impetuously

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Nike to release “Pro Hijab” for Muslim women in spring 2018

  • On the heels of its campaign ad featuring Muslim athletes, Nike is taking a stand against discrimination. 
  • The athletic wear company announced the release of the “pro hijab,” Al Arabiya English reported on Monday.
  • “The Nike Pro Hijab may have been more than a year in the making, but its impetus can be traced much further back, to an ongoing cultural shift that has seen more women than ever embracing sport,” a statement from Nike said, according to Al Arabiya English.
  • The “pro hijab” is set to be released in spring 2018. Its creation follows years of controversy regarding Muslim women keeping their hair covered during athletic competitions. Read more (3/7/17 11:10 AM)

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TAROT REFERENCE

Major Arcana

0 The Fool – New beginnings, optimism, trust in life; Reversed: Delays

1 The Magician – Action, the power to manifest; Reversed: Misunderstandings.

2 The High Priestess – Inaction, going within, the subconscious; Reversed: Manipulations.

3 The Empress – Abundance, nurturing, fertility, life in bloom; Reversed: Neglect

4 The Emperor – Structure, stability, rules and power; Reversed: Chaos

5 The Hierophant – Institutions, tradition, society and its rules; Reversed: Hypocrisy

6 The Lovers – Sexuality, passion, choice, uniting; Reversed: Separation

7 The Chariot – Movement, progress, integration; Reversed: Defeat

8 Strength – Courage, subtle power, integration of animal self; Reversed: Fear

9 The Hermit – Meditation, solitude, consciousness; Reversed: Isolation

10 Wheel of Fortune – Cycles, change, ups and downs; Reversed: Stagnation

11 Justice – Fairness, equality, balance; Reversed: Lies

12 The Hanged Man – Surrender, new perspective, enlightenment; Reversed: Stubbornness.

13 Death – The end of something, change, the impermeability of all things; Reversed: Limbo

14 Temperance – Balance, moderation, being sensible; Reversed: Impatience

15 The Devil – Destructive patterns, addiction, giving away your power; Reversed: Freedom

16 The Tower – Collapse of stable structures, release, sudden insight; Reversed: Control

17 The Star – Hope, calm, a good omen; Reversed: Darkness

18 The Moon – Mystery, the subconscious, dreams; Reversed: Paranoia

19 The Sun – Success, happiness, all will be well; Reversed: Failure

20 Judgment – Rebirth, a new phase, inner calling; Reversed: Regrets

21 The World – Completion, wholeness, attainment, celebration of life; Reversed: Incomplete

Suit of Swords
• Other Names: Staves, arrows, spades
• Element: Air
Attributes: Active, male
Astrological Signs: Gemini, Libra, Aquarius
• Direction: West
Season: Pagan – Spring / Esoteric – Autumn
• Self: Mind, thoughts, intellect
Jungian Function: Thinking
Body Part: Head
Qabbalistic World: Yetzirah – the Formative World

Air is seen as the intellect, logic and reasoning. An active element, Air circulates and so cleanses; it carries your thoughts and dreams; is also expansive when hot and is said to be expressive. Your mind or thoughts can be seen as clear or clouded; speech requires breath, which requires air.

Swords represent logic, the mind and your thoughts. They deal with problems and troubles, planning, communication, ideas, your intellect and how you use it. They represent your daily and life struggles, problems in general. The very nature of a sword is aggressive and warlike. Combined with the swiftness of air, the combination can see situations arise quickly. The ability to see clearly means resolution is quick also. Swords people are great thinkers. You will find them in study, research, academia, the sciences, law courts and libraries. They love to learn and live to do it in any capacity.

Keywords: decisions, worries, problems, issues, tension, communication, intelligence, disagreements; arguments, logic, reason, cognition, ideas, inspirations, balance, equilibrium, the mind, mentalism, thinking, facts and figures, definition.
Reversed: vicious, ruthless, manipulative, cold, unemotional, spite and malice, accidents, inertia, indecision, confusion, mental blockages, biased, illogical, mental health issues, negative life changes.


• King – Serious, controlling, rational and mind/intellect-focused; Reversed: Foolish
• Queen – Intelligent, writer, communicative yet cold; Reversed: Ineffective
• Knight – Fierce, determined, aggressively pursues goals; Reversed: Boredom
• Page – mentally unstable or intellectually immature, acts without thinking; Reversed: Stupidity
• Ace of Swords – A fresh start, a sudden opportunity or idea, clarity; Reversed: Improbable
• 2 – Indecision; Reversed: Conflicts
• 3– Heartbreak, betrayal; Reversed: Torment
• 4 – Meditation, rest, retreat; Reversed: Disturbance
• 5 – Mind games, hostility; Reversed: Treachery
• 6 – Leaving, accepting help, going somewhere better; Reversed: Trouble
• 7 – Secret plans, abandoning ship; Reversed: Clumsiness
• 8 – feeling powerless and stuck; Reversed: Escaping
• 9 – Overactive mind, anxiety; Reversed: Martyrdom
• 10 – Feeling defeated, self-sabotage; Reversed: Sabotage

Suit of Cups
• Other Names: Chalices, Grails, Cauldrons, Hearts, Vessels
• Element: Water
Attributes: Passive, female; cold, wet
Astrological Signs: Pisces, Cancer, Scorpio
• Direction: East
Season: Pagan – Autumn- / Esoteric – Summer
• Self: Emotions, love, receptivity
Jungian Function: Feeling
Body Part: Heart
Qabbalistic World: Briah – the Creative World

Water is seen as the emotions, your feelings, and your intuition. Considered passive, water can be deep or shallow; you like the ocean, are responsive to the moon; your tears can rise and fall; out of control, your emotions flood;

Cups represent your emotions, feelings, your subconscious, intuition and psychism. They deal with love affairs, all relationships, inner expression, your reactions or responses and the pursuit of happiness. Generally passive and not outwardly extrovert, creativity through expression are some of the traits of this suit. Careers are usually in the arts or creative pursuits, they are, poets, painters, florists and designers, nurses, social workers and care-givers. Cups people are happy in the background doing their own thing, though they are often actors distinguishing the limelight from private time like no others.

