importance of learning from the past

  • You will show them paintings by
    Adolf Kaufmann, and they will ask
    you about the rows of plastic sheep.

    In overwhelming procession, railroad
    cars shamble along the finite cadence
    of a primative, joyless perspective -
    two lofty abstractions turned mutable
    in the agency of late September heat.
    Here, we do not deign to observe
    these anemic relics, to seek, to know,
    to digest the notion that cancels out
    our self-importance. Some will trace
    the vein of endangered silence, pry
    the spectre-like prophecy from
    abandoned woods. Sorrows will
    expire within us, drip like living wax,
    a thick tapestry of absent study. Lives
    complete with homes and worried
    looks for minding dwell here. Elevation
    doesn’t factor into jaunty little themes,
    the platitudes of vapid truths. The
    sum of everything we are comes
    down to the reality intrinsically set. I
    breathe to unravel the past, to learn,
    to pay the toll of creating, no,
    refining this existence, this caustic
    little experiment.
Malayalam Lesson 9 - Past tense

It feels like a long time since we covered critical grammar point, so today we are going to learn how to talk and write in past tense. The sentence structure is very much similar to present tense, so reviewing it helps a lot. There are two main ways to express past tense simple past and past continuous.

The first thing we’ll cover is Simple Past tense, which is using conjugated verbs in a sentence, so learning how to conjugate verbs into past tense is important. There isn’t a pattern necessarily but rest assured there are only two main ending: ഇ and ഉ (the symbols of course because vowels cannot be used in the middle or at the end), the rest depends upon the flow the original word and what consonant it ends with.

Here are some common verbs, you’ll recognize them from previous lessons. How do you know which ending to use? For now, you’ll have to memorize it but soon you’ll be able to tell if something just “sounds right”

പോവുക (to go) - പോയി (went, gone, left)
പാടുക (to sing) - പാടി  (sang)
ഓടുക (to run) - ഓടി (ran)
എഴുതുക (write) - എഴുതി (wrote)
വാങ്ങുക (buy) - വാങ്ങി (bought)
കിട്ടുക (get/receive)- കിട്ടി (got/received)

കിടക്കും (lie) - കിടന്നു (laid, lay)
ഇരിക്കുക (sit) - ഇരുന്നു (sat)
വരുക (come) - വന്നു (came)
നടക്കുക (walk) - നടന്നു (walked)
പറയുക (say) - പറഞ്ഞു (said)
കുടിക്കുക (drink) - കുടിച്ചു (drank, drunk)
സംസാരിക്കുക (speak/talk) - സംസാരിച്ചു (spoke/talked)
ചെയ്യുക (do) - ചെയതു (done)
കേൾക്കുക (listen) - കേട്ടു (listened)
കൊടുക്കുക (give) - കൊടുത്തു (gave)

Next is the equivalent of Past Continuous in English. The word to use and add to the verbs is ആയിരുന്നു (was), the past tense of ആണ് (is) (lesson 2 & lesson 3).

In this case the verbs are left in their infinitive form and ആയിരുന്നു is added to it, you can write them separately especially as a beginner but the common way to write it is to combine both

Infinitive + ആയിരുന്നു

പോവുക + ആയിരുന്നു = പോവുകയായിരുന്നു (combo form)

As mentioned before യ is like a glue and it helps smooth everything out in writing and speaking.

ഞാൻ നടക്കുകയായിരുന്നു - I was walking
അവർ വരുകയായിരുന്നു - They were coming

Try translating these:
Simple Past
I ate an apple.
My friend ran.
Your sister gave the book.

Past Continuous
He was singing
My mother was walking
They were talking

PSA
From next week onward we’ll begin an exercise or activity series, in which we’ll review all the grammar points learned so far. Please look forward to it!

y’know, now that homestuck is relevant again, i think we as a fandom can really take things we’ve learned in the past few years and put them to use in the context of old issues from back in the day. i think there’s a lot of important concepts and ideas that come from newer fandoms that can solve age-old debates about aspects of homestuck.

what i’m saying here is that john egbert’s voice definitely sounds like griffin mcelroy

you don’t stop
loving someone
just because
you don’t talk
to each other
anymore.

you don’t start
hating someone
just because
things got tough
or wasn’t all
sunshine and
butterflies
the whole time.

sometimes
things work out,
sometimes
they don’t,

sometimes shit
just happens,
and that’s okay.

love is really,
fucking complicated
guys.
but go with it
when you find it
anyways.

you might
get lucky
or you might not,
but either way
you can say you
tried and learned.

and that’s
important
too.

—  trying to learn from what happened (6/21/17), thekaijusleeps

if things don’t go your way, keep fighting. keep doing. it’s okay to be sad for a while, but it’s so important to get up again and analyse what went wrong, set up a new plan, and continue working towards your goals. regretting the past isn’t going to help you in the present, there’s nothing you can do now except learn from your mistakes and fight for your dreams.

anonymous asked:

Any advice on how to write a heist story something like oceans Eleven?

Well, you can start by watching Ocean’s Eleven, and Ocean’s Eleven, and then Leverage, and then Burn Notice, and then The A-Team, and then Mission: Impossible, and then all the other heist stories like The Italian Job or Heat. Watch, read, uncover as many stories about criminals as you can from fiction to nonfiction to reading security analyst blogs. Read the spy memoirs, the thief memoirs, the fake ones and the real ones. Check out magicians, hypnotists, card tricks, and sleight of hand. Watch the making ofs and director’s commentaries looking for clues behind the thought process of these stories. The hows and the whys as you look into the research they did. Burn Notice, for example, is famous for using stunt props and technological rigs that work in real life. Like using cell phones to create cheap bugs on the go.

The worlds of criminal fiction and spy fiction rely on being able to present (or convincingly fake) a world which feels real. A heist is all about exploitation. So, you need a world with security structures to exploit. You’ve got to know how things work before you can craft a way to break them. Social engineering, hacking, and every other criminal skill is about breaking the systems in place. So, you’ve got to get a baseline for how law enforcement and security analysts work. What security systems are set up to look like. The ways we go about discouraging thieves. Better yet how people behave. Real, honest to god human behavior.

So, you know, pick somewhere in order to start your research. Get an idea of what you want write about stealing, then learn everything about the object, the museum, the city, the country, and its customs as you can.

If you’re setting a heist in a futuristic or fantasy setting then luck you, you get to make all of it up.

Learning the plot structure and conventions of the heist genre is the first step. This means watching lots and lots of heist movies, shows, and reading books. Over time, as you become better at critical analysis, you’ll begin to see specific story structures and character archetypes emerge.

The Heist Story is a genre. Like every other genre, it comes with its own structure, cliches, archetypes, plots, and genre conventions which necessitate the narrative. The better grasp you have of those, the better you’ll be at writing a heist.

