immigration issues

shows on netflix u should definitely be watching
  • Crazy-Ex Girlfriend - ITS A COMEDY MUSICAL, GUYS, CREATED BY RACHEL BLOOM (who won a golden globe?? YES HER). get to the 3rd episode at least. there’s an OPENLY BISEXUAL CHARACTER (later on in the season) and its such a good representation of love & what it actually is and growing up and letting go?? such a good show
  • BoJack Horseman - just a really, really good & cleverly written show about an anthropomorphic horse. 7000% animal puns. 5000% describes exactly how u feel about life and sadness.
  • Jane the Virgin - CUTE!! mock telenovela that deals with lots of social issues, like immigration, etc (the last episode i watched had the narrator checking every scene for the bechdel test omg) ALSO, arrested development level narration, fam, get on this. gina rodriguez will slay ur ass
  • Bob’s Burgers - such a good lil family show about a burger joint. watch this when you need to laugh or just to lift ur spirits. also, we are all either gene, louise, or tina. don’t lie
  • Master of None - aziz ansari’s show. each episode is basically a lil movie. the love story is ridiculously cute and it talks on some subjects rlly well
  • Jessica Jones - !!!!!!! if you haven’t seen this, GET ON IT. esp. if you’re a girl, cause this is SUCH A RELATABLE SHOW FOR WOMEN. grizzled neo-noir female detective? SIGN ME THE FUCK UP. also, watch daredevil if u wanna be caught up for Marvel’s Defenders, which is gonna be sofuckinggood
  • Sense8 - HOW HAS NOBODY SEEN THIS ONE? god, it’s so good. it’s got some problems but overall it does well @ showing other cultures and also some kickass sequences and wow main the characters interacting is just A1
  • It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia/The League - this is. so funny. get past the 1st season and its such a good garbage show. the characters are such assholes, dude. they’re horrible. super dark humor, only watch if ur into that/ funny show abt a fantasy football league. both garbage shows and i love them w all my heart
  • Arrested Development - just in case u haven’t seen the best show ever written. basis of basically every comedy show u love. watch.
  • The Office - how have u not binged the office?? binge the office.
  • Comedy Specials - comedy specials are an UNTAPPED GOLDMINE on netflix. some of my fave comedians are John Mulaney, Bo Burnham, Ali Wong, Chelsea Peretti, Donald Glover, Jim Gaffigan, and Aziz Ansari.

BONUS - non-netflix shows u should also be watching

  • You’re The Worst - messed up characters and darkkk dry humor, but the second season does such an EXCELLENT job at portraying depression!! also, a dysfunctional relationship that is not necessarily unhealthy (sometimes, tho, sometimes)
  • Community - ONE OF MY FAVORITE SHOWS. Gets emotional so quickly. S1-3 are some of the best moments on television. skip S4. S5-6 are good but S1-3 are amazing. characters will become all of ur faves
  • Westworld - my expectations for this show were sky-high and it has oNLY PROVED THEM RIGHT! half sci-fi, half western fantasy VR, all badass. i have no idea what’s going on and i love it. literally Robots With Anxiety #relatable

pls add to this if you have any great shows, and i’ll update this list whenever i find something else wonderful that i don’t hear people talking about

Female Korean-American Teenager

Hi, I’m Caroline, and as the title states, I’m a female Korean-American teen currently living in a town that’s 80% white. The majority of East Asians living here are Japanese, and over the years, there have been a few sprinklings of new Korean or Chinese families moving in. For the most part, however, my family was the only Korean family in town when we first came here. This heavily impacted my childhood - made me ashamed of my culture and ethnicity - and of course, the racism that I constantly faced from classmates, parents, teachers, and sometimes even friends, was exhausting. 

It means so much to me to see Korean-American characters - or any person of color, really - be represented in today’s books, TV shows, movies, etc. For once, I’d like to see fully-fleshed out, complex characters who are people of color - not just the 2D stereotypes that too many forms of media put them out to be. So if a few more writers out there become less ignorant due to this post, I’ll be forever grateful. 