Keywords: creative, intuitive, clairsentient, psychic, passive, affectionate, receptive, imaginative, caring, relationships, love, dreams, sensitivity, romantic, artistic, spiritual, compassionate, tactile, nurturing, the unconscious mind, domesticity, culture, expression, flexibility, fluidity, calm motion, serenity, empathetic, aesthetics and beauty.
Reversed: needy, co-dependent, intense, neglectful, fantasists, uncaring, cold, unfeeling, moody, unresponsive, illogical, lost, negative, pessimistic, emotional, overly sentimental, tearful, selfish.


• King – Repression of deep feelings, possible alcoholism; Reversed: Selfishness
• Queen – Emotionally nurturing, intuitive, sensitive; Reversed: Ignorance
• Knight – Romantic, adventurous, following one’s heart; Reversed: Pessimism
• Page – Creative, inspired, learning artistic skill; Reversed: Gloomy
• Ace of Cups – emotional fulfillment, joy; Reversed: Indifferent
• 2 – Partnership, mutual attraction, compatibility; Reversed: Abandonment
• 3 – Celebration, fun with friends, laughter; Reversed: Jealousy
• 4 – Boredom, dissatisfaction with what is being offered; Reversed: Avoidance
• 5 – Dwelling on the negative, self-pity; Reversed: Alienation
• 6 – Sentimentality, kindness, help; Reversed: Discouraging
• 7 – So many choices, indecision, getting lost in fantasy, wishing and dreaming; Reversed: Lethargic
• 8 – Abandoning something in search of something better, vision; Reversed: Sacrifice
• 9 – Indulgence, self-satisfaction; Reversed: Disintegration
• 10 – Emotional bliss, happiness, attainment; Reversed: Disruption


Suit of Wands
• Other Names: Batons, Staves, Rods, Clubs, Staffs, Scepters
• Element: Fire
Attributes: Active, masculine; hot, dry
Astrological Signs: Aries, Leo, Sagittarius
• Direction: South
Season: Pagan – Summer / Esoteric – Spring
• Self: Will, actions, desire
Jungian Function: Intuition
Body Part: Genitals
Qabbalistic World: Atziluth – the Archetypal World

Fire is energy and action, passion, drive and ambition. An active element, it can cause permanent change; is expansive; can be aggressive; is pro-active and undeterred.

Wands represent creativity, energy, passion and action. They cover your spiritual pursuits, your career and creative projects. Leadership, self-growth and general optimism are some traits of this suit. Careers are usually in business, they are leaders, entrepreneurial & sales focused. Wands people like to get ahead and are generally pro-active in all their activities. With an unrivaled healthy vitality, they are often accomplished sports people.

Keywords: intuition; creativity; vitality; sexuality; spirituality; vision; energetic; outgoing; impulsive; motivational; pro-active; spirit and spirited; optimistic; enterprise; commerce; business; careers; opportunities; the thrill of the chase; competitive; growth; personal development; inspirational; enthusiastic; sexual; passionate; action; movement; initiation.
Reversed: rash; impetuous; ruthless; greedy; narrow-minded; hyperactive; brash; manipulative; conniving; mean-spirited; overly optimistic; risk takers; heartless; aggressive; selfish; misleading; sadistic; distrusting of others.

• King – Career focused, mature, passionate; Reversed: Impostor
• Queen – Confidant, focused, has zest for life; Reversed: Fatigue
• Knight – An adventurous risk taker who follows his passions; Reversed: Apathy
• Page – newly inspired, excited about life and work; Reversed: Passive
• Ace of Wands – New beginnings, creative spark, fertile ideas; Reversed: Unpromising
• 2 – Contemplation, assessing one’s life direction; Reversed: Dispute
• 3 – Reaping the rewards of your efforts; Reversed: Idleness
• 4 – Celebration, safety, the home; Reversed: Discord
• 5 – Competition, minor struggles or disagreements; Reversed: Timidness
• 6 – Success, accolades and achievement; Reversed: Disapproval
• 7 – Feeling defensive and on guard; Reversed: Yielding
• 8 – Speed, things manifesting quickly; Reversed: Stagnation
• 9 – Pessimism, gearing up for the worst; Reversed: Weakness
• 10 – Feeling oppressed, exhaustion, too many responsibilities; Reversed: Impractical

Suit of Pentacles
• Other Names: Disks, Coins, Deniers, Stones, Diamonds
• Element: Earth
Attributes: Passive, female
Astrological Signs: Taurus, Virgo, Capricorn
• Direction: North
Season: Pagan – Winter / Esoteric – Winter
• Self: Body,
Jungian Function: Sensation
Body Part: Feet
Qabbalistic World: Assiah

Earth is seen as the material, the physical & the sensual. A Passive element, Earth allows growth & production; promotes prosperity; is the foundation on which anything is built.

Pentacles, represent all things material and physical, what you experience using your senses. They deal with your money, business deals, material possessions, your job, arts, crafts, your home & garden. Working hard & getting the job done are attributes of this suit. Pentacle people don’t mind getting their hands dirty whether that’s working with the land or in a factory. Strong & dependable, often found in the trades, removals, farming, landscaping & homemaking.

Keywords: sensual, sexual; strong; lithe; dependable; reliable; stoic; practical; skilled & skillful; artistic; common sense; traditional; regular; straightforward; grounded; sensible; lush; fertile; growth; luxury; wealth; prosperity; apprenticeships; scholarships; dull; dutiful; realistic; down-to-earth; materialistic; money motivated; domesticity; health & fitness; exercise.
Reversed: miserly; slave drivers; workaholics; pleasure seekers; neglectful; shoddy work; dullards; negative; pessimistic; superstitious; thoughtless; penny pinchers; lazy; unforgiving; selfish; greedy; covetous; moronic.