For example, a heist story like Ocean’s Eleven relies on a collection of thieves rather than a single individual. The character types are as follows:

The Pointman - Your planner, strategist, team leader, and the Jack of All Trades. Can also be called the Mastermind. They’re the one who can take the place of anyone on the team should they fall through. They’re not as good as a specialist, but they’re very flexible. Narratively, he plans the cons and subs in where he’s needed.

The Faceman - Your experienced Grifter, here for all your social engineering needs. These guys talk their way in.

The Infiltrator - Your cat burglar or break-in artist. Basically, the conventional genre thief. Your Parker, Catwoman, Sam Fisher, or Solid Snake. The stealth bastards, they’re all about silent in, out, and playing acrobatic games with the lasers.

The Hacker - The electronics and demolitions specialist. Usually this is the guy in the van overseeing stuff remotely. Your Eye in the Sky. Their skill set can be split up and swapped around as necessary.

The Muscle - The one who is good at fighting. They’re combat focused characters, usually with mercenary and special forces backgrounds. Though, that’s optional.

The Wheelman - The one who handles the getaway. They’re your often overlooked transport specialists. It’s not just that they can drive, they’re skilled at getting lots of people around, figuring out how to move your valuables, and exiting hostile cities or countries undetected. They get the team in and they get them out.

For an example of these archetypes, I’m going to use Leverage. Nathan Ford, The Pointman (technically, he’s written like a Faceman). Sophie Devereaux , The Faceman. Parker, the Infiltrator. Hardison, the Hacker. Eliot, the Muscle. They all take turns being the Wheelman.

Other examples like Burn Notice: Michael Westen, the Pointman. Sam Axe, the Faceman. Fiona, the Muscle. They all take turns with explosives, Michael will invariably take all the roles during the course of the show.

Ocean’s Eleven has multiple variants of these archetypes, all broken down and mixed up.

You can mix and match these qualities into different individuals or break them apart like in Ocean’s Eleven, and more than one character can fill more than one role, but that’s the basic breakdown. For example, your hacker doesn’t need to be a guy in a van overlooking the whole security grid. One guy or girl with a cell phone can sit in the lobby of a building with an unsecured wireless network and crack the security. Welcome to the 21st century. The skills don’t necessarily need to take the specific expected shape.

What you do need is the basic breakdown:  You need someone to plan the con, you need someone to be your face or grifter, you need someone to break in, you need someone to watch the security/electronics, you need muscle to back you up, and someone’s got to cover the getaway.

These shift depending on your plan, but this is the expected lineup for a heist narrative. The first step of a heist narrative is not the plan because we don’t have one yet. We’ve got an idea. Pick your target. Maybe it’s a famous painting. Maybe it’s a casino. Maybe it’s a rare artifact from a private investor’s collection loaned to a museum for a short period of time. Maybe it’s art stolen by the Nazis during WWII. Whatever it is, figure it out.

The next step is simple. If you want the thing, you’ve got to find a way to get it. This is a big job, your standard thief won’t be able to pull it off alone. So, you gotta go recruiting. Get your team together. Make sure to establish the goals of the different members for joining. Who they are. Their pedigree. One might be an old flame or an old enemy. This is where we lay out some character driven subplots.

When everyone’s together, we’ve got to lay out the plan. Before we have a plan though, we need to establish where the object is and the issues in getting it. Why this has never been done before. So, what are the challenges? Invariably, an object worth a great deal of money will have a lot of security protecting it. Figure out what that security is, who the item belongs to, what sort of retribution do the thieves face beyond what they might expect. Lasers, pressure plates, cameras, security, other career criminals, mob bosses, the rich and powerful, whatever.

After that: How do you get it? Then you’ve got to plan the con, while taking everything into account.

Then, We prep the Con. There will be steps to take before the con can be put into place, your characters taking their positions in plain sight. Stealing whatever pieces you need to make it work. Casing the joint. Etc.

Then: Run the Con. This is the part with the actual stealing. Better known as the first attempt. Things go well, there may be a few mistakes, but things are going well and then we…

Encounter Resistance. While running the con, something goes wrong, pieces fall apart, the thieves come close to success but the object gets moved and they suddenly need a new plan. New information may pop up, it may be one of your artists was running a con of their own separate from the rest. If there’s a double cross in the works then this may be when and where it lands.

We’re ready now, so it’s time hit up: Steal the Thing, Round Two. Your characters put their new plan into play and get about thieving the object of their desire.

Lastly: The Get Away. This is the part where your thieves make for the hills with their stolen treasure. This can be short or long depending on the kind of story you’re telling and other double crosses may occur here. It could be the end of the story or the beginning of a new heist.

Heist stories are like mystery novels. They’re all about sleight of hand and misdirection. You’ve got to keep just enough information on the table to keep your audience on the hook, and just enough information off the table to surprise them later on the twist. Yet, when they go back to re-read the novel again, they’ll find the answer was there all along. They just didn’t see it coming.

If anything, learning how to write a well-done heist or a mystery or any kind of novel in this genre will teach you a lot about how to manage your foreshadowing and create superb plot twists. Like any good con, you need to lay out all the conflicting pieces where people can see them, let them draw their own conclusions, withhold the critical context, and then hit them with the whammy.

Like lots of audiences, new writers (and even some old ones) can get distracted by the shock and awe. They see they’re impressed by the conclusion, not the lay-up. If you want to write any kind of fiction, you need to learn to see past the curtain and pay attention to the critical pieces leading into an important moment rather than the moment itself.

Good writing isn’t modular, you can’t just strip out pieces and run with them because you’ll end up missing the crucial, sometimes innocuous pieces that ensured the scene worked. Like the Victorian Hand Touch, every moment between the two leads and most of their scenes with secondary players are working for that singular instance of eventual, gleeful catharsis.

If you’ve got a plot twist coming in your novel, every sentence from the second you start writing is working towards it. You start laying out your pieces, funneling in your tricks, and playing with misdirection. You may have multiple twists, to cover yourself, divert your audience, congratulate them for successfully guessing your ploy, and reassure their initial suspicions before catching them again on the upswing.

The clever writer is as much a con artist as their characters. The only difference is the target of their con is their audience. The tricks in their bag are narrative ones, and they work with the understanding that it doesn’t matter if someone guesses the end so long as they’re entertained by the journey. A great story stays entertaining long after the audience has figured out all the twists.

So, don’t get caught up in Red Herrings and frightened about not being able to outsmart other people. Tell a good story with conviction and heart about a bunch of crooks out to steal their heart’s desire.

That’s all there is to it.

-Michi

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Scene Transitions

An important part of structuring your story in any format is the transition between scenes. When not handled properly, time and/or location jumps in a narrative can become disorientating and confusing, making it harder for the audience to keep up with the action. There are three important things to focus on when transitioning between scenes: where the first scene ends, where the second scene begins, and how to connect the two.