So. Let’s do this thing!

Beauty Standards 

Most East Asians represented in today’s media have extremely straight, practically black hair. And while it’s true that straight, black hair is the most common trait regarding hair amongst Koreans, there are (*gasp*) a few of us with curly hair, too. (Moi.) To the Koreans I knew, anyways, my hair was always an object of envy. I’d frequently be asked if I got the perm, and whenever I said I had naturally curly hair, there’d be a lot of “oh, how lucky"s going around. That made me feel pretty special, only it’d last for a short while before the reality of living in a mostly-white neighborhood kicked in, where my curly hair was usually made fun of. (Usually saying that Asians don’t have curly hair. Whatever. On the whole scale of racist comments I’ve been sent, the one about my hair is the least bothersome. When I was a kid, it bothered me a lot, though, and I think to some extent, it still bothers me at least a teeny bit - I actually started to straighten my hair when I went into eighth grade. Yup, give me the Hypocrite of the Year Award. I still need some adjustments.) 

Amongst Koreans, there’s also a lot of emphasis on having a small face, long and skinny legs, a fairly short torso…essentially, Koreans thrive for the typical European figure. Koreans, however, have pretty round faces, short and stalky legs, and long torsos for the most part. (With the exception of a few - and of course, the option for plastic surgery is always out there. I shit you not, almost every Korean woman I know have at least either (a) known someone who went through plastic surgery or (b) have been in plastic surgery myself. It’s a big deal in South Korea. My grandma had surgery done to her eyes twice, my mom’s friend had surgery done to her nose and her eyes, and my aunt’s brother is actually a plastic surgeon who does operations a number of times a day.) 

Clothing 

Growing up, I wore the typical American clothing - except for on special occasions, like my first birthday or New Year’s. On those days, I’d wear a hanbok, which is a traditional Korean gown with lots of colors and embroidery. The men would wear traditional clothing as well, and it’s customary for Koreans to wear these especially on New Year’s. Now, since my brothers and I have outgrown our hanboks, we just stick to American clothes on New Year’s. 

Daily Struggles 

Though I tell all my white friends and classmates that my first language is English, my first language was actually Korean. I don’t say that my first language is Korean anymore because firstly, I don’t want people to think of me as someone who only speaks Korean and secondly, I don’t know how to speak Korean anymore. It’s sad, really, because I can understand Korean much better than my siblings and my cousins, and there are moments when I can almost remember a phrase, but as of now, speaking the language is an extreme difficulty and embarrassment to me, especially when I’m surrounded by elders. (And usually, the only things I can say to them are ‘hello’ and ‘thank you’ and ‘goodbye’.) It’s frustrating to speak to older Koreans and know exactly what they’re saying but only being able to respond in English. 

That being said, growing up, I often had to translate - more specifically, re-translate - for my mother, who didn’t know English at all when I was a child. She used to feel incredibly lonely for it, and often times, she’d feel frustrated and cry about how all of the white mothers acted like she was an idiot for not knowing English. As an extreme social butterfly, this really hurt my mother, and it hurt her even more when her own children were starting to distance themselves because of the language barrier. I remember having to sit with my mother on the couch and help her learn English - and it was, to be honest, one of the saddest experiences I’ve ever had to go through. She’d grow frustrated with herself, and she’d hate every bit of it, I could tell, but she kept going because she wanted to be there for her kids. (She eventually got her American citizenship, too, but by doing so, she had to give up her Korean citizenship. Most East Asian countries don’t allow dual citizenships.) And though I don’t speak Korean anymore, I actually continue to re-translate things for my mother - in other words, I just have to simplify the English a little bit to get her to understand what someone else is saying. (This method works for anyone else who is struggling with English. Simplify the words, that’s all - but don’t treat the person with disrespect.) 

