impossibility of reason

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Fall Out Boy Creations Challenge  |  s0fthearts
Theme: Favorite Song

B o y c o t t   l o v e
Detox just to retox

“what?”

I like the idea of ???% signing even more than originally planned, i think i’m going to do more!

嬉しい 大丈夫 | ごめんなさい

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           PAY                                             YOUR                                       DUES

Quand une chanson vous fait pleurer, mais que vous n'avez plus envie de pleurer, vous cessez de l'écouter.
Mais échapper à soi-même, c'est impossible. On ne peut pas décider de ne plus se voir. De couper le son à l'intérieur de sa tête.
—  Jay Asher

anonymous asked:

Whats your opinion on the headcanon that bakugou is hard of hearing because of how loud his explosions are? If you dont mind my asking

I think I answered this q on this blog already? Maybe? But anyway, I don’t exactly mind it, but I can’t say I share the headcanon myself - for one, because I’m of the opinion that their bodies are built to withstand a safe use of their quirks (a bit like you can’t break a leg by simply walking, you know), so in general I’m not a fan of headcanons that include damages caused by simply doing what their bodies were born to do? 

But also because generally, even under the assumption that his body isn’t made to hold up with his explosions, isn’t it awfully convenient how only his ears take damage in these scenarios? What about his eyes? How come he can still see with no problems even with the continuous exposure to the explosions’ light? How about his hair? How come he can stand so close to fire without it ever being damaged by it? His palms have thicker skin and we know that thanks to his UA file, but what about the rest of his body? How come he can stand smack in the middle of an Howitzer Impact without getting even slightly burnt? When you say “only his ears aren’t made to withstand his explosions” what you’re telling me is that his whole body is tailord to deal with his quirk but his ears, and that just feels unrealistic to me - by which I mean, when this is the scenario we’re talking about, you can’t give the fault of the damage to Bakugou’s quirk. It’s a problem his body has, not a natural consequence of having that sort of quirk. And imho with those premises you sort of end up with a different kind of story, you’re supposed to write it differently - that’s what I think, at least

Anon said: Maybe the reason Baku raises his voice so often is because he can’t hear very well, which isn’t due to his explosions, rather, he was born with bad hearing to protect him from taking damage by them.. and then his other senses are sharper to even it out, and his body can even subconsciously notice air vibrations, resulting in really fast reflexes.

Ah, this is also another reason why I’m not a huge fan of the headcanon - don’t get me wrong! If you like it then go on, I’m not trying to stop anyone from enjoying ideas and possibilities!! But personally I like Bakugou not having any reason to be loud-mouthed and rude, that’s just his personality and how the environment he grew up in made him, and lately I’ve seen the hc used to justify his behaviour more than I like? Bakugou being an asshole is just who he is, and I love it! I love that his life made him like that and I love that he’s working hard to fix that flaw, giving him an external reason, something he has no control over, to justify his personality changes the core of his character too much, and that’s not something I’d ever want to do tbh

And it’s also cool to think that he was somewhat genetically engineered to be better in a fight to compensate for a lack of earing (though again, why only his ears and not his eyes or his sense of tact too), but that goes to cut on all the hard work he put in becoming as good as he is, right? If that’s what you like than who am I to stop you! But Bakugou’s hardworking nature is one of the things I love about him, I don’t really feel like taking away from him all the effort and work he put through the years in becoming as good as he is now