It’s important that each scene have closure. When you leave a scene, you need to know that the goal of that scene was reached. If you leave the scene too early, before you receive that closure, your audience will be left hanging, feeling unsatisfied and off balance. You need to ‘cut away’ when the scene comes to its natural end, when everything is understood and the audience is ready to move onto the next idea. If you leave the scene too late, it drags your story, and makes it feel like the scene is longer than it is.

As with the end of a scene, the beginning of a new scene must feel natural. If you have to backtrack immediately after starting your scene in order to explain whats going on, then it means you’re not starting at the beginning of the scene. You can sometimes get away with doing this, if the reflection is placed naturally in the writing, but you shouldn’t try and push your luck. If all of your scenes start with an immediate backpedal to explain where everyone is, how they got there, and when it takes place, then you need to go back and fix some things.

Information about the change in time and location are important to include. If you didn’t, then it would be impossible for the audience to tell if, when or how these changes occurred. The most widely accepted way of transitioning between scenes is to detail the things done by the characters to go from scene A to scene B. They can do so by showing the transition between locations (“They walked the distance to the theatre, laughing the whole way”), points in time (“hours passed as she sat reading in her favorite chair”), or combinations of the two (“they drove for days, the grassy hillsides of home growing into a looming mountain range”). The information in the transition must do everything to set up the new scene that’s starting.

I am going to use a segment from “These Shallow Graves” by Jennifer Donnelly as an example of what not to do when transitioning between scenes. In chapter thirty-four, a scene is ending where the protagonist and her love interest meet secretly during a ball and make a plan for her to sneak out later that evening. The scene ends on an angsty moment as they both watch her almost arranged fiance dancing with the competitor for his affections. Chapter thirty-five immediately begins with the two of them having met up and halfway to their destination. It is then explained how the protagonist had left the party early, snuck out, and made it to the meeting point.

Feels kinda jenky huh? Here’s how we could smooth this out.

Their plan for meeting up that evening involves the protagonist telling her uncle (who an attendee) that she is feeling faint and using that as an excuse to leave the ball early. This would make more sense as a place to end the scene as it signals the beginning of the transition between locations. When she sneaks out the house is a good place to officially begin the next scene, as it signals another change in locations. Because the time spent at the protagonist’s home is not important to the overall story (her waiting for everyone to fall asleep) this could serve as the transition between the scene of the first and the scene of the second meetings. The cab ride from her house to the meeting place is also its own small transition, and is a good place to reflect on past information without interfering with anything else going on (such as dialogue and bonding between love interests).

Remember! All of the important things to keep in mind when writing scene transitions are:
Know where to end a scene.
Know where to begin a scene.
Know how to connect the scenes.

Tips for Overcoming Insecurity

1. Believe you can make progress, and start to overcome it. That is the first, and the most important, step.

2. Think about a time when you took a chance, and pushed through your fear, and it worked out well. Remember that feeling – it can happen again.

3. Look for a role model - someone you relate to - who managed to overcome their insecurities. Let them inspire you and learn from their success.

4. Let go of the past, and whatever holds you back. Just focus on this moment, and taking one step now.

5. Stop resisting change – let whatever happens happen. You may discover that it works out even better than you’d thought.

6. Let the stress fall away and allow peace to flood your mind. As you learn to relax you’ll start to feel more confident.

4

Sketch dump. Whether you like MoonToffee or not, the ep where they’ll reveal their past will probably go down as one of the most important episode ever and i will punch someone if they dont make it a 22 minute episode. 

on another hand, hopefully i’ll finish both the starco sketch and tomco one. (Starco AU: Prince Marco from another dimension sent to Earth to learn how to go out of his shell) 

Ya know what I want?

I want for the Paladins to a “spring cleaning” in the Castle and the Lions and that they find all sort of stuff, especially from the paladins before them that once piloted their lions.

I want Lance to find a small heavy box filled with small squares that resemble photos and in all of them a young happy ex-Blue Paladin is smiling bright and big at the camera. I want him to go through all the photos of their adventures where they are on with blue paladin armor along with the rest team and photos of the planets and people they saved. I want him to be motivated of that and push himself to do as good as his senior Paladin did; to help, save and care.

I want Hunk to find video clips of the old paladin of his lion where he’s almost video blogging and he’s narrating the adventures. The videos start as a formal report but then slowly turn into a journal and Hunk is mesmerized by the story telling. The stories become more personal as the videos go on and then, in one of them, there’s a second tiny person besides the old yellow paladin, cradled in his arms and Hunk gasps out when Alfor whispers Allura’s name as he stares fondly at the small Altean baby.

I want Pidge to find all kind of dry plants and flowers in one of her lion’s compartments and for her to being curious enough to look their meaning and components, to see if they were related to the nature back in Olkari, but turns out they are just harmless simple silly plants/leaves/flowers/petals from different planets. I want her to find the old Green Paladin notebook with the characteristics of each plant and it’s enough for Pidge to search and wonder why they were so important to the past paladin. I want her to feel this soothing calm breeze inside her as she learns more and more about nature and feels a better connection with her Lion.

I want Keith to find sketches. I want him to find sketches of aliens, planets, explosions, Red, all the lions together, Voltron itself, the castle. I want him to see through the old red Paladin’s eyes and see their reality, to see the calling and good and belonging they had and wishing he could be part of that. I want him to pick up that extra empty journal he finds, covered in dust and falling blank pages, and start doing his own sketches, making up his mind and starts portraying his home, his team, his family he has found and creating his own path slowly.

Keep reading

Mercury

Mercury aspecting sun, mercury in the 5th: Mental vibrancies and illumination, self-expressive words conveying messages directly from the ego, confident opinions, vivid story-teller, words of creativity, youthful mind, passionate about learning, desires a strong intellect, willful, clever thinker, thinking and talking about themselves, their self-expression  

Mercury aspecting moon, mercury in the 4th: Nostalgic perception of reality, vivid memories, opinions of common sense, motherly messages directed to the masses, understands the emotions of the public, empathy for All, reserved and private mind, daydreamer, mind of the inner child, thinking and talking about emotions and finding Home

Mercury aspecting Venus, mercury in the 2nd: flowers and roots in the mind, blossoms of Venus symbolizing artsy, creative, beauty, serenity and musical appreciation, roots of the earth symbolizing wisdom, resourcefulness, patience, reliability and stability of the mind. Thinking and talking about life, pleasure and beauty.