And, of course, there’s the very exhausting series of questions that come with being Korean. The most annoying and frustrating are (but not limited to) - 

  • “Oh, so are you South Korean or North Korean?” (Bruh. If I was North Korean, there’s a VERY slim chance I’d be in America right now. I’d still be stuck in North Korea, wouldn’t I?) 
  • “But what’s your nationality?” (American.) “No, I mean your REAL nationality.“ 
  • “What are you? Japanese? Chinese? Vietnamese?” (For some reason, NO ONE GUESSES KOREAN.) 
  • “Wow, your English is great!” (???) 
  • “English is your best subject? Wait, then what about math?” (…) 
  • “I bet you’re super smart!” (…I study hard, yeah, but that has nothing to do with the fact that I’m Korean.) 
  • “Oh, my God, Koreans are SO hot.” (Ew. Times a thousand.) 

Dating and Relationships 

My parents are pretty strict about my nonexistent love life. If my dad had it his way, I wouldn’t be allowed to date until I’m out of college. But for real talk, my mom’s actually the one who’s much pickier on who I date. She told me since I was a kid that it’d be best for me to date (and marry) another Korean-American. She means this out of the goodness of her heart - mostly that she wants me to marry someone who I can connect with culturally. (“Regular Koreans will be too grounded into Korea. You need someone with similar experiences.”) My dad just doesn’t want me to date anyone Japanese - and while I find this wrong, it’s mostly due to the bad blood between Korea and Japan. (World War II, the Korean War, comfort women, etc.) 

And because of this prejudice against Japanese people, my dad always found it difficult to accept that I had a few Japanese friends. He often wanted me to stray away from other Eastern-Asians in general, American or not. (Unless, of course, it was for dating/marrying.) This was because he didn’t want me to become a part of “THAT Asian group”, which, let me just say, is pretty sad, because when there’s a group of white kids hanging around, no one finds it strange. When there’s a big group of x friends of x race, it’s suddenly SUCH an odd sight. 

Food 

This is where I try to restrain myself for real. 

The most common foods you’ll find at a Korean dinner table are rice, kimchi (which is basically spicy pickled cabbage - lots of Koreans eat it, but I personally never did. And I still don’t. Oops), kim (pronounced keem - basically roasted and dried, slightly salted seaweed strips. Which are really good), along with a number of side-dishes and maybe one big, main dish. (Mostly meat.) 

Favorite Korean dishes include

  • seolleongtang, a lightly salted broth with oxtail meat, or sometimes some other kind of meat. There’s usually a sprinkling of scallions, and rice or noodles can be served inside. 
  • kalbi, the famous Korean BBQ. Just imagine meat being prepared directly in front of you served with veggies. Delicious, but be warned - your burps will stink - and I mean stink - afterwards. Its variant, kalbi jim, are slow-cooked short ribs served often with Korean-style steamed potatoes and carrots. Just as good. 
  • tangsuyuk, sweet and sour (mostly sweet, I think, anyways,) pork. The pork is covered with a batter that is fried and then typically dunked in sweet sauce. Some people like to have the sauce on the side so they can dip it in - and still save the crunch. It’s a personal preference. 
  • buchimgae, otherwise known as Kimchi Pancakes. Korean pancakes are not your typical breakfast pancakes. They’re made in a pan, like regular breakfast pancakes, but inside, there’s an assortment of seafood, veggies, and in this version, kimchi. (There are spicy and non-spicy versions). 
  • tteokbokki, spicy rice cakes. Very chewy and again, pretty spicy. 

Favorite Korean sweets/desserts/snacks include 

  • tteok, sweet rice cakes. There are many different kinds of rice cake, usually with flavors of classical red bean or green tea. The favorite of many children is the classical rainbow tteok, where the rice cakes are dyed with strips of green, pink, and yellow. The flavor of plain tteok is actually not too sweet, but it’s still a very classic, very traditional and cultural Korean dessert that cannot be skipped over. 
  • yakbap, a very special type of sweet rice cake all on its own. This is a favorite amongst many, and the rice is prepared in a way that it’s sticky and brown. Pine nuts, chestnuts, and jujubes as well as raisins are mixed in. 
  • patbingsu, a frozen dessert. Think of an evolved form of shave ice with toppings like red bean paste, nuts, and fruit. Extremely popular in South Korea, not to mention one of its most iconic desserts. 
  • saeoosnek, shrimp-flavored crackers. Again, a very popular snack that’s exactly what it sounds like. Crackers. With. Shrimp. Flavoring. 
  • choco pie, a popular chocolate-marshmallow cake that looks similar to America’s moon pie. Extremely popular amongst children. 