Keep reading

Reasons why self dx is good from the pov of a professional
  1. Therapists/Specialists are not omnipotent. There are a lot of different mental disorders and disabilities that you could literally study for five years and still don’t know everything about. If you don’t know enough about a condition to see its signs in a person (which many therapists actually don’t because the only thing they really know about illnesses that are less common are the DSM/ICD criteria for it. However, these criteria are not enough for a diagnosis and sometimes even too vague to pick up the signs for an illness in a person. I honestly don’t want to know how many people are misdiagnosed with a common mental condition but actually have a rare one that’s just pretty similar to the common one) than you gonna miss a lot as a therapist. And many therapist do miss a lot.
  2. Therapists are biased. Therapists are only people. Just like normal people, they are not immune against stereotypes and prejudices. Because specialists hardly ever teach you at uni but only in special courses that you have to take in order to specialize as well, we actually learn a lot of stereotypes and prejudices because the people teaching us interpret the information they have in a wrong way because they don’t know more about it. A person who is currently studying to become a therapist needs to be aware of that and do their own research in order to get useful information, however most aren’t even aware of how wrong the things that they’re learning are because they have, like everyone else, the bias to trust people like professors that they actually know a 100% what they’re talking about (even though many actually ADMIT that they don’t know anything about it). This is another bias that’s pretty common in people, widely researched and again not something therapists and specialists are immune to.
    If you, for example, know that autism isn’t common in girls, then you won’t look for it  in girls and are likely to oversee the signs because you think that autism is too rare in girls. And additionally, to recognize autism in girls, a specialist needs to be aware that the symptoms show differently in afab and amab people which again, many “specialists” don’t because that’s not taught in class. You need to teach things like that to yourself or actually specialize on the condition.
  3. Literally every disorder that is known today is still being researched. And probably will not even exist like this in a few years anymore because the research might show that some symptoms are more important than those on the DSM V/ICD 10 that we have right now or they’ll maybe even find out that something that they diagnosed as one condition is actually two conditions (for example, for decades schizoid personality disorder was diagnosed as autism because both conditions create similar symptoms in many points. However, research showed that they differ in very important points and are actually two different conditions. I don’t even want to know how many people were misdiagnosed and mistreated because of that.)
  4. Therapists only have a limited view on their clients. They can’t look inside your head, they can only try to form an image of them by doing a metaphorical puzzle - they  have to look for the small things, the signs and symptoms and put the together in a way that actually makes sense and matches the symptoms of a disorder. If you don’t tell them everything - which you won’t (frankly because you don’t even remember everything when talking to your therapist or because you view some information as useless and don’t give it to your therapist that would actually be vital for the right diagnosis), - you can be sure that there will always be holes in your diagnosis. There will always be something that your therapist won’t take into account. That doesn’t mean that every diagnosis by a professional is wrong, therapists are often right. However, you know yourself better than anyone else. If you realize that you do/feel something that your therapist oversaw, than you are probably right and it might be worth digging into (even though I would advice talking about it with your therapist or someone else who knows you well enough to form an oppinion about it).
  5. Not everyone has access to a mental health specialist. (I should repeat this thirty times so that everyone gets it). Depending on where you life, you might not have enough money to afford a therapy. You might loose your complete health insurance or some of it if you go to a therapist more than three times, even if you’re not diagnosed with a condition (it’s like that in my homecountry). Getting diagnosed or attending a therapist literally makes it easier for people to instutionalize you against your will because speaking up against it gets interpreted as a person “not having insight in their own condition" by neurotypicals (even though they might have last beeen in treatment a deade ago… They don’t care, they say that the said person is insane because they say that they need treatment and when they deny it, it just prooves their point) [you would not believe how many therapists I already met who actually think like this].
    Our society is still hugely biased against mentally ill people. Getting a diagnosis can be expensive or impossible for other reasons. Not in every country you can attend a therapist without getting an official diagnosis (some people might do “off record”-diagnoisis, meaning that they confirm that you have a certain condition but don’t give you a diagnostic paper because they know how this can affect you. However, this highly depends on how the therapist is paid - if they only receive payment for diagnosed conditions, then they have no choice but diagnose you).