Mercury aspecting Venus, mercury in the 7th: sweet messages of harmony from the heart, love and union on the mind, social breeze, accommodating opinions, attracted to youth and intellect, words dripping with sugar, thinking and talking about aesthetics, social equity and love 

Mercury aspecting mars, mercury in the 1st: words used for fighting and protecting themselves, active mind on overdrive, the mind is a battlefield, headaches, strong or offensive opinions, individualistic and passionate messages conveying motivation and inspiration. Wants to speak first. Knowledge (mercury) is power (mars). Thinking and talking about ambitions, sex and themselves

Mercury aspecting Jupiter, mercury in the 9th: visionary messages expressing ideals, indulgence in knowledge and learning, big stories, exaggerated opinions, daydreams of adventure and freedom, gift of the gab, jokester, professor, thinking and talking about spiritual and religious beliefs and inner philosophies 

Mercury aspecting Saturn, mercury in the 10th: Reticent speech, reserved opinions, unwillingly silent, mind of authority, voice of the public, voice of Judgment and Order, mental blocks or mental structure, practical, calculating and introspective thought trend, mentor, timeless knowledge, thinking and talking about self-discipline, experiences of self-perseverance and personal achievement 

Mercury aspecting Uranus, mercury in the 11th: Thinking outside the box, inside the box, below the box, above the box. Shocking opinions, universal mind, mad scientist mind, words conveying messages to the collective, sudden nerve pains, revolutionary and futuristic thought trend, thinking and talking about social justice, togetherness and liberation

Mercury aspecting Neptune, mercury in the 12th: receptive and emotionally psychic, words conveying messages from dreams, daydreamer, romantic visionary of life, perception of life glittered by rose-tinted glasses, reclusive, charming actor, walking dream, angels in the brain, empathy for the unfortunate and emotionally abandoned, thinking and talking about wishes, spirituality and alone time

Mercury aspecting Pluto, mercury in the 8th: solemn and prophetic thought trend, investigative mind, detective, soulful words conveying messages of pain and healing, empathy for the misunderstood and emotionally disturbed, demons in the brain, chatting and learning from past demons. Knowledge (mercury) is Power (pluto). Transformative mind; from mind of chaos to rebirth and mind of clarity, thinking about death, secrets and privacy

Mercury in the 3rd: erratic, restless and elastic thought process. creative cerebral surges, curious perception of reality, extremely adaptable to immediate environment, good-natured, gift of the gab and swift tongue, witty humor, chatty, eternal student, believes in the importance of knowledge, child-like wonder, perpetually questioning every facet of life, thinking and talking about Everything

Mercury in the 6th: analytical and calculating thought, stress disturbs the nerves, perceptive and digestive of information, daily routine studying, healing and serving with knowledge and understanding, grounded mind, detailed mind, magnifying glasses as eyes, structured and organized thought, thinking and talking about health, routine and self improvement

Touka and Kaneki a Step in the Right Direction

Touka and Kaneki are two characters in Tokyo Ghoul that in many ways have created a chemical reaction. Sometimes they are able to come together and make something useful but other times they cause an explosion. Touka and Kaneki are two characters who are similar but have reacted to their world differently. 

They are both lonely being raised by a single parent after the sudden death of the other, and the parent who raised them left permanent scars. Touka was raised by a hypocrite who told her that humans were to be cherished as he killed them behind her back. He would later leave home one night and never come home leaving Touka to develop abandonment issues, as she never felt good enough to keep her father around. She also kept her fathers lessons close to her heart and whenever she strayed she thought of herself as a monster.

Kaneki was raised by a mother who treated him kindly with conditions, as long as he was quiet and a good boy she treated him fine. But god forbid he acted like a normal child and didn’t think of his mothers issues he was abused. Then on top of that his mother died so suddenly that he felt abandoned and his foster family in his aunt made him a recluse which made him feel worse. Kaneki also carried around the twisted message of letting himself get hurt for the sake of others.

Touka and Kaneki grew from this so differently, Touka turned bitter towards that life before she was able to examine herself, and find peace with her lifestyle. Kaneki on the other hand internalized his frustrations acting like he was at piece with his life on the outside, but he was tearing himself apart on the inside. They developed opposite of each other, as Touka matured Kaneki fell apart. They worked so well together in the beginning because in the first part of tg they had similar development. Kaneki and Touka were trying to figure out what it meant to be a ghoul. Kaneki was trying to learn what his new life of a ghoul had for him, and Touka was learning that she could live a normal life away from the violent circle of hatred. Their paths meshed together so they grew together until a the same sunlight in a way.

However, as much as they grew together, they also grew closer together, the more their faults started to creep up on them both. Touka wanted to protect Kaneki because he was once human. But as Touka did that Kaneki became more concerned and decided to protect her at the cost of himself.

But in Kaneki’s need to protect her he hit her weakest emotional cord, abandonment. He told her he wasn’t going to go home with her, and told her she couldn’t help him and asked Tsukiyama and Banjou to go with him in front of her. All her childhood insecurities came back in that moment, she wasn’t good enough and it hurt her.

It was at this point that they developed separate from each other, where Touka became a normal high school girl and Kaneki became a serial killer and gang boss. They developed into two completely different paths and they didn’t know how to approach each other. When they met up again it showed through their conversation which inevitably resulted in Kaneki lying about being fine and Touka hitting him and telling him he hates how he changed. This exact moment triggered both of their childhood trauma’s. Touka with her issues of her not being good enough for her father and how he couldn’t confide in her. Causing her to lash out against everything he taught her, and Kaneki with his abuse and him doing exactly what she wanted from him.

However, because of the Anteiku raid they never got to reconcil, so thus three years go by and Kaneki is reborn as Haise. They developed apart and had a fresh start as Touka the waitress and Haise the investigator. This is so important because this is the time that without the burden of a past they fell for each other. This taught Touka a very important lesson, that she cares for Kaneki enough to let him go, but that she still cares for him and that not every change in him is bad. Kaneki learned that he has a permanent home in Touka one that she won’t take away based on conditions because even after she said she hated his change she gave him a place to return.

Then Kaneki changed again to a highly suicidal Kaneki, willing to die to be cool, to protect others. He hit his lowest low of the series and it was in that moment Touka said three words the struck him “See you later.” which he thought was cruel because he wanted to die. Touka knew but wanted him to understand the meaning of that and it caused him to hesitate to doubt, which lead to him making a change of heart during their fight with Arima. 

Kaneki and Touka are two characters that develop off of each other, they bring out the best and worst in each other. They both hit cords in each other, but they also can heal wounds that they never realized they had. This conversation between them in this chapter is an important example of that. Touka admits her man issue with Kaneki, which is the fact that he always leaves her. Something she never understood and something she keeps trying to fix to no avail. Then he tells her that it was to protect her, because he didn’t want to cause her trouble where she would end up dead.

 Then he asked her to come with him, which filled the void that she had for so long. Touka also helped fill one for Kaneki as well, which was his loneliness. I’m not saying that Touka is a cure for his problems but through her confession she showed him that she cared. Which shocked him like he couldn’t even believe, that someone cared for him.