Holidays 

In my family, we never celebrated the direct Korean celebrations, but we always celebrated the Korean New Year the traditional way. Again, usually dressed in hanbok, children (and parents) would bow down to the oldest members of the family and pay their respects with a traditional phrase. They also have to perform a special bow three times while saying this phrase. (There are two different bows - one for men, one for women.) Once doing so, the elder usually gives a blessing to the family members and presents them with an envelope of money, very similar to the traditional Chinese red envelope they receive on their New Year’s celebration. 

Another traditional Korean celebration my family - and many other Korean families, I’m sure - celebrate is the 100 Days birthday. 

A brief history lesson - back when Korea was suffering due to the economy failing, it was a rare occurrence to ever see a child live past one hundred days. Once one hundred days had passed, then the family would rejoice and throw a large celebration, inviting friends, extended family members. There’d be lots of food and laughter and different rituals all dedicated to the child. Now, of course, Korea’s economic situation is not the same as it was back then, but we still hold these celebrations for tradition and cultural reasons. 

One of the most important rituals in the 100 Days birthday is sitting the baby down in front of a variety of items - usually a coin, a pen, a length of twine, a book, food, and sometimes other variants of those items. If the child picks up a coin, then it is to be predicted that this child will live a wealthy life. If the child picks up a pen or a book, then it is to be predicted that this child will grow to become a scholar. If the child picks up food, then it is to be predicted that this child will never go hungry. If the child picks up the length of twine (or sometimes string or a spool of thread), then it is to be predicted that this child will live a long life. Some families believe in this, others don’t, but either way, this ritual is performed because hey, tradition! (And besides, it makes for pretty cute pictures.) 

Home/Family Life 

Korean families and Korean home-life, I feel, will always have a different atmosphere from white families. Most Korean parents are very reserved when it comes to public displays of affection for their children, though like all families, this can vary. Independence and learning how to grow an outer shell is very important to the Korean lifestyle. This doesn’t mean that Korean parents don’t love their children - of course they do, and again, all Korean families work differently. However, this pattern and discipline is a common thing to find in most Korean families. 

There’s a certain emphasis on studying - and no, not all Korean parents are super strict about grades and threaten to beat their children if they get a B on a report card. (At least, my parents didn’t.) However, education is still considered a top priority. Studying is encouraged, and most Korean parents want to see their children secure a good job (ie doctor, lawyer, engineer, etc). Most of the time, Korean parents just want to see their children live a secured life. That’s it. At least, with my parents, everything they ever taught me or told me had something to do with me learning to survive when I become older. I used to resent this when I was a kid, but now that I’ve grown more mature, I actually find myself appreciating everything my parents have ever taught me. 

Another note - when a Korean woman marries, she is cut off from her birth family and is considered to only be a part of her husband’s family. This limits her visits to her own birth family - and though this was a common thing before, I believe many Korean families don’t operate the same way anymore. (Some traditions last longer than others.) 

Elders are respected. Period. Even if s/he’s getting on your nerves, you ALWAYS RESPECT THE ELDERS. 

Shoes are taken off before entering a house. No exceptions to this rule. If you wanna impress your Korean friend, take off your damn shoes. This will be appreciated. 

Things I’d like to see less of. 