• King – Enjoys the good life (food, drink and leisure), financially secure; Reversed: Hoarder
• Queen – Healthy in body and finances, grounded and calm; Reversed: Unreasonable
• Knight – Cautious, sensible and slow to progress; Reversed: Inexperienced
• Page – Student, commitment to learning; Reversed: Rookie
• Ace of Pentacles – Financial reward, clarity of life purpose, goals; Reversed: Debt
• 2 – Balance, multitasking; Reversed: Impractical
• 3 – Meaningful work, enjoying one’s work, suitable career; Reversed: Mediocrity
• 4 – Hoarding, feeling poor, holding self-back out of fear; Reversed: Greed
• 5 – Minor money troubles, health problems, feeling like an outsider; Reversed: Helplessness
• 6 – Charity, accepting and giving help; Reversed: Cruelty
• 7 – Patience, waiting for your plans to bear fruit; Reversed: Unemployment
• 8 – Hard work, focused efforts, laying the groundwork; Reversed: Skill-shortage
• 9 – Luxury, rest, financial and material comforts; Reversed: Dependency
• 10 – Financial success, strong business relationships; Reversed: Restrictions

Moon Signs 3

Moon in Aries: You have instinctive reactions to people, and you immediately form your judgments. Your enthusiasm is easy to elicit, as is your anger. When you are in doubt, you immerse yourself in the activity. You are action-oriented, impetuous and determined, but you can also be selfish, irritable, impatient and abrupt. You make your needs known. When you were a child, your mother had to react to your impetuous demands. It was necessary. As a result, you have perceived him as a dynamic person. She taught you, for example, to be independent.

Moon in Taurus: On the emotional level, you are cautious, trustworthy and enjoyable. You react slowly, but once you have decided to devote yourself to something, it’s for the long run. You are stable, but obstinate. In case of doubt, you refuse to move in the least centimeter. But you suffer in times of change. When you were a child, you desperately sought the safety of a present and caring parent. It’s likely your mother tried to be that for you.

Moon in Gemini: You are fickle, agitated, dashing, and you have a clear speech. You express your feelings with spirit and intelligence. But you take a basically cerebral approach to your emotional problems. Though you tend to worry, analyzing your own reactions brings you a dose of calm, and you adapt easily to change. As a child, you were agitated, curious and easily distracted.

Moon in Cancer: The Moon governs the sign of Cancer, and therefore no matter what else happens in your card, you are a lunar person: changing mood, receptive, sentimental, and supremely conscious of the continual flow of your emotions. Tears coqme easily, and the past exercises a magnetic influence on you. You are probably very affectionate and remarkably committed to your loved ones.

Moon in Leo: The Moon in Leo adds heat, luster and exuberance to any solar sign. You consider yourself an outstanding number. Although your pride is easily crumpled, you are generally confident and happy. But when things do not go as you wish, you conceal the doubts you have about yourself and your ambivalence by a firework of emotions.

Moon in Virgo: Shy in terms of emotions, you prefer to repress them rather than express them. You try to be discreet, and you may find it difficult to cope with major problems. Instead, you divert your attention by focusing on details or working so hard that you barely have time to think. You are industrious, you have practical sense and you are helpful.

Moon in Libra: You are gracious, kind, romantic and diplomatic. You avoid vulgarity and try to express your feelings in a balanced and reasonable manner. Love and relational life are indispensable to your well-being, and you can barely imagine life without a partner. But you also enjoy serenity, and you will do what is necessary to achieve this elusive goal.

Moon in Scorpio: Passionate and easily crumpled, you are a complex person. Stubborn, intense, and sometimes self-destructive, you express your feelings indirectly and you often try to keep them secret, which may require a certain amount of manipulation. You avoid confrontation in terms of emotions: you feel that it is safer.

Moon in Sagittarius: You have a philosophic attitude, you are frank, cheerful and generous. Well-intentioned and idealistic, you are also a risk taker who depends on his independence and will do anything to preserve it. When a problem arises, you tend to look for rational explanations. It is easier for you to take action than emotions. You may believe that you are always right, even if it is not, which can inadvertently hurt you. But your optimism eventually comes back, and you embark on a new adventure.

Moon in Capricorn: You are stable, reserved and well disciplined. You know your limits. You may be pessimistic and sad because, in one way or another, the typical joy of childhood has passed you by. Reserved and complexed, you feel more stable and calm when you succeed. The exuberance of feelings and the dramas of other people make you anxious. But in times of crisis, you take responsibility. When you are in control, you experience a sense of authority and control that you try to maintain with great effort.

Moon in Aquarius: In the depths of yourself, you consider yourself a sort of Crusader or pillar of good works of charity. You like to think that you are able to make a difference in the world. Whatever else you see in your natal chart, you are attracted by what is original and non-conformist. It is difficult for you to express your emotions and you can give people the impression of being reserved. In reality, you do not know what to do with your feelings, and you are trying to pretend you do not.

Moon in Pisces: You are gentle, sentimental, influential and compassionate. But each emotional wave puts you down. Extremely sensitive and easily injured, you also possess a very fine intuition. When you act upon it, you are well. Although you may be dreamy and sometimes lack practical sense, it is imperative that you protect yourself emotionally.

Ok but can we talk about how the Paladin’s bayards don’t just suit them, but actually ARE them? THE BAYARD PICKS THE PALADIN, MR. POTTER.

The bayards are frankly the coolest metaphorical device happening in this show and I haven’t seen anyone talk about it yet (I’m sure someone has, but I feel like it’s not really… a thing??), and if my major has taught me any(useless)thing it’s to get stuck on functional motifs in storytelling so

Keith

I mean this is just fun. You’re probably not surprised that he gets the big blade because he’s main-character-red and the emo/possibly-Asian-one, but let’s consider a few things: 

The fact that it’s sharp on both sides acts as a physical reminder of the duality happening within his character (he cuts others down, but internally he’s cutting himself down just as much: a double-edged sword). 

Furthermore, that double edge reminds us that it’s a loner’s weapon: he needs to be able to attack with each swing, in any direction, because no one’s coming to back him up. It may be space, but dude is clearly rockin’ the lone wolf/samurai vibe. The length backs that up a bit as well–it keeps everyone he sees as an ‘enemy’ or a ‘rival’ at a distance (//side-eye @ lance). 

What’s even more interesting is that if you look at Keith’s relationship with his bayard compared to his Marmora blade, they represent his hidden and public selves: who people see him as/expect him to be vs. who he truly is and wants to be (is afraid to be) himself. 

