Make Some Pocket Extenders for Your Pants

So I don’t know about you, but I’m often frustrated by the ridiculous smallness of girls’ pockets. At a bare minimum, I need to be able to shove my cellphone in there - come on, pants companies! So what I started doing was making myself pocket extenders. I’ve done this several times, for pants and shorts. It’s great.

I just got this pair of jeans, so I thought I’d show you how to do it. I kind of feel like it just hasn’t occurred to some of you that this is an option, so maybe now it will. All you need is your pants, some fabric (I just took a random piece from a scrap bin), a needle, and some thread (thread doesn’t even need to match the fabric since literally no one will see it).

See? Ridiculous. Like, half a cellphone, or only 2.5″. Useless.

 So turn those inside out to expose the pockets.

Figure out how big you want your pockets to actually be. I kinda go by whatever looks like might be right. I didn’t really measure them. Fold the fabric in half, so you have a pocket, and then fold it in half again so you can have two equal ones.

Try to get the edges to line up enough, pin it in place, then sew up the sides! Are your stitches crazy uneven and wonky looking? Doesn’t matter; nobody’s going to see it. These are in the inside of your pants. The only thing that matters is that it holds up. So I double-did the corners, since those tend to get the most stress.

Cut open the bottom of the existing pockets.

Pin it in place, then sew around, joining the new pocket to the old pocket. I did this by keeping my hand on the inside, so I wouldn’t accidentally sew through the other side. Again, I reinforced the corners, and didn’t worry about what it actually looks like. Then I turned it in side out to make sure the inside was all joined properly.

Yay all done! And the pockets are so much bigger now!

Whaaaat I can fit my entire phone and entire hand and probably something else now, are girls’ pockets even allowed to do that?! Heck yeah they are.

How-To: Sensing Energy

A lot of the newbies I’ve talked to are so hung up on seeing energy. They have  had results, just not results they could see with their eyes. I’d say that 95% of the time , I perceive energy either by feeling it or by using my “6th sense”. Some individuals with the natural talent of seeing auras may be able to pick up visuals easier than others.

The first step to perceiving energy, is to learn to feel it. After you start feeling it, you develop your 6th sense naturally and, in time, that’s all you’ll use.  You just gotta open yourself up and be open to it. Try visualizing energy beaming into parts of your body and see if you can feel something there. This stuff gets easier, you just have to trust yourself and practice.

Here are some ways we use to describe how these energies feel to us that might help you increase your awareness of them. They may be sensed with the hand or all over the body

  • Buzzing or tingling, like when your leg is asleep.
  • Prickly, like static electricity.
  • A feeling of heat without a heat source. (Usually denotes a LOT of energy moving.)
  • A feeling of cold without a physical source.
  • A sense of a rising or falling pitch without any audible sound.
  • A feeling of something flowing through you like wind or a stream or current of warm water.
  • A feeling like a wave passing through you.
  • A sense that some other Being, like an angel or ghost has stepped inside of you (“incorporation”)
  • Pressure or a pushing sensation with nothing touching you.
  • A pulsing sensation that is not in time with your heartbeat. (Usually a balancing “Healing Pulse”.)
  • A sensation of bubbles rising like carbonated water or Alka-Seltzer.
  • A “clanging” sensation like striking a piece of metal held in your hand with a hammer.
  • A spinning or whirling sensation.
  • A fluttering or shimmering sensation.
  • A sensation like a change in altitude or barometric pressure.
  • A sense of lightness that wasn’t present before.
  • A sense of expansion in some way.
  • A shift in consciousness like meditation or falling asleep.
  • A sudden sigh or yawn. (Denotes that you are getting relieved of something by what you came into contact with.) 
I don’t want to look like anyone else.

I want to look like a stronger me.

I want to look like a faster me.

I want to look like a more confident me.

I want to look like the happiest version of myself.

I don’t want another person’s body. I don’t want their hair. I don’t want their smile. I don’t want their boobs, or butt, or anything. I simply want to look like the best version of myself. 

How to Practice Effectively

Mastering any physical skill, be it performing a pirouette, playing an instrument, or throwing a baseball, takes practice. Practice is the repetition of an action with the goal of improvement, and it helps us perform with more ease, speed, and confidence. 

There are many theories that attempt to quantify the number of hours, days, and even years of practice that it takes to master a skill. While we don’t yet have a magic number, we do know that mastery isn’t simply about the amount of hours of practice. It’s also the quality and effectiveness of that practice. Effective practice is consistent, intensely focused, and targets content or weaknesses that lie at the edge of one’s current abilities. So if effective practice is the key, how can we get the most out of our practice time? 

Below are 4 tips for practicing better for just about anything!

1. Focus on the task at hand. Minimize potential distractions by turning off the computer or TV and putting your cell phone on airplane mode. In one study, researchers observed 260 students studying. On average, those students were able to stay on task for only six minutes at a time. Laptops, smartphones, and particularly Facebook were the root of most distractions. 

2. Start out slowly or in slow-motion. Coordination is built with repetitions, whether correct or incorrect. If you gradually increase the speed of the quality repetitons, you have a better chance of doing them correctly. 

3. Next, frequent repetitions with allotted breaks are common practice habits of elite performers. Studies have shown that many top athletes, musicians, and dancers spend 50-60 hours per week on activities related to their craft. Many divide their time used for effective practice into multiple daily practice sessions of limited duration. 

4. Finally, practice in your brain in vivid detail. It’s a bit surprising, but a number of studies suggest that once a physical motion has been established, it can be reinforced just by imagining it. In one study, 144 basketball players were divided into two groups. Group A physically practiced one-handed free throws while Group B only mentally practiced them. When they were tested at the end of the two week experiment, the intermediate and experienced players in both groups had improved by nearly the same amount. 

As scientists get closer to unraveling the secrets of our brains, our understanding of effective practice will only improve. In the meantime, effective practice is the best way we have of pushing our individual limits, achieving new heights, and maximizing our potential.

From the TED-Ed Lesson How to practice effectively…for just about anything - Annie Bosler and Don Greene

Animation by Martina Meštrović

Redraw of this picture I did awhile ago of how I pictured a dress Marinette wore in @pozolegirl s fic Stray Chat (if you haven’t read it please do yourself a favour and go read it!! One of the best fics I’ve read still to this day!!) Anyways I kind of messed her face and hair up but I figured I’d post it anyways :P

Never let anybody else tell you what progress is.
You are the only one who knows
where you’ve been and how far you’ve come.
You are the only one who knows
what you were up against.
You are the only one who can honestly tell yourself
whether or not you’re getting better.
So, my love,
if you walk out of that presentation thinking you killed it,
and get the scoresheet back to find out you
“Need more confidence”
or “weren’t loud enough”
or whatever else it is you struggle with,
I urge you to throw that feedback to the wind.
The person who gave you that score
doesn’t know your life story.
They weren’t there for the time in eighth grade
when you had a panic attack in english
before having to read your writing to the class.
They didn’t watch your ninth grade class presentation
during which your hands shook so much you
dropped your notecards on the way back to your seat.
All they know about you is what they saw that one time.
They scored you off of what they believe is good,
but they haven’t seen how much better you’ve gotten.
Just because you aren’t up to their standards
doesn’t mean you didn’t just crush your own.
You are getting better.
You are getting better,
and just because others can’t see that
doesn’t mean it isn’t true.
—  some advice //c.r.h.