  • people thinking that “all Koreans get hot when they’re older”. (FETISHIZATION IS A BIG NO-NO.)
  • Koreans being seen as submissive and docile creatures. (Note how I said creatures and not humans. Because that’s how some people treat Koreans and other East Asians. Like we’re creatures, rather than actual human beings.) 
  • Koreans being seen as kickass ninjas. (It’s either docile creatures or kickass ninjas. There’s never a line between the two, and it’s exhausting.) 
  • “Koreans are so romantic!” (Sorry, that’s the K-drama binge talking. If anything, Koreans are pretty reserved when it comes to PDA and again, affection in general. Of course, I can’t speak for all Koreans, but at least with my family, PDA was always kept to a minimum. Usually a quick peck on the lips, kisses on the cheek, hand-holding, etc. Never an actual full kiss in public. Forget about make-out sessions.) 
  • Stone-cold Koreans. (Again, there’s either the romantic Korean or the Terminator Korean. Never an in-between. Yes, keep in mind that due to cultural reasons, Koreans don’t typically display affection. THAT DOES NOT MEAN THAT WE DON’T DISPLAY EMOTIONS.) 
  • Straight-A Koreans. Typically good at math and science. (While yes, many East Asian countries and families put emphasis on these subjects, not all Koreans happen to be extreme nerds who cry at a B on a report card. Example A - I happen to stink at math. And I know many other Asian-Americans who also stink at math. So.) 
  • Assuming Korean parents are abusive. (While there are many abusive Korean parents out there, people need to stop assuming that right off the bat. Stop. It’s extremely disrespectful, not to mention just wrong?!) 

Things i’d like to see more of. 

  • complex, well-rounded Korean characters. (Give me a Korean character who hates math but still tries to do well in class. Give me a Korean character who’s bisexual and surrounded by loving family members. Give me a Korean character who likes roller-skating and getting high in the bathroom stalls and sings Jackson 5 all day. Give me a Korean character who goes out to be homecoming queen and buffs her nails while fighting demons. Give me a Korean character who cries, laughs, talks, breathes, LIVES like an actual human being, and you’ll get the respect of hundreds - maybe thousands - of readers and viewers who’ve been waiting for so long to be properly represented.) 

WHY JANE THE VIRGIN MAKES ME HAPPY:

  • NEARLY ALL THE MAIN CAST ARE LATINA/POC AND/OR WOMEN
  • THE FAMILY DYNAMIC BETWEEN THE  VILLANUEVA WOMEN IS SO SUPPORTIVE AND STRONG AND CUTE AND WARM
  • THE NARRATOR IS HILARIOUS AND WOKE AF (”OCCUPATION: WHITE PRIVILEGE”)
  • DEALS WITH ISSUES OF IMMIGRANTS AND WHITE WASHING
  • GINA RODRIGUEZ 
  • SINCE THE MAIN THEME OF THE SHOW IS ABSTINENCE, ALL ROMANTIC RELATIONSHIPS FOCUS MORE ON EMOTION AND DYNAMIC
  • THE WOMEN DRIVE THE PLOT AND ARE NEVER BELITTLED OR OBJECTIFIED 
  • THE SHOW DEALS WITH REAL ISSUES OF RELIGION AND FAITH AND PREGNANCY AND PREJUDICE AGAINST NEW MOTHERS
  • GINA RODRIGUEZ 
  • ALL THE CHARACTERS ARE MULTIDIMENSIONAL AND SUPPORTIVE LIKE THERE IS NO TOXIC MASCULLINITY 
  • THE PRODUCTION DESIGN IS COLORFUL AND BRIGHT
  • IT’S JUST SUCH A HAPPY NICE SHOW OKAY I LOVE IT SO MUCH
npr.org
CHARTS: Here's What Donald Trump Has Said On The Issues
NPR examined what the president-elect has said about the 10 issues voters care most about.

Before Donald Trump takes the oath of office in January, there are a lot of questions about how he will decide key policy issues.

We’ve identified the top 10 issues voters care about most according to a 2016 survey from the Pew Research Center and charted what Trump has said about each of them. The issues are, in order: the economy, terrorism, foreign policy, health care, gun policy, immigration, Social Security, education, Supreme Court appointments and the treatment of racial and ethnic minorities.