I think that the most amazing thing that even if he doesn’t accept the feelings romantically its important for him to know. Kaneki isn’t in any shape or form mentally to be with someone, he’s someone living for the moment holding onto a fragile string to survive. But for someone who has craved being loved for so long, it’s something he needed to here, that someone accepts him with his faults and respects his decision for death even if they don’t agree and don’t want him to die.

This is so important because Touka and Kaneki have reached the moment where they realized the mistakes that they made that caused the other hurt. They were able to talk about it and reach a positive note for both of them, and I excited with how this will help them develop positively moving forward. 

Writing a Sunset: A Shitty How-to Manual for Writing Angst

Someone recently asked me the best way to write angst. Honestly, there is no best way. But I’ll do my darndest to explain what’s worked for me so far.

The best way to write angst is to write loss.

Now, I’ve seen this done so many ways before. I’ve seen death, I’ve seen destruction, I’ve seen cities burn and knives find their mark. With writers there’s an endless way to build and then knock down. Like lego bricks, you just have to find the best place to plant your foot for the entire structure to tumble down onto the carpet.

But my favorite kind of angst is actually something smaller. 

My favorite is what I call “Writing a Sunset”.

A character is created. Someone that we all know and love. They’re build from the bone to the skin to every lash and every smile line. We watch them learn and grow and sink and fall and tower and realize and live. And I, as the author, make sure to give you every detail of her life until you can look at the page and want to reach in and steal their hand in yours.

I also make sure that this character loves sunsets.

It’s the most important time of day for them. That time when the earth is still and silent. That time when the warmth begins its slow travel past a seemingly infinite horizon. Thick in it’s colors, it sinks below and drowns, and in its panic it sends out flares of reds and oranges and pinks that shoot across the sky, burning holes into the atmosphere and letting the stars breathe. 

And in that moment, when Orion is lounging against smothering blue and the tips of a nebula soak in the receding magma, this character owns their own world. All they have is the sky and all the sky has is itself and everything is perfect.

And it’s then that I make them blind. 

There is something to say about taking away what a character cherishes most. Because in the end our families and our smallest loves are what keep us together. We crave things, it’s true. And material possessions help to find their places in our lives. Losing a grandmothers necklace could be sad and misplacing a treasure map leading to adventure could be devastating.

But I always found it best to not take away what someone loves. But to take away access to it. To know that every day there’s a sunset waiting for them same as always but no longer can they seek it out. 

Don’t take away what someone loves.

Take away their hope of seeing it again.

If they’re a couple who want a child, take away that ability.

If he’s a dragon who needs to defend his keep, take away his fire.

If she’s a fairy who needs to fly, take away her wings.

But what I also find is that angst is not complete without hope. It’s pandoras box, really. And after sunsets, though it might seem dark, the dawn will eventually come.

And that’s where my favorite part comes in.

Taking away an ability doesn’t stop someone. It merely gives them a reason to try something else. And though it might seem bleak and hopeless, there’s always a chance. And that chance is sometimes the saddest and most joyful part of all.

When our character learns that by stretching their hands out and spreading their fingers like starfish to an aching sun, they can feel its first rays gliding though yearning fingers. Feel tears against their face and a smile stretching lines into permanence. Know that the darkness will always be there, but oh how the sunlight touches their skin… 

If they can’t have children, have them adopt.

If the dragon can’t breathe fire, have it befriend the blacksmith.

And if she can no longer fly, then run until the wind burns her face and scars her feet and she feels free again.

Writing a Sunset is my favorite kind of angst because it’s the one we can relate to most. The fear of losing what we don’t realize we love and the need to reach out and tell them it’ll be okay. Writing a Sunset means having the will to accept a fate you had no choice in, and finding a new way to see once more. 

Writing a Sunset reminds us all that sadness is real. But so is courage. And you can’t have one without the other.

The love interests through the mains’ phones

SKAM is a multimedia/cross platform show, so it only make sense that how characters interact with their friends through social media is important.

I think we’re getting important information through how the mains have been naming their love interest in their phone (I’m skipping Eva because she was already dating Jonas and therefore had him as…Jonas).

Noora had Dickhelm as “Willhelm”, the name she used to neg him. The name she kept in her phone as a way to “neg” the feelings she had for him. During a big part of the season, Noora lied to herself about her feelings for him, refusing to call him by his given name (which I understand…I couldn’t even make myself call him by his name in this meta).

Isak had Even as “Even Kosegruppa” showing how he didn’t know his family name past. He didn’t know where he came from.
Even when he finally learned his last names, he still couldn’t find him on social media. He still only met him at kosegruppa. Even didn’t seem to exist before.
Isak was still missing an important information about him. And he still wasn’t sure about him and Even’s feelings for him. 
“Even Kosegruppa” is as neutral as you can get. It’s not just “Even” because that would be too sentimental. That would mean he’s the first Even his mind goes to when he thinks about the name Even. “Even Kosegruppa” is casual.

Which brings us to Sana.
Yousef is hiding his phone number.
Getting someone’s number feels much more personal than getting someone’s Facebook. It’s a next step in a relationship. First we add each other on Facebook. Then we get each other’s phone numbers…and then we date (because, lbh, we’ll never share our tumblrs to each other).
She’s only been chatting casually with him, through his social media. His social appearance. This public image she had of him. The assumptions she made based on appearances.
The real Yousef is still unknown. We got a glimpse of him at the end of episode 4 but that was still only breaking the surface. She likes him. A lot. But she’s conflicted.
She liked him so much without even realising he didn’t believe in Allah. Which seems like a big part of someone’s identity. It’s certainly a big part of Sana’s.

So yeah.
Unknown.

[The original meta assumed that Sana didn’t have Yousef’s phone number and that it was why it was displayed as “unknown”. I made most of my conclusion around this misconception. Since then a lot of people have explained to me that a number shows as “unknown” if it’s been made private/hidden by the caller. Which only made my point better: we went from Yousef being “unknown/unsure” a character to Yousef outright hiding shit. So I edited the Sana/Yousef part of this meta quickly to reflect this updated information.]

saturn in the signs

aries - saturn in aries is a very challenging placement - saturn is exalted in libra and so falls in aries, which can be difficult when aries is such a force to be reckoned with. you may struggle to chase your ambitions for worry or self-esteem issues, or you could blindly leap after everything you desire without realising the responsibilities of your dreams. you can falter when trying to assert yourself, and you might feel older than your age, unable to let go and just live without repercussions. when you learn to have confidence in yourself and your abilities, the results of your projects will reflect your inner balance. 

taurus - in taurus, saturn’s lessons revolve around security. saturn in taurus really struggles to feel comfortable, stable and safe, and they often cling onto things to find a sense of security in life. but material possessions can’t fulfil you ultimately, and that’s a lesson that saturn in taurus needs to learn. they need to go a little deeper and learn to feel secure in themselves before they can find it in the world. hard work and a little bit of luxury will help them to find what they need, but they have to be open to receive it. they can struggle to express their romantic and creative side too, so it’s important to embrace the parts of themselves that they so often leave behind. 

