impression sunrise (impression soleil levant) 1873

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Monet on the Run - 22. A few words about Eugène Boudin
Even though Boudin took part in the first Impressionist Exhibition in 1874, he never felt like an innovator or a radical. And he was right, but don’t these later studies of his match remarkably well with Monet’s ‘Impression, Sunrise’?
Monet’s iconic painting shocked the visitors of that same first exhibition, was laughed away by the press, but eventually gave its name to the impressionist movement. 

Eugène Boudin, Études de ciel, c. 1888 - 1895. Musée d’Art Moderne André Malraux, Le Havre, France
Claude Monet, Impression, soleil levant (Impression, Sunrise), 1873. Oil on canvas, 48 x 63 cm. Musée Marmottan Monet, Paris

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Monet on the Run - 43. Whistlered?
James McNeill Whistler may very well have frequented the circle of refugee French artists in London. After all, his name figured on Daubigny’s list with London contacts. Although there’s no hard evidence that he met Monet, it is tempting to think that they did meet or that Monet at least saw one or two of Whistler’s Nocturnes, on which he was working while he was in London. Perhaps Monet remembered them, when he painted his famous ‘Impression. Sunrise’, two years later.
Just compare.

James McNeill Whistler,
- Nocturne in Blue and Silver, Chelsea, 1871. Oil on wood, 50.2 x 60.8 cm. Tate Britain, London
- Symphony in Grey, Early Morning, Thames, c 1871. Oil on canvas, 45.7 x 67.5 cm. Freer Gallery of Art, Washington DC
- Nocturne, Blue and Silver, Cremorne Lights, 1872. Oil on canvas, 50.2 x 74.3 cm. Tate Britain, London

Claude Monet, Impression, soleil levant (Impression, Sunrise), 1873. Oil on canvas, 48 x 63 cm. Musée Marmottan Monet, Paris