Most people only see his bayard, a classic warrior/knight weapon that represents strength and grace and leadership. Keith brings this out in battle, in front of his friends, before enemies, etc. But when he’s alone at night or when he’s holed up in the desert, the blade on his mind and in his hand is his Marmora dagger. Despite being a secret for so long, it is actually this blade (and not the bayard he got from Voltron) which Keith always keeps close to him (and which he keeps strictly concealed). 

He covers up the mark on the hilt as if to cover his own hidden thoughts and feelings (and maybe even dubious past). In public, he feels he can proudly show his bayard but doesn’t want anyone to know he has the dagger, even before he himself knows what it might mean. 

Even more interestingly, this blade also represents close combat–letting people get close to you–and the desire to protect others, showing that these are things Keith thinks about, feels, and even wants, but is afraid to show to those around him. What’s more, while the obvious skills and general cool-dude-ness associated with the bayard are something Keith has earned/achieved by his own merit, the Marmora dagger (and all the things it represents) were something he was born with; something inherently part of him. Ironically, once Keith learns more about his dagger and what it represents, it becomes longer–it adds distance, just as the truth about his past puts distance between him and the other paladins.

Like, I could literally (gladly) write an entire essay just on the symbolism of how Keith treats these blades, but you get the idea. 

I was gonna do Shiro next but his is even sadder than Keith’s so let’s do

Pidge

So some things about this are obvious: it bears a (kind of adorable similarity) in shape to her head. It’s small, she’s small, but if you underestimate either of them you will be sorry. It’s an incredibly quick/nimble weapon (a great parallel for her stinging wit). Her bayard is designed for quick, surgically precise movements, which is exactly how Pidge works (both mentally and metaphorically).

However, while it has great attack capabilities, that’s clearly not the bayard’s (or Pidge’s) main purpose; it’s a necessary consequence in the pursuit of other goals. Rather, the transformative and flexible uses of Pidge’s bayard emphasize the desire to be useful and to solve problems over attacking. This is belied by the fact that Pidge forms Voltron’s shield. Pidge would much rather think her way out of/around a problem than charge in head-first

Her bayard is a reflection of that. Pidge’s bayard is also the most technically complicated, which is another great parallel for her mind. Furthermore, the grappling hook function of her bayard echoes her desire to find things out of reach, and cast out into space and bring those things close to her, or herself to them (*cough*MATT*cough*). 

TL;DR: it’s an all-purpose, unassuming weapon meant to perform multiple tasks in an efficient, creative way, and it focuses on problem solving/extraction more than brute attack (though it packs plenty of punch when cornered). And, of course, though she be but little, she is fierce.

Lance

As his swagger (and even his name, like talk about being on the nose) suggests, Lance is totally in-your-face, up-in-your-business blabbermouth who seems pretty simple to understand. So why does he have the weapon that arguably requires the most finesse, patience, and also has a long range? Because that’s what Lance is really like under all that talk. It may seem like Lance lives with the words “are we there yet” on his tongue, but consider this: Lance wanted to be a pilot, but was originally relegated to commercial-class ranks. Did that stop him? Nope. He kept at it until he made it to the top of those ranks (it’s safe to assume that if they only promoted one pilot to fighter-class after Keith’s expulsion, it would be the top of the commercial-class students). That’s more patience than any of the other paladins have shown.

As a gun in a team that has close-combat weapons, Lance’s bayard automatically assumes a supportive role (despite all his talk about beating Keith and being the best), and we see this multiple times throughout the show. His first day as a fighter-class pilot, what does Lance do? Talks to his team and says they should stick together. How does he find out about Shiro? He’s following Pidge and asking about what she’s up to–crazy theories that others wouldn’t care to hear out. There are a lot of other examples of this (notably, when he throws himself in front of Coran), but from the get-go we’re slyly shown that Lance actually cares about and pays attention to those around him (even though he keeps talking about kicking their butts and being #1). It makes sense, then, that his weapon would be one designed to support and provide cover for others. In fact, we see Lance doing exactly this in the first episode when Pidge mouths off and he rushes in to cover for her.

Sadly, as one of the longer-range weapons, Lance’s bayard is also one of the loneliest metaphors in the group, and we see the reason for this just as much in VLD: Lance doesn’t feel appreciated (or sometimes even accepted) by the people around him. He often feels distant, though not by choice. He may shoot (ha) his mouth off a lot, but at the end of the day it’s pretty apparent that this boy craves love and attention, almost as much as he wants to be perceived as a ‘top gun’ (double ha) within the group.

A gun–especially the rapid-fire type that Lance has–further mirrors his tendency to be impulsive (and even impetuous) rather than controlled and thoughtful. On the bright side, though, it is exactly that willingness to pull the trigger that has catapulted the gang forward on a number of occasions.

Shiro

Between Shiro’s arm and his bayard there are so many different things going on here I don’t even know how I can touch on all of them. If I could write an essay on Keith’s weapons, I could write a BOOK on Shiro’s.

First, let’s talk about Shiro’s actual bayard. In Zarkon’s hands, you can read this as a physical extension of Shiro’s freedom, or even as Shiro himself: Zarkon took the bayard–something meant to be used for good–from another world, and then warped it in the hopes of using it to cause destruction. 

The good news is that both Shiro and the bayard escape Zarkon’s clutches because of Voltron, and though Zarkon intended to use them, they instead become the strongest weapons to fight against him. They will always feel the effects of Zarkon’s influence and ownership–the bayard because of Zarkon’s former paladin connections, and Shiro because of his arm and PTSD–but they still fight. In the end, it is Zarkon’s obsession with them as his former ‘possessions’ that becomes his downfall. So deep is his trauma that Shiro actually waits until it looks like they’re about to die (when Voltron is in an electric headlock) to activate his bayard. Why? Because he doesn’t trust his arm, he doesn’t trust his hold on the bayard or the lion (don’t even get me STARTED on how the lion–down it’s right-hand weapon and still somewhat under Zarkon’s control–represents Shiro himself), and as a result he doesn’t trust himself to be stronger than Zarkon. 