gemini - saturn in gemini can really struggle in their early years, and this is because gemini embodies so much of the childhood experience - education, curiosity, thinking and learning, siblings and the hometown. they are prone to falling into negative thought patterns, and may struggle with nervousness and anxiety too. this placement often indicates shyness, especially in early life, but it does ease up as you age so don’t fret. saturn in gemini can really take their time learning a subject, but once they fully understand, they never forget and seem to master the subject effortlessly. they are logical, make great writers and teachers, and often doubt their abilities. they often have a head for business too, but it’s imperative that they learn to communicate clearly and without inner chaos for their many talents to manifest. i would suggest writing out your feelings if you’re struggling with this placement, because it’s easy to feel alone in the world with it and nobody should feel that way.

cancer - saturn in cancer controls their emotions. they often lock them away and may struggle to understand and express their own levels of empathy and emotion. it’s a life lesson for these people to learn to come out of their shell and live for themselves, as they can often suppress their passions and needs for the sake of their family’s. saturn in cancer often clings to others, craving the warmth and security they needed as a child; however, they hate to be dependant or needy, and so there’s this inner push-pull that can easily spiral into self hatred if allowed. it’s important that they look at themselves and their past, come to terms with it and try to learn from it too. if you have saturn in cancer, try to create a soothing home that puts warmth in your heart, as the home environment of these people is very important to them and can help them feel more secure. it’s also worth trying to build up your confidence, as you will feel much better if you have your own back.

leo - saturn in leo often manifests as a strong-willed, deeply ambitious person, who can come across as cold and stubborn, but really just needs recognition for what they do. they want people to admire them, and this need to be recognised often comes from childhood somewhere. ego plays a bit part in the life of leo in saturn, and they can struggle to connect with their true selves - they usually have tons of creative talent but no knowledge of how to unlock it, and so are prone to frustration. these people tend to feel they are inferior to others, and they can sabotage themselves by putting themselves down. they can be jealous too, and they try to protect their delicate selves from others by being cold and aloof. the lessons that saturn in leo need to learn revolve around humility, creativity and love; love for others, sure, but mostly for themselves, because it’s this cold centre that brings all the trouble. you must balance the power you have inside, and if you can, you’ll find true joy in life at last.

virgo - this is a great placement for saturn if you can make the most of it; unfortunately it’s not so great if you can’t. at its worst, saturn in virgo brings compulsive behaviours, control issues, harsh self-criticism and niggling health concerns. however, these modest people are hardworking, able to see the little details that make something perfect, cautious and excellent planners. they just need a little push in the right direction, a self-esteem boost, and to learn to let go. hypochondria can develop in times of stress, as well as anxiety issues in general, but if they can learn to manage their stresses and become more relaxed in day-to-day life, these problems will ease up considerably. control can seem to keep them sane, but in all honesty you’ll never control everything, and if you can’t handle losing it, you’ll never be able to keep it. turn that brilliant mind inwards and look at what’s truly good for you; you’ll know.

libra - saturn is exalted in libra, and so it’s quite a nice placement really; these people are fair and pleasant, and quite charming. this can seem a very natural and even easy placement for saturn, but of course it isn’t without its lessons; saturn in libra often experiences restriction when it comes to relationships. they can struggle to relate to others on a personal level, and may find it very hard to be in a relationship. the relationships they do enter may feel forced or loveless, but they themselves don’t know how to mend these holes. the key lies within, and reflection will definitely help. once you are aware of the patterns you form throughout your life, you can work on changing the ones that aren’t helpful for you, and you can experience more open, romantic and pleasant relationships. it’s important to stabilise yourself and take responsibility for the relationships you aren’t happy with, for this placement to flourish.

scorpio - now this is one of the more turbulent positions for saturn; scorpio is so raw, so emotional and sometimes chaotic, while saturn seeks the tangible, control, results. however, i actually this has the potential to be a really good placement; these people are intuitive, determined and mentally very strong. they are calculating and sometimes quite controlling, in the murky manner of scorpio. the main problem with this placement is that saturn restricts the emotional goldmine that is scorpio. this can lead to all manner of emotional issues, repressed memories, and even holding onto negative energies around them. they can struggle to see their true intentions and often fear rejection and abandonment deeply. they can struggle to open themselves up to another person or be intimate. they must learn to open their eyes and look at themselves honestly, with the same sharpness they look at others, and then focus all that immense energy on healing from whatever is dragging them down. it’s hard and painful, but we all know the strength of this placement.

sagittarius - saturn in sagittarius can seem like a weird match, right? but actually, it fits quite well. this placement brings strong ethics and morals, a real lust for learning, skepticism and strong intuition. however, these people may feel dissatisfied with their education, feeling it did them no good and that they need to teach themselves. they can swing from skeptical to cynical in the blink of an eye, or from intuitive to blindly guessing at life. this placement is surprisingly prone to bouts of depression, as it’s hard to need your freedom but be scared of the consequences of it. they can struggle to open up and trust others, and can sometimes rebel just for the sake of rebelling, rather than because they believe it’s right. the lessons of this placement focus on balancing ethical codes with human needs and wants, structuring your learning so you can make the most of it, and learning to find the wonder in the world. this placement is great for teachers and often leads to your becoming a leader in your chosen field, but you must heal from your issues first.

capricorn - saturn is at home in capricorn, but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t have its own set of challenges like any other saturn placement. issues of control and perfectionism can make achievements difficult, although this is actually a very hard working placement that prides itself on its achievements and the completion of goals. saturn in capricorn often sees things in black and white, feeling that emotions are all awful things that distract from progress, and anything less than perfection is failure. but awareness is a huge part of making strides, and as much as they crave recognition, their inner self needs recognition by the outer self in order to truly flourish. time heals all wounds, and keeping this in mind will help you to heal your own. 

aquarius - saturn in aquarius is a natural psychiatrist, a scientist at heart. they can apply themselves fully to anything that peaks their interest, and their hearts are solid gold. but they can struggle to fit in amongst their peers, and their way of living can be unconventional and possibly even distressing to them. it’s important that they learn to balance their own lifestyles with their dreams and morals. these people are wonderful friends, and have fair hearts. as the traditional ruler of aquarius, saturn is surprisingly comfortable here, and if you can be honest with yourself and apply your beautiful minds and hearts to the world around you, i think this is actually a wonderful placement for saturn.

pisces - saturn in pisces can be a very tough placement, as saturn deals with structure and pisces dissolves everything it touches. but this is a sensitive and extremely creative placement for saturn, and if you listen to its lessons, you are likely to become a wise and empathic person, without feeling consumed by negativity. it’s very easy to fall into depression with this placement, because you may feel responsible for others, but if you learn to put your needs first and to step back when you need to, you’ll find this eases up considerably. inner reflection and connecting the mind and body to the soul, will help you on your journey. it’s important to learn to say no and to let out your feelings through some creative pastime. 

