Anniversary flash message
Today we remember the birthday of a female artist who made a courageous statement back in 1913. She painted this self portrait with a nude, which still very much was a taboo in those days. The female nude had always been a male subject and women were denied access to nude models.
Dame Laura Knight was born 4 August 1877. 

Dame Laura Knight, Dame Laura Knight with model, Ella Louise Naper (‘Self Portrait’), 1913. Oil on canvas, 152,4 x 127,6 cm. National Portrait Gallery, London

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The Impressionist Landscape Painting of Graham Gercken

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Graham Gercken–Award Winning Australian Artist

Graham was born in Queensland Australia 1960 than lived in Penrith from 1961 to 1983
Predominantly self taught he chose oil paints as his medium and painted wet into wet, which is the style of the impressionist artists and lends itself best for outdoor painting like those of the AustralianHeidelberg school of artists. artsaus

                                                     

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Camille Pissarro - Avenue de l'Opera (1898)

Dutch-French painter Camille Pissarro is known as the “Dean of the Impressionists.” Heavily influenced by time, illusion, and the streets of Paris, Pissarro, as well as many other Impressionist artists, including Claude Monet are known to obsessively reproduce several works of the same landscape. To distinguish the multiple productions, they are composed during different weather or time conditions. The concept of time was a pivotal tool and theme in the Impressionist Era. By capturing the difference in shadow and color throughout the day or seasons the scenery and the mood of the location drastically changes. 

Berthe Morisot’s family (8)
In the countryside
In 1863, the Morisots rented a country house to spend the summer. That gave Berthe and Edma ample opportunity to go out in the countryside and paint. Both sisters worked with the landscape painter Oudinot and met Daubigny who was living in Auvers.
Berthe Morisot destroyed most of her early work, but this piece survived. It was well received at the official Salon of 1864. Magazines wrote about “two sisters who make progress with patience and intelligence in their study paying tribute to M. Corot” and “two girls that the Salon revealed to us and at whom the old nature seems to smile at from their debut in the art scene”.

Berthe Morisot, Vieux chemin à Auvers (An old Road at Auvers), 1863. Oil on canvas, 45 x 31 cm. Private collection