Even when Shiro finally gets the bayard back, he doesn’t call it his bayard, or the black bayard; he calls it Zarkon’s bayard (and it looks the part). This can be seen as a mirror for how Shiro sees himself: even though it’s a bayard, Zarkon tainted it, and now it doesn’t belong to him even though it’s rightfully his and he has it in his hands (which, ironically, is still technically Zarkon’s hand… you get the picture).

However, as Keith corrects him (”you’ve got your bayard”), the bayard rejects the changes Zarkon forced upon it, and reverts to a form that matches Shiro and the other paladins (likely how it looked before Zarkon started using it for evil). Just as the paladins healed Shiro by rescuing him and making him part of Voltron, Shiro does the same for the black bayard. Indeed, he only pulls out the power necessary to retrieve the black bayard once he wakes up to find the team fighting to protect him. It might be telling symbolically that Shiro leaves his bayard behind when he goes missing at the end of the season–perhaps he’s won his freedom only to have it taken once again.

 Which leads me to… 

The black bayard could also represent Shiro’s memories: both are known to exist, and we get hints/flashes/teases throughout the show, but both are initially “lost”. Slowly, it is revealed just how both Shiro’s bayard and his memories have been taken/corrupted by Zarkon. We see this in the way Shiro’s memories haunt him, only to frustratingly elude  him when he needs them. When Shiro finally tries to find out more about why Zarkon has the bayard, he’s also facing his own mind–his memories, his insecurities, and his apprehension at what fate awaits him–as well.  In this sense, when Shiro reclaims the black bayard, he is also reclaiming so much more: the hold/fear Zarkon held over him, the insufficiency and anxiety he felt because of it, etc. 

You can also read the bayard as a mirror for Shiro’s arm: Zarkon took Shiro’s arm and replaced it with something Galran. Shiro joins Voltron only to find that Zarkon also has his metaphorical right hand–his weapon. Shiro can’t use the weapon he should be holding (in a hand he doesn’t have because of Zarkon) because Zarkon took it. Talk about a vicious cycle. This symbolism is supported all through season 1 and parts of season 2 where we see Shiro simultaneously struggle with controlling Zarkon’s lasting effects on Voltron and coming to grips (ha) with controlling his arm. It’s hinted–both during battle and through PTSD–that if Shiro doesn’t control his arm, it will control him, just as Zarkon demonstrates that if Shiro can’t reclaim the bayard, Zarkon will use it to kill him (we see a similar parallel with his memories). 

I’m just going to stop here because the black bayard and Shiro’s arm can represent so many different things that it totally distracts me and I can only really do it justice by literally sitting down and writing out a full on dissertation on it.

But TL;DR: Shiro’s arm and his bayard are in a crazy, soap-opera drama with Zarkon on so many different levels and it is symbolistically incredible.

Hunk

Hunk’s bayard, much like Hunk, is pretty straight-forward and simple. Physically, it’s a big weapon. A big, hulking (Hunking????) weapon. It looks incredibly imposing, but its chief function isn’t destruction, but preventing destruction. Just as Hunk likes to avoid violence, his canon is mostly used to disable enemy weapons as part of Voltron, and individually Hunk uses it to provide long-range cover fire for his team (when he tries to use it in a more actively combative role, he just ends up almost shooting Pidge… gg, Hunk). 

Unlike Lance’s more nimble and quick-fire weapon, Hunk’s takes a lot of strength to move around and a long time to power up–this mirrors Hunk’s own well-rooted stance (he’s not easily swayed), and his cautious nature. He doesn’t do things off-the-cuff or on a whim; he thinks them through first. Indeed, it’s almost always Hunk warning the others of the possible outcomes of their proposed escapades. 

He’s also slow to anger, just as his weapon is slow to fire. However, once he has decided to take a shot, his firepower is incredible, just as when he does decide to take action (like with the Balmerans), his will is unstoppable. 

I could go on for days, guys. I have so much stuff I had to cut out because even the hardcorest Voltron fans don’t care about underlying motifs this much, I know, but AGH. GUYS. GUYS. THE BEAUTY??? OF THIS WRITING??? IN A KIDS’ SHOW????? 

Bless.

PS this is long I didn’t proof read it SO SUE ME

I’m sure you already know about this Louisa May Alcott quote, but just in case: “I am more than half-persuaded that I am a man’s soul put by some freak of nature into a woman’s body … because I have fallen in love with so many pretty girls and never once the least bit with any man.”

//

EVEN WITH ALL THEIR SCIENCE THEY CAN’T EXPLAIN THIS

“What will you do with the lazy ones, who would not work?’

No one is lazy. They grow hopeless from the misery of their present existence, and give up. Under our order of things, every men would do the work he liked, and would have as much as his neighbor, so could not be unhappy and discouraged.”
― Emma Goldman

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I took my wife to her first NWSL game this weekend and the entire way home was spent excitedly plotting out a Supergirl Soccer AU. Below are the basics… ENJOY!

National City is home to many things:  The last daughter of Krypton, the headquarters of a prominent media conglomerate, a secretive government organization that monitors alien activity… and the best women’s soccer team in the United States.

Alex is largely oblivious, and doesn’t realize who exactly she’s dating when she starts seeing Maggie Sawyer, the captain of the National City team.  But superfans Winn Schott and Vasquez are there to let her know just exactly who she her new girlfriend is.

The team is rocked by accusations of nepotism when they recruit new goalkeeper Lena Luthor from the Metropolis team.  She wants to prove that she is the best - and far more than just the scion of Luthor Corp, corporate sponsors of the NCFC.

To distract from the scandal - and celebrate what makes National City special - team manager Lucy Lane proposes a shift in branding.  And so the team becomes the National City Supers.

Alex prods her sister into attending the first game as Supergirl, but nothing can prepare Kara for what she feels when she meets the impetuous goalie who puts so much passion and energy into every game.

timetravelturtle  asked:

Responding to your post about twist endings and Rod Serling: Do you think that the "No, Luke, I am your father" reveal in Empire Strikes Back works as a powerful twist? It's hard to view it as anything but obligatory after almost 40 years of references but at one point it was truly shocking, I think. Still, I'm not sure if the themes that the reveal serves are actually important to the work or if they just match the reveal.