Mine | Theo Raeken Imagine

pairings: theo raeken x reader

warnings: ass grabbing idk

prompt: “grab her ass in front of guys that want her, and grab her ass in front of girls that want you.”

a/n: i’m a sucker for over-protective theo.

Dating wasn’t easy, Dating Theo Raeken was a full on suicide mission. But no matter how hard it seemed, It would always be worth it; For the both of you.

You and Theo started dating a couple months after he came to Beacon Hills, Even though you were a beta in Scotts pack and surprisingly even after all the terrible things he did to your pack you saw the man in the monster, You accepted him and his flaws; And that’s exactly what made Theo fall oh-so deep in love with you. But when you started dating, Even though Theo is a big fan of PDA and not to mention one hell of a jealous wolfie, You two kept your relationship low-key.

This may have caused a couple of problems, Considering your boyfriend basically has a group of fangirls constantly by his side you may have been caught jealous a few times. But I mean, Who could blame them? Your boyfriend has one hell of a body; But then again, It’s your boyfriend.

And let’s be honest here, Theo was basically always jealous and not to mention over protective over you when it comes to other guys. Any time he saw a guy coming up to you, And especially if he was flirting with you, He would always walk up next to you and pull you into a passionate kiss showing everyone who you belong too.

Today was not exceptional for you two.

Keep reading

Jasper Jordan is important representation for metal illness

Clarke Griffin is important representation, because she learned she had to overcome her pain, not run from it, and because she is also a bisexual female leader 

Raven Reyes is important representation of a physically disabled woman, who never let a heart murmur or a leg brace stop her from saving the freaking world.

Bellamy Blake is important representation because he shows that you can try to do the right thing after realizing your mistakes

Monty Green is important representation for not letting someone emotionally abuse you just because you care deeply about them

Octavia Blake is important representation for learning how to grow from your past to embrace you future with strength and courage, never letting anything keep you down and out

Emori is important representation of a person with a defect, who hid it all her life, before coming to accept and love her body for what it is

Bryan and Nathan Miller are important representations of a monogamous, interracial relationship

Luna is important representation for not doing something you don’t believe in, even though everyone is pressuring you to

Marcus Kane is important representation for trying to get two different cultures to coexist peacefully, while also respecting that culture’s traditions and beliefs

John Murphy is important representation of a male rape victim, and of never giving up, even if it means leaving your familiar surroundings to find where you belong.

I’m not saying this show doesn’t play with your emotions, because it does, and good TV shows always do, but that doesn’t mean the characters don’t mean something

Let’s talk about the evolution of Percy Jackson throughout the PJO series

He starts off as a confused, lost, awkward 12 year old who had been to a completely different school each year and never felt like he fit in. He’s witty, angsty, sarcastic, and bitter. His looks are average, he has a lack of self-esteem, and doesn’t seem to care about much. He lives with an abusive step-father, and him and his mom have barely anything to get on.

Slowly, as he learns he’s a demigod, he begins to realize that Camp Half-Blood, the place he discovers, might just be his home. He starts to go on quests and actually succeeds, which is something he had never thought he could do. Percy tries to save the world because he finally feels like there’s a purpose to his life. He had felt angry and betrayed by his father, but now acknowledges what Poseidon has done for him, and actually respects him.

Then comes Thalia Grace, who begins to make him question his confidence. He starts to think: Am I really that great? Couldn’t anybody do my quests just as I did? She makes him doubt himself, because deep down he secretly wants to be the boy from the prophecy. He finally feels like there is a reason for him to work hard in life. But Thalia makes him feel threatened, hence the ever-important fight between them.

By the end, they reconcile and learn from each other’s mistakes, which in turn strengthens Percy’s confidence. As the prophecy nears, Percy fights and trains more than he had ever before, and now is seen as a leader. Someone the demigods can count on. Someone they look up to. He takes a risk by jumping into the River Styx, but he does it for his camp, his friends, his f a m i l y. Never would past Percy do something like this. But this Percy does, because he legitimately cares. Later, he storms through rows of monsters, slashes through countless enemies, and hurries from one group of campers to another in order to save his city.

Think about what he had said in the Last Olympian: “‘What did they do?’ My voice sounded tight and angry. ‘What did they do to my city?’”. His city. The city he’s been living in his whole life, the one that he never really thought much about in the past. But now, it’s his city. And right then and there we can tell that he will do anything to protect those who call it their home.

Percy Jackson learns to become a role model for the demigods who are scared out of their minds, because to them, Kronos is a nightmare. They don’t have self-hope, they have no idea what will happen to them. But Percy gives them that hope. He inspires them to fight as hard and strong as they possibly can in order to save their camp. He treats them as strong warriors, and he believes in them. More importantly, he believes in himself.

When confronted by Kronos in the Battle of the Labyrinth, he had had no confidence at all. In fact, he ran. He ran. But in the Last Olympian, there was no running. The only thing he would do is walk straight forward. Because he was tired of countless enemies tormenting him and his friends. He was exhausted, and wanted to put a stop to it. It was difficult seeing Luke, someone he had thought of as a friend, standing in front of him as his greatest enemy. And in that moment, he makes a choice. The choice of leaving the responsibility on Luke, and trusting that he would make the right decision. This was something only a leader could do, and a leader is what Percy had become.

Gone was the lost, scared, confused, and awkward little boy. Gone was the boy who had little self-confidence, who gave into taking a potion that would change his appearance, simply because that was what he had thought mattered. Gone was the boy who felt constantly bitter, who was antagonized and targeted by his ADHD and dyslexia, who lived each day knowing that by the end of the school year, he would surely be expelled, and his mom would have to send him to another one.

The older Percy, the one that saved Olympus, saved the world, is so much different. He manages to last two years (and counting) at Goode High School, something he had never thought he could do. He embraces his flaws because he knows it makes him stronger. He learns to accept his ADHD and dyslexia because it in fact makes him a more powerful demigod. He leads the Camp Half-Blood campers into battle and helps them gain their own confidence. He has friends who truly care about him and would sacrifice themselves for him, just as he would. He gains much more knowledge and experience about his abilities and realizes that they make him special.

Perseus Jackson has had the smoothest, and most perfect evolution throughout the series. 

A Note About Sunburn Care

Since summer is on its way and I’ve never seen a post addressing this, I thought it might be good to make one. I know it seems basic, but some of the common knowledge surrounding sunburn care is actually incorrect!

Now, I’m not a doctor and my advice is not a replacement for medical care, but you guys already knew that.

