ideas. And speaking of…

EXPLORE NEW - AND OLD - IDEAS - Just because I’d rather not see Mothra fight Godzilla YET AGAIN doesn’t mean that I don’t want to see some classic ideas and characters explored. Anno and Higuchi are extremely vocal about their love of classic tokusatsu, and it’s obvious from series like Evangelion and Gunbuster that Anno has a lot of fondness for the niceties of the mecha genre…and you know what would be a marvelously fun idea to integrate into the new Godzilla film? ATRAGON. I’d LOVE to see Higuchi tackle a delightfully retro, yet still appropriately updated take on the Gohten. The Gotengo from Final Wars was fun and all, but with the attention to detail Higuchi brings to the table, imagine the intricate tech that could be on display - dozens of shifting locks, massive ventilation systems, and a badass launching sequence could be a hardware-lover’s dream when put onscreen.
And let’s not forget some cameos by classic kaiju. Hell, even a one-off creature for Godzilla to kill, not unlike Kamoebas, would be a welcome addition. How about a creepy new version of Kamacuras? Or maybe even Gezora? How about Baragon or Anguirus as something Godzilla briefly tussles with? (Let’s not kill Angy right out the gate).
But should there be a whole other monster? Well…

MAYBE NOT A NEW ENEMY MONSTER JUST YET Higuchi has already hinted at a “greatest worst nightmare,” which implies a villainous Godzilla. And Anno’s penchant for apocalyptic themes pretty much ensures that. After all, Godzilla may be “King of the Monsters,” but he’s also called “The God of Destruction” in his home country. The Japanese LOVE them some “Destroyer of Worlds” Goji. That and the obvious callback to 1954 in the teaser image kinda’ locks all that together.
BUT, giving Godzilla an enemy to battle sometimes means putting him in the hero’s role. Personally, I felt this worked for Godzilla (2014). It gave Godzilla a nice bit of characterization, without making him OVERLY sympathetic. BUT, if this new Godzilla is going to be a destructive force, then it’d be in the film’s interest to make him humanity’s enemy first, at least in my opinion. You could create a new monster that somehow fights for humanity, but it runs the risk of over-complicating matters and focusing too much of the story on the new monster, something that many folks took issue with for G’14.
Ergo, this is why I singled-out the Atragon in the last point. A film that features a classic-style Atragon heavily would earn some major geek cred, and also provide a means for the humans to battle Godzilla directly in a way we don’t see often (besides, the Atragon/Gotengo barely even got to fight Godzilla in Final Wars, so how’s about another round?!).
Besides, I’m a little tired of “Godzilla vs. Blank.” Let’s shake things up and make the next movie more about multiple forces trying to take Godzilla down.

What are YOUR thoughts and hopes for the new movie?

Capital is fundamentally the use of money to make more money. In order to maximize profits, a capitalist must be prepared to shift production from a less profitable commodity to a more profitable one, and this implies a stance of indifference to use-value. Whatever his personal attachment to vanilla ice cream, a capitalist will produce less vanilla and more chocolate ice cream if it is profitable to do so. Similarly because labour-power is commodified, capitalists can hire or fire labour-power as required to maximize profits with total indifference to the human suffering that this may cause.

Indifference to use-value is also indifference to human values and human beings. Thus capitalists, if not constrained by outside forces, will have no concern for the working conditions of their workers or their lives. Unless constrained by law or by worker organization, capitalists will always try to get the most work from workers for the least pay.
—  Robert Albritton, Marx’s Value Theory and Subjectivity (2003)

i love those posts that claim that if giant corporations paid their employees a fair wage they would be forced to raise their prices dramatically, as if they’re charitable outfits that never charge more than they absolutely have to, out of the goodness of their hearts

nah they charge as much as they can get away with, and pay as little as they can get away with, in order to maximize profit, welcome to capitalism

Never forget that Virginia Slims cigarettes- a toxic, highly addictive, cancer-causing product- a product that literally kills people- adopted feminist and women’s-lib rhetoric to peddle their wares… to great success.