Comparing the “I am your father” ending to the Twilight Zone/Scifi Proposition-Argument-Conclusion ending is like comparing a dolphin to a torpedo; they look the same, but they work in very different ways.

I think it’s important to emphasize here that the ending IS what your story is trying to say; the ending IS the story. If you have a story about the hazards of love that cynically shows how bad relationships can be…but the hero finds true love at the end, it’s an optimistic story that says true love and happiness is possible and relationships are great. The ending is what your story is trying to say.

Now, that said, the reason that the Darth Vader reveal has oomph can only be understood if you look at the Empire Strikes Back script by Lawrence Kasdan, who wrote maybe one of my favorite Westerns, Silverado (I love Westerns as much as scifi, but considering the nature of this blog, that part of my personality doesn’t come up much). It’s worth noting that most scifi writers have an understanding of the basics, something that transfers from genre to genre; the fundamentals of storytelling are the same. Rod Serling won Emmys for drama long before Twilight Zone, for instance.

You can understand what Empire Strikes back is all about from the title, which wasn’t carelessly chosen. It’s a story about how the Rebels are on the run; they are running in the night, and the wolves are after them. It’s impossible to stand and fight. The opening has the rebels in exile in a miserable icy location, from which they are forced to flee.

As the story goes on, things get worse and worse. The heroes are betrayed and have no place to hide. Luke does the impetuous yet loyal and courageous thing to help his friends before he’s ready, which the wise Yoda raises the stakes for by saying that Luke will fail totally if he confronts Darth Vader. The scene on Dagobah with Yoda and Obi-Wan fills us with dread for the meeting to come and raises the stakes for the battle to come; that’s the purpose of the scene.

Are you getting it, now? The point of the story is to have the Empire victorious, to show the sacrifice and loss a rebellion would need. And when Luke goes to see Vader, he has his hand chopped off and his lightsaber lost; he never stood a chance. And that, at the very conclusion of the film, is when the biggest bombshell of all is dropped: Darth Vader is Luke’s father.

The Darth Vader reveal wouldn’t have worked if it came in the middle of the film. It worked because the entire film had been building to it, with loss after loss to the Empire. It’s the ultimate thing to make a hero totally despair in a story that’s all about losing (note that after learning this Luke has no option but to jump to his death). The twist isn’t just thrown in there out of nowhere; the entire film had been building to it, and it’s the final “knockout punch.”

To have an ending like this, you have to identify what your story is about and what it’s trying to say, so you can convince the audience of it. As Brian McDonald says, “lots of young writers ask me if they are being too preachy. Not enough ask me if they are being sufficiently clear.” 

teach your girl to say no, to spit no like fire, to never apologize for it. her spine: NO. her fists: NO. her teeth all NO together.

but first and more importantly, teach your boy to see no, hear no, understand no before it’s spelled out for him. have him take “no” easily, not as an excuse to keep trying.

have him feel “no” like a change in the air so that he can infer it without so much as a word. don’t settle for no as just as the dictionary definition, show him no in body language, in “i’d rather not,” in “yes, but i’m drunk.”

teach him that “no” is not “convince me,” teach him to accept it gently, without violence, without feeling that he’s having something “denied” to him. “no” is not “take it from my fingers.” no is a shrug, is “i’m not sure,” no is a look, a scared smile, a terrified giggle. No is in the pocket of her clothes, no matter what they look like.

have him assume “no,” not “yes, unless otherwise stated.” girls are not swings on the playground, he cannot be upset when they don’t “share” themselves with him. there is no sharing, she is not an object. of a girl he sees on the street who doesn’t give him her number or react well to what he calls her: teach him she is not taking from him what is due, she is not denying him, she has never and will never belong to him. she will be his only after explicit and repeated consent and only by that alone. 

do me a favor

teach him no.

—  A GIRL NOT SAYING “NO” IS NOT A GIRL SAYING “YES” // r.i.d

Do you know why the Fair Folk take us? Why they are so intrigued by us?

Because we can die.

Our lives are defined by death. From our first breath, we rail against it, refusing to lay down and die. Our lives are a constant dance with it - some take up weapons and go forth to bring it, others tap-dance at its thresholds in the sky and deep waters, and still others strive against death itself. But in the end, we all go to death, whether it be calmly or in anger, and we weigh our life in tribute to ourselves. Death is our motive - we tell ourselves, when I am dead, what will be left of me? and craft wonders to answer that question. The wonders are left, even after we fade.

The Fair Folk cannot die. They do not feel the impetus to survive, to leave a legacy. They take us to taste our constant, exhilarating fear of death and joy of life, to sample our drives without meeting our ends. 

And this, too, is why iron burns them. When a star dies, the last atoms produced before the nova are iron. Iron is the death of a star, and its kiss shows them the truth - that one day, even that which does not live or die will go out…

…but the starstuff will continue into the skies forever.

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Okay but think about how PERFECT it is that Vex flew as a Red Dragon into the Dawn Father’s brazier. This is the form of her fears, of her hate, the form she chose all those years ago to direct her vengeance toward. It spurred her quest for knowledge and self-mastery. It was the impetus to hone her skills. It killed her mother, changed her life forever. She is the Dragon’s Bane and she flew as the manifestation of her first and most primal fear, wearing the scales of one of its lieutenants, into the heart of fire and came out the other side glowing I just can’t even begin to even. 

(ALSO CAN WE JUST TALK ABOUT HOW FAST SCANLAN REACTED. WITHOUT A SECOND’S HESITATION HE BELIEVED IN HER ABILITY TO DO THIS SHIT ON HER OWN SO MUCH THAT HE DUMPED HIS HIGHEST LEVEL SPELL INTO HER. I CANNOT BEGIN TO EVEN WITH THIS FUCKING SHOW.)

I just want to remind everybody

Leverage gave us a middle-aged couple who impetuously fell into bed and had hot passionate sex, then cleaned up their acts emotionally before committing to each other in marriage.

Leverage gave us a young black man gently, wisely courting a non-neurotypical blonde white woman.

Leverage gave us a young black man whose two white male best friends both describe him as the smartest man they’ve ever known.

Leverage gave us a guitar-playing country boy, an ex-hitman and army vet, who puts his life in the hands of a geeky black man and his blonde girlfriend (till death do them part).