First: 

Wear sunscreen

I know that you’ve heard it before, but this is genuinely so important. Everyone should wear sunscreen for protection, but if you have fair skin prone to burning, then you’re in even greater danger of suffering. Please keep yourself safe. 

Sunblock and sunscreen are actually two different things. Sunblock generally provides a greater degree of protection. Sunscreen breaks down more quickly through exposure to the sun, so it usually needs to be reapplied more frequently, however both sunblock and sunscreen must be reapplied.

The general rule is to reapply every two hours, or every hour if you are in a situation where you are sweating heavily, swimming, or otherwise getting wet. There is actually no such thing as water-proof sunscreen, although some brands make the claim. Usually they are water resistant for anywhere between 40 and 80 minutes. Reapplying is key. 

Just doing the above things will go a long way toward protecting you. We don’t live in a perfect world, though, so chances are you’re going to get burned at some point, maybe even badly. If that happens, you should know how to take care of it.

Second:

I want you to know that sunburns can sometimes be very serious. I have had sunburns so severe that I required emergency care in the form of professional medical intervention. If you feel as though you have been burned so badly that you cannot safely care for it on your own, you are not imagining it or being dramatic in any way. I required several steroid injections, as well as antibiotics and prescription pain killers to recover from my worst sunburn. Do not hesitate to seek medical attention if you need it. 

Third:

You have a sunburn and you’ve determined that you don’t need to go to the emergency room, so you’ll be caring for it at home. Awesome!

The most important part of sunburn care is knowing that sunburns are exactly what the name implies. They are burns. This means that you should treat them in much the same way that you would treat a burn of any other variety. 

The first thing you need to do is draw the heat out. Have you ever touched your sunburned skin and realized it was much warmer than the rest of you? That’s the problem you want to address first. As long as that heat remains, your skin is still actively burning. Your sunburn will continue to get worse for as long as the heat remains. 

To draw the heat out, soak in a bath or step into a shower of lukewarm water, or water that feels as if it is neither cold nor warm when it passes over your hand/wrist. This is important. Do not use water on the coldest setting. Do not use ice packs or buckets of frigid ice water or any other freezing thing that wikihow recommended. This will damage your skin further. This is a mistake that I have made in the past. It is terrible. Please, please, please learn from my ignorance. 

Depending on the severity of your burn, you may need to remain under the cool water for quite a long time. I once had to soak for something like four hours to draw the heat out of a bad burn. You want the burn to be the same temperature as the rest of your skin by the time you’re done. Prepare for an extended soak by bringing music, books, whatever you need to keep yourself entertained. 

The same effect can be achieved by using towels soaked in cool water on the burned skin, but this is messy and takes much longer, as the towels must be resoaked in water and reapplied every few minutes. The presence of heavy cloth on the damaged skin can also cause irritation and pain.

There are several products on the market which are sold for the purpose of treating sunburns, many of them are even genuinely helpful, but they should never be applied before you have cooled the burned skin. If you apply heavy creams, lotions, or even straight aloe before the heat has been removed from the burn, you are trapping the heat to the skin and worsening the burn. Please don’t do this.

Once you have soaked in cool water and the burn no longer feels hot to the touch, apply the sunburn cream of your choice. These are not strictly necessary, but they will help to manage the pain and dryness that follows. I often use aloe or coconut oil on mine. 

A few extras: 

Outside of the obvious pain and discomfort, sunburns can also cause headaches, fatigue, and body aches/chills, as well as dehydration. Don’t be surprised if you experience these other effects. You can treat any aches with an over the counter pain killer such as ibuprofen, naproxen, or acetaminophen. You should drink a lot of water following your sunburn, as your body will need the extra help hydrating!

Alright, that’s all I have for you! Thanks for reading. Now go forth and safely own your summers, my friends! Take care <3

Spell to Release Emotional Blockage

Forward: My Mother was physically abused by her first husband. She had PTSD and carried her emotional baggage like a nuclear bomb. She carried it day in and day out, waiting for when it would explode. This is what PTSD will do to a person. It will cause you to detonate in public, at your loved ones, at a stranger, or even a flickering light bulb without warning. She’d been carrying it for 20 years. Until she did a spell to let go. This is that spell.


This is not a spell to get rid of PTSD. My mother did not want to get rid of it. It had become deeply rooted inside of her, it made her the strong person she is today. She’s learned important life lessons from her experience. Taking it away would turn her into a stranger who is nothing like my wild, fierce mother. She didn’t want her past to change, she just wanted to let go.


Tools:

  • Geode
  • Black salt
  • Chalk
  • Hammer (Cleansed)
  • Basic circle casting materials

Instructions

  1. Make Shadow Stone- The first step is to make the Geode into a shadow stone. This involves focusing on the stone and imaging your trauma being manifested inside it. The outer geode will symbolize the blockage. Imagine the outer shell of the geode not allowing the trauma to pass. Do not actually put your trauma inside, just create a projection or shadow of the pain. Do this on the New Moon. Continue to do this every night for an entire Lunar Month if you want the spell to be strong. (If you don’t have the time, one session will due.)
  2. The Ritual- When the Lunar month has past and a New Moon has come, it is time to perform the Spell. Cast your basic circle, however that may be. Call Elements and whatever Deities or Spirits you want to aid you in your release. Make sure the circle is large. We are going to fit another inside of it. 
  3. One-Way circle- A One-Way circle is a circle made of Black salt. Black salt is very good at containing strong negative energies while allowing persons/covens to send good energies in. We will use this circle to contain whatever negative energies may come pouring out. If the trauma has been pushed down for a long time, removing the blockage will be like releasing a flood gate. This will protect anyone or any tools that are nearby. Create the One-Way circle especially if you are performing the spell with another person or coven. 
  4. Creating One-Way circle- Use chalk to draw pentagram on floor (the pentagram is used to keep the person protected in the circle. It is not necessary if you cannot do it.) Make pentagram big enough for a person to comfortably sit in. Next, sit in pentagram with shadow stone and hammer. Trace pentagram circle with black salt. Say something along these lines (I believe a spell is more powerful if they are your own words): “Here lies the One-Way Circle. No negative energy shall exit. Only positive energy shall enter. The circle is sealed.”
  5.  Release- Focus on the shadow stone and project your trauma inside it. Say words along the lines of “I will move on from my past. I will not let myself be controlled by these negative emotions any longer. I will remove whatever blocks me from moving on when the stone breaks. I release you. I release you. I release you.” Break the Stone.
  6. Break down- Break down circle and cleanse space. 
  7. Cleanse- Bury shattered geode for a full lunar month to cleanse. Dig up and display on altar as reminder of your inner strength.

I love this spell because it allows you to move on without removing what will make you strong. We sometimes keep ourselves from moving on from our past. We keep ourselves living the pain over and over. You may believe you deserve the pain or know no other way to live and cling to it out of fear of letting yourself be happy. 

Let Go. Be Happy. Be Strong.