Never forget that Virginia Slims cigarettes used feminist language to tap into a new demographic in order to maximize profit and get more people hooked on their dangerous product.

All under the guise of “liberation” “freedom” and “self-expression” for women. 

Sound familiar? Yeah, sounds a lot like the same language makeup companies are using now. 

Corporations don’t care about women’s rights. They don’t care about feminism or “empowerment”. They only care about profits. If they can find a way to sell something to you, they will. 

youtube

From the incomparable Ursula K. Le Guin’s amazing speech at the National Book Awards on Nov. 19, 2014:

“Right now, I think we need writers who know the difference between the production of a market commodity and the practice of an art. Developing written material to suit sales strategies in order to maximize corporate profit and advertising revenue is not quite the same thing as responsible book publishing or authorship. (Thank you, brave applauders.)

"Yet I see sales departments given control over editorial; I see my own publishers in a silly panic of ignorance and greed, charging public libraries for an ebook six or seven times more than they charge customers. We just saw a profiteer try to punish a publisher for disobedience and writers threatened by corporate fatwa, and I see a lot of us, the producers who write the books, and make the books, accepting this. Letting commodity profiteers sell us like deodorant, and tell us what to publish and what to write. (Well, I love you too, darling.)

"Books, you know, they’re not just commodities. The profit motive often is in conflict with the aims of art. We live in capitalism. Its power seems inescapable. So did the divine right of kings. Any human power can be resisted and changed by human beings. Resistance and change often begin in art, and very often in our art—the art of words.”

Right now, I think we need writers who know the difference between the production of a market commodity and the practice of an art. Developing written material to suit sales strategies in order to maximize corporate profit and advertising revenue is not quite the same thing as responsible book publishing or authorship…. The profit motive often is in conflict with the aims of art. We live in capitalism. Its power seems inescapable. So did the divine right of kings. Any human power can be resisted and changed by human beings. Resistance and change often begin in art, and very often in our art—the art of words…. I have had a long career and a good one. In good company. Now here, at the end of it, I really don’t want to watch American literature get sold down the river… The name of our beautiful reward is not profit. It’s name is freedom.
—  Ursula K. Le Guin, National Book Awards speech

The full transcript of Ursula Le Guin’s excellent speech at the National Book Awards:

Thank you Neil, and to the givers of this beautiful reward, my thanks from the heart. My family, my agent, editors, know that my being here is their doing as well as mine, and that the beautiful reward is theirs as much as mine. And I rejoice at accepting it for, and sharing it with, all the writers who were excluded from literature for so long, my fellow authors of fantasy and science fiction—writers of the imagination, who for the last 50 years watched the beautiful rewards go to the so-called realists.

I think hard times are coming when we will be wanting the voices of writers who can see alternatives to how we live now and can see through our fear-stricken society and its obsessive technologies to other ways of being, and even imagine some real grounds for hope. We will need writers who can remember freedom. Poets, visionaries—the realists of a larger reality.

Right now, I think we need writers who know the difference between the production of a market commodity and the practice of an art. Developing written material to suit sales strategies in order to maximize corporate profit and advertising revenue is not quite the same thing as responsible book publishing or authorship. (Thank you, brave applauders.)

Yet I see sales departments given control over editorial; I see my own publishers in a silly panic of ignorance and greed, charging public libraries for an ebook six or seven times more than they charge customers. We just saw a profiteer try to punish a publisher for disobedience and writers threatened by corporate fatwa, and I see a lot of us, the producers who write the books, and make the books, accepting this. Letting commodity profiteers sell us like deodorant, and tell us what to publish and what to write. (Well, I love you too, darling.)

Books, you know, they’re not just commodities. The profit motive often is in conflict with the aims of art. We live in capitalism. Its power seems inescapable. So did the divine right of kings. Any human power can be resisted and changed by human beings. Resistance and change often begin in art, and very often in our art—the art of words.

I have had a long career and a good one. In good company. Now here, at the end of it, I really don’t want to watch American literature get sold down the river. We who live by writing and publishing want—and should demand—our fair share of the proceeds. But the name of our beautiful reward is not profit. It’s name is freedom.

Thank you.