Leverage gave us Parker, Sophie, Maggie, and Tara; it also gave us female villains with as much cunning, ruthlessness, and agency as any man’s. 

Leverage gave us villains who were rich, powerful, greedy white people who had to have just a little bit more, and a clever, cunning, usually compassionate, occasionally terrifying white guy who beat them at their own game and robbed the rich to help the poor.

Leverage, gentlefolx.

Something About a Dream

First off, thank you to the many comments I’ve received about the series so far. It makes me feel amazing, and keeps me wanting to post, so thank you again. Second off, I already know where I am going with them, but, if you want, let me know what more you want to see as they grow. x

You can find the past parts here.

To put it simply, Harry was distraught.

He imagined the first time seeing you naked to be some life changing experience, and for the most part he was right, but he envisioned it to be more on the romantic side, with his naked form hovering above you as he reaches into his bedside table for a condom, not when he scampers into his bedroom to find a pair a socks, only to be met with your naked figure bent over to retrieve the towel that had fallen to a heap at your feet – but nothing ever goes the way he wants them to.

Ever.

For all the times he’s spent his mornings with a hand wrapped around his cock envisioning you rocking greedily against him, back arched and your nails digging into his thigh, he realizes you’re just as flawless as he daydreamed, even if he only got a few second glimpses before he stumbled out of the doorway, not even a peep leaving his lips.

Now, he was expected to share breakfast with the image of your bare arse forever etched in his head.

Keep reading

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Poll reveals Trump’s presidency might just make America’s Democrats great again

  • Spurred by Trump, Democrats say they plan to step up their political involvement over the next year, according to a Washington Post poll.
  • More than a third of registered Democrats say they will increase their political involvement in 2017. 
  • That’s more than the 21% of Republicans and 21% of independents who say they will increase their involvement this year, according to the survey.
  • The impetus for the bump is in large part thanks to Democratic women and younger Democrats between 18 and 49, who said they “plan to become more involved in political causes in the next year,” the poll reported. Read more
Once Upon a Time bosses unveil plans for season 7

Warning: This story contains major spoilers from the season finale of Once Upon a Time. Read at your own risk!

The Final Battle led to a lot of loss during Sunday’s two-hour season finale of Once Upon a Time.

After the curse hit, Henry (Jared Gilmore) found himself in a Black Fairy (Jaime Murray) run Storybrooke where Emma (Jennifer Morrison) was locked up in a mental hospital, unaware she’s the savior and refusing to believe in fairy tales.

It turns out, the Final Battle is not an actual fight, but a battle for Emma’s soul. The Black Fairy hopes to crush Emma’s belief, thus causing all the realms in Fairy Tale Land to crumble and disappear — and she nearly achieves her goal, too. Though Emma initially returned to her old life in Boston, Henry was able to convince his mother to return, saving everyone’s lives.

But it’s Rumple (Robert Carlyle) who actually breaks the curse. Furious that the Black Fairy imprisoned Belle (Emilie de Ravin), Rumple killed his mother, thus ending her spell, returning Emma’s memory and bringing everyone home to Storybrooke. Unfortunately, the Black Fairy had already commanded Gideon (Giles Matthey) to kill Emma. Instead of fighting back, Emma decides to sacrifice herself rather than kill an innocent. But, in a scene echoing the season 1 finale, Henry’s kiss resurrects Emma.

Though the storybook was burned, it reconstitutes and subsequently ends. Yes, it’s the end of this book, but not their story. Everyone gets to keep living happily ever after together. And yet, in a flash to the future that echoes the pilot, a young girl named Lucy (Alison Fernandez) shows up at an adult Henry’s (Andrew J. West) door, exclaiming that his family needs his help. She’s the same little girl whom an adult Henry in the Enchanted Forest employed to protect the storybook when a darkness came for him in what turned out to be a flash forward. What does this mean?! EW turned to executive producers Adam Horowitz and Edward Kitsis to find out.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Many of the cast we’ve known over the last six seasons are not returning. Can you talk about how the story will be changing moving forward?
ADAM HOROWITZ: Just on a conceptional level, it’s the same show. We’re trying to tell the same kind of stories and honor the DNA of what Once Upon a Time was from the very start. But I think we — Eddy and I — felt that as we approached season 6, the time had come to close the chapter on a lot of the stories we had been telling, which was the impetus behind this season finale, and open some new chapters. While there are some characters returning and some not returning, it’s still the same universe, and it’s still the same kind of storytelling. It’s just that we’re going to be coming at it from a little bit of a different angle. It’s not going to be necessarily Storybrooke-based.
EDWARD KITSIS: Also, what we see is, a new hero is leading us into a new world, which is an adult Henry Mills. We saw that in what we realize are flash forwards, and then at the very end, Henry has grown up and he looks like he left home. He was an Author writing everyone else’s story, so to me it looks like he left home to find his own story and then something happened, and now he’s got to be the hero.
HOROWITZ: It’s a little bit of the continuity between the two iterations of the show, which is Henry. Henry has been the heart of the show from the beginning. Jared was amazing, and we couldn’t love him move; watching him grow up has been amazing. Now, we’re going to see what that character becomes in a 10-years-older version. But he’s still going to be that character and still carry that essence of the show and be the center of the family that’s at the heart of the show.

You gave so much closure to so many stories, how do you plan to reconcile that with some people returning next year but not others? Does that change their happy endings?
KITSIS: What happened to these people, those are episodes, those are things we will probably want to show. For us, we felt creatively it was time to end a lot of these stories. What we’re really interested in is, as we said, it’s like a new book. So we’re starting with new stories. Although it’s going to have some of the people that we’ve loved for six years at the center of it, we are going to meet new people and new worlds.