  6. Self-dx can be just as accurate and good as professional dx. There are a lot of free ressources all around the internet, libraries and so on that are actually written for professionals. Reading and applying these things is what maks a professional a professional. It’s exactly how you turn into a professional - your professors hand you the ressources, the rest is your own job. It doesn’t make much of a difference if you read all the books that you need for yourself or if you attend courses at college/university. The only difference is that professionals know a lot about other areas of human behavior and thus are better at evaluating how strongly it differs from normal behavior and in which points a person exactly differs. That doesn’t really have a big impact on the diagnostic process though, it’s just important for a general understanding of this weird species we call homo sapiens. If you feel better about it, you can read those ressources, too, but I wouldn’t deem it nesscessary.
  7. Self-dx actually helps improvement. If a person is not able to consult a specialist, it doesn’t really do any good for them to sit around and wait until they have the oportunity to do so (if that ever happens, which is again not the case for everyone). Because mental illnesses/conditions are just like physical ones - if you don’t treat them, they get worse and worse and worse. Mental health issues lead to different neurons firing in the brain, strengthening different synaptic patterns and thus patterns of thinking and behaving. The longer a person uses their synaptic connections, the more intense they become while others that aren’t use weaken. Not intervening means not stopping this process. And depending on how long a person has been following some of those patterns, they might take twice the time to “rewire” themselves or might even be unable to do so ever.
    It is important to treat mental illnesses as soon as possible in order to prevent further damage. Being against self-dx is being against people who don’t have a possibility to get help helping themselves which is frankly the only thing that might save them or give them the chance to live their life how they want to. Knowing about what illness you have is important in order to know how to cope with what. Sometimes it’s even essential to know what you need to cope with in the first place (e.g. my autism diagnosis… I was born autistic and didn’t know that I was autistic. The first thing I had to learn is what exactly makes me different from other people which I couldn’t know because I didn’t even know that I was different. I didn’t know what exactly made me feel bad, what stressed me out, and so on. But finally having a diagnosis, finally knowing what I’m dealing with helped me improve my life a whole damn lot.) 
  8. Self-dx is not a short process. I’ve always known that I wasn’t neurotypical, that’s for sure. However, it took me years to finally figure out which conditions I actually have and which are just results of other conditions I had. In order to do that, I needed to research everything that was somehow related to anything that I could be affected by. Self-dx takes time and extensive screening of information because, guess what, mis-self-diagnosing is just as unhelpful as professional mis-diagnosing. Only that it’s much easier to figure out if you’ve wrongly misdiagnosed yourself and went about it the wrong way than actually getting a specialist to admit that they misdiagnosed you (because therapists actually like to forget that they’re not omnipotent themselves).
  9. No one actually thinks that self-dx should replace professional-dx. Nobody actually wants to deny that professional diagnosis are valid by self-dxing. They don’t want to make fun of a disorder or “try to be edgy by having a mental condition”. Just like od-people don’t have the condition to be cool or edgy. The only difference is that od-people have a sheeet of paper that a human signed and that is saying “you have this disorder, congratulations, here is why I know”.
  10. Neurodivergent people actually know that they are neurodivergent! Everyone who has been diagnosed with anything later in life that they actually had since they were little should understand that not the diagnosis makes you have a condition but that actually having a condition gets you your diagnosis. Everyone remembers signs and symptoms they showed prior to their diagnosis. And it’s the same for self-dx people. Only because they didn’t have the chance to get a professional to check their claim, it doesn’t mean that they never noticed that they are mentally ill or in which ways they are. Neurodivergent people are not dumb. They actually know that they’re not neurotypical. So of course they start to look for an explanation, for a label in order to understand what they’re dealing with! And who are you to decide if the label they picked is right or wrong? You don’t know them. And even if it’s wrong… than they will definitely notice and not stick with it becaue “this condition is so much cooler than the one I actually have omg like autism is far more edgy than bpd”. Nobody who seriously self-diagnosed would say anything like that because that’s not the resaon you put so much effort in your self-diagnosis!! It’s because you want to know what’s going on with you and how to cope with it.
    (Being against self dx is actually further pushing the narrative that neurodivergent people don’t know that they aren’t neurotypical which is frankly such a harmful and toxic rethoric that is used against everyone who says that they’re mentally ill [because how bad can it be if you notice, right?] and those who have made enough progress that they wouldn’t consider themselves ill anymore [e.g. instutionalization, as mentioned above]. What is even worse about the rethoric is that in order to get diagnosed [and to diagnose yourself], you have to actually notice how the condition influences your quality of life. If it doesn’t have any impact on that, then you aren’t considered mentally ill. You probably all see now how this is actually the opposite of the rethoric that many people still push and believe in)


Honestly, I could probably continue this list forever, but I’ll stop now. If you feel like you have anything to add, just do it! It’s important to speak out for our self dx friends.