import racing

“But here, condensed into one 10-minute span, I recognized the sinking feeling of being betrayed by a white woman you’ve stanned for, loved, liked, or even simply been mildly okay with. It’s that feeling when you find out that, after enjoying her in Easy A and finding her bubbly personality lovable, Emma Stone was fine with playing an Asian woman in Aloha. Maybe you went through it with Scarlett Johansson when you found out that she’d accepted the lead role in Ghost in the Shell, an adaptation of a Japanese anime series. It’s the betrayal you feel the first time you realize that women who are labeled pop-culture feminist icons, like Tina Fey, are perfectly fine with gunning for blackface laughs at your expense, or blaming your idols for white girls’ lack of self-esteem. (Beyoncé is many things, but she is not the reason you hate your body.)

For some, it’s the 53 percent of white women who voted for Trump, or finding out that the leader of your local NAACP chapter is literally a white woman in disguise. For others it’s finding out that Taylor Swift’s been coasting on America’s fear of black men for years. I feel it every time I realize there’s a white women on my Twitter timeline who will tweet in earnest for Planned Parenthood while sparing only a perfunctory tweet for Black Lives Matter or the Standing Rock Sioux.

The thought that white people may see you as no more than a body for use or a culture from which you can pick and choose what you like while discarding the rest and those who invented it? The idea that a white woman you see as your potential friend or ally will eventually prove to be looking out for her own best interests over yours or the greater good? These are concepts that the people of color watching this film are intimately familiar with.

White women have always played, and continue to play, a large part in upholding the supremacy. They have not held the best interests of people of color.”

— Get Out Perfectly Captures the Terrifying Truth About White Women”

3

HERE THEY FUCKING ARE. The next installation of my character sheets for Amis and Co. 
Enjolras (the rooster is named Jean-Paul and he sleeps with it), Cosette (send me suggestions for what colors that gradient in her hair is) and Eponine (WHAT A BABE). 

Find Jehan, Combeferre and Courfeyrac here.

*Check the tags for relevant headcanons.

Iron Fist Isn’t Bad. People are just Racist.

I watched it and based on the media I was expecting it to be somewhat disappointing. However, I loved it. I loved it more than I did Daredevil. I thought the plot was fun and Finn Jones is a GIFT. How dare you racist (and yes I do mean racist) people attack the show and lie about it because Danny Rand is white. It does not deserve the hate it is getting. Racism is defined as discrimination based on someone’s skin color and I have seen nothing but hate for Finn Jones based on nothing but being a white guy who is playing a character from a comic book released in the 70s and in case you guys didn’t know, Danny Rand in the comic books is white. If we changed Luke Cage to be white that would be the exact same thing and I would be just as pissed if not more so. Danny being white allows for a very special dynamic between him and Luke Cage.

When you write hateful things about Iron Fist because they didn’t hire an actor that has an Asian background,  it isn’t progressive; you are putting distances between cultures again by covering up that history between Danny and Luke and what that relationship stood for.

Iron Fist and Power Man were written as a way to bridge the gaps between two cultures during a time where that relationship was considered a little more taboo. They are best friends (Luke actually names his daughter “Dany” after him) and race didn’t matter to them. Luke didn’t care that Danny was white and that meant something at that time. This relationship means more with Danny being white because it helped overcome a great deal of racial disagreements; it showed a black man and a white man could have that relationship that was entirely accepting and respectful of both cultures despite those cultures having a history of bad feelings.

 I’m not saying I don’t want other cultures to be represented; of course I do, I’m just saying I like that Marvel honors the comic book origins especially when it has that unique history. My message here is; don’t hate Iron Fist because he’s white. Watch the series and if you hate it that’s fine but actually look at the series and not just the skin color. 

in honor of the march today:

black women are important
brown women are important
biracial women are important
mixed race women are important
migrant women are important
lesbian, gay, bi, pan, poly, demi, ace etc. women are important
trans women are important
intersex women are important
young women are important
old women are important
disabled women are important
mentally ill women are important
chronically ill women are important
women from all around the world are important

every single woman is important

We don’t know Miley Cyrus and we don’t know how she really feels, but the narrative she’s been creating is not one that suggests respect or a deep understanding of the humanity of black artists. Instead, it’s a narrative in which she uses black culture as a prop when it is convenient to her, and when it’s not, she throws it away. That’s not a narrative she can win.