Will we see an influx of new characters and other fairy tales? How will you branch out in that sense?
HOROWITZ: Hopefully when you see the premiere, that will become super clear, so we don’t want to give too much away right now other than to say we do intend to branch out, we do intend to also stay with some of the characters we’ve been with. It’s about how do you honor everything that’s come before, but also widen the canvas a little bit?
KITSIS: Open the world up.
HOROWITZ: That’s the goal of season 7. In addition to the people that we’ve already announced who are coming back as regulars, and who are not, there will be more regulars we’re adding to the mix.
KITSIS: As we completed one journey, what we want to do next year is take people on another one. The DNA is still the same, which is fairy tale characters in the real world in search of hope. We still have Henry, we still have Regina, we still have Hook and we still have Rumple, and we still have people are that are going to come in and out that we know, but we’re going to meet a whole new universe and a new group of people. So for us as writers, we’re also excited to do that. Probably you’re going to see a world with no magic in it on one side, very similar to the way we did in season 1.

Thematically, what are you hoping to explore that’s different than what the first six seasons were?
KITSIS: We always say that Emma was a character looking for her family and finding hope. I would say that Henry was the heart of the truest believer, and what we saw at the very end is he no longer believes. Henry’s loss in faith and the idea of belief is the jumping off point. The DNA of the show remains, and always will be, of hope. Each character was always looking for their happy ending, and that is no different than anyone in the real world.
HOROWITZ: One of the hardest times to have hope in anyone’s life is when you’ve lost belief or faith in something. That is a jumping off point for where we are for the next season, which is, how do you deal with questioning faith and belief and finding hope again?

This scene with adult Henry echoes the pilot, even down to Henry saying he doesn’t have a kid. Has something happened to him in terms of his memories or has he just become cynical somehow seemingly being separated from his family?  
HOROWTIZ: These are excellent questions that might be better answered—
KITSIS: —in the teaser of next year.
HOROWITZ: But they’re excellent and insightful questions.

Is the storybook that Henry charged his daughter with protecting in the Enchanted Forest the book we’ve always known, or a book with brand new stories within?
HOROWITZ: It’s another excellent question, and without getting too specific about what that book we saw in the teaser is really about, what we can say is that Henry has grown up, he has remained true to what we’ve established and he is an Author.

Let’s talk about Lucy. Who is her mother? Is it Violet?
HOROWITZ: Violet is in the montage at the end. When Henry goes to school, she’s waiting for him at the school.
KITSIS: But that being said, unfortunately like a lot of us, your first love in high school ends up not being the person you marry. You end up leaving home and moving on. It is not Violet. Who the mother is, and who Henry fell in love with, is one of the things we’re really excited about next year. In the tradition of Snow and Charming, Henry and his wife are a very much Once epic romance.

Is there a Savior in this story?
KITSIS: There could be.
HOROWITZ: There very well could be.

Can you talk at all about this new darkness coming after adult Henry that we saw in the Enchanted Forest? Is this the introduction of the new antagonist for next season?
HOROWITZ: It is. It looked pretty scary, so I don’t think it’s a new friend-tagonist. What we see in the season finale in those little snippets is, it’s a darkness that grown-up Henry has to deal with and has a big impact on what’s going on in season 7. We’re still at that we need to be slightly infuriatingly vague stage.

Since the show is going to be centered partially around Regina next year, what can you say about her drive or her story going into next season?
KITSIS: I’d say she’s fighting for the people, just like a queen does.

The Evil Queen seems to be marrying Robin Hood. Will she play a role next season since Lana is sticking around?
HOROWITZ: I would say, never say never.

Rumple seemed to get his happy ending with his family, but what do you plan to explore with him next season? The darkness is still inside and he’s just killed his own mother, so how has that changed him?
KITSIS: We saw his happy ending with Belle, and they worked really hard to get it. What’s happening next in his life and what he’s going through is obviously what the story is. That one I don’t want to just fully tease yet. All this stuff is literally just being worked on.
HOROWITZ: We really would love for the audience to be able to spend the summer living with the happiness that we’ve seen these characters get, because it’s real, and it’s meant to be real. It’s not meant to be something that we’re doing that we want to destroy and make all horrible, or whatever. We want these characters to have really earned this place of happiness they’ve found. But because we’re telling stories, we’re going to have issues to overcome in the future, and Rumple is no exception to that rule. To tell you now what it is would give away so much, so we’d rather have the audience really sit with what we’ve left them with for now.

Because you see Emma get her happy ending, and we know that Jennifer is only returning for one episode, a lot of fans are worried Emma is going to die. Do you want to say anything to the audience?
KITSIS: Not really. There’s nothing to say. That is correct, she is coming back for an episode. Their happiness is real, and people should enjoy that. The thing is this: Right now, we’re not trying to take away the show we’ve done for six years, and we’re not trying to destroy people’s happiness right now, but we’re going to be telling a new version. But until they see that, they won’t understand what it is. So for us, we’d rather not whip people into a frenzy.
HOROWITZ: I’d like to underscore that for a second: Really we wanted the audience to not think about what we’re doing as throwing away what came before, but building on and expanding from it, so that what happened and what they’ve lived with and what they’ve invested in all these years still really matters; it matters to us as writers and we know it matters to so much of the audience. We want them to know that we do really respect that and we really do approach the story from that level. We’re not just clearing a playing field and starting over willy-nilly. We’re trying to tell these new stories and expand our canvas, but also honor what’s come before.

Hook’s always walked a fine line of giving into his darker instincts over the years. Is that something you might delve into again moving forward?
KITSIS: That’s definitely a part of his DNA, but we’re hoping to tell new avenues of story for the characters. The lessons they’ve learned on the show, like we don’t want another year of Regina wondering whether or not she should be evil; that’s been settled. When the dwarves bow to her, they bow to her as the queen. She’s no longer the Evil Queen. So we want our characters to move forward. But like any of us, once you get a hold of one issue, there’s always three others.

Can you talk about how you’ll be handling flashbacks next year?
HOROWITZ: We do intend to keep a flashback component to the show and we hope that how we do it is fun for the audience.

Now that you have this new direction, do you have a better sense of your endgame?
HOROWITZ: Our goal with the show remains the same, is the simplest way to put it. It’s that question you always get asked, which is, “Do you know exactly what the end is going to be?”
KITSIS: We knew for this chapter, we have ideas and we are creating a new chapter. We’ll see how that goes. We’re excited about the new journey. We think it’s very much Once Upon a Time. At the same respect, we are excited that we got to see those happy moments from our characters in the finale and really build to that.

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