It’s going to be a very, very anxious-ridden time. Two of the issues that I’m most concerned about are [global warming], which these guys are all denying, and the immigration issue. (…) We’re going to have to say, ‘You cannot do this over us. You’re going to have to go through us, around us, under us. We’re not going to give these people up without a fight.’ Every single one of the people they’re trying to deport is one of us, and we’re not going to give them up. We belong to a very, very exclusive club. It’s called the United States. And the dues are very, very high. And sometimes the leadership does not represent the core values of most of the members of that club. But we don’t withdraw. We try to change the thinking of those in power, and if that doesn’t work, then we change those in power. We’re still part of this. We cannot divest ourselves. This man is reflecting a part of our culture that the majority of us do not recognize and do not share. We don’t approve of tyrants and bullies, but we’re stuck with one now, and now our real character is going to show up. We can’t sit back, We can’t not get involved. We have to get more and more and more involved. And we have to allow ourselves to be taken to the best part of ourselves, and it’s gonna be costly. But that’s what it means to belong to this very exclusive club.
—  Martin Sheen on Donald Trump: ‘God forgive us, but we just elected a tyrant’
The Future Is Going To Be Nasty....

Gear up my nasty ladies and bad hombres. Less than a year until we start talking midterms. If we can organize and get out the vote in midterms we can take back the Senate or the House. Stopping Trump from a dangerous agenda becomes much easier if we control one or both of the houses of Congress.

But it WON’T HAPPEN if no one votes. We lost it in 2012 and failed to win it back in 2016. In 2018 don’t let it fall further into the hands of people who want to:
Cut your healthcare
Cut Medicare
Privatize social security
Repeal laws about global warming
Privatize and/or drill in National Parks
Ban Muslims
Deport immigrants
Refuse to invest in clean energy
Take away women’s rights to their bodies
Refuse gun reform

I could go on and on.

Stay indignant. Stay kind… but stay indignant. Stay motivated.

Organize, educate, and vote in 2018

4

My thoughts exactly on this election in tweets…
Native people
Black people
Latinx people
Asian people
Muslims
Immigrants
LGBTQA+ community
Women
Disabled people
Victims of sexual assault
People who struggle with mental illness

I’m sorry. I love you. I’m standing with you. We’re still fighting the good fight.

huffingtonpost.com
4 LGBTQ FAQs For The Coming Trumpocalypse
Let’s address four of the most common questions.

“Welcome to 2017! As the LGBT community girds ourselves for life in Trumplandia, let’s address four of the most common questions I’m seeing: Marriage Equality, Immigration, Transgender issues, and Parents.”

Read the questions and answers here

bzfd.it
Jeff Sessions Unlikely To Face GOP Opposition In The Senate
Senate Republicans are rallying around their colleague's appointment to Attorney General and even those who have major differences with Sessions say they plan to vote for his confirmation.
By Tarini Parti

Senate Republicans are coalescing around their colleague Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions’ nomination to serve as attorney general — three decades after Session’s past racist comments sunk his nomination to the federal bench under a GOP-controlled Senate.

Sessions’ nomination was announced by President-elect Donald Trump’s transition team Friday morning. He needs a simple majority of the Senate to be confirmed. With Republicans’ narrow majority in the Senate, there’s little room for defectors.

So far, even senators who strongly oppose Sessions views on key issues, including immigration and the criminal justice system, plan to vote ‘yes’ on the nomination. Sessions fought hard against the Senate’s bipartisan comprehensive immigration reform bill in 2013 and has opposed bipartisan efforts to reduce mandatory minimum prison sentences.

6

This November I’m voting for an issue that is very personal to me - Immigration rights. I was born in Cuba, I’m Cuban-Mexican. I came to America when I was 6 or 7 years old, I came over here with my mom. My dad came over a year later. As an immigrant, I know the struggle and I know the importance of this election and these laws that affect us and everybody in our country, but especially Latinos. This country was founded by immigrants, that’s what makes this country great. If you haven’t already, please register and make your voice heard.

on the topic of finding mexican/latino accents (when speaking english) “funny”

when we are making jokes within our communities about our accents, which totally happens all the time,

(there are many examples-a few off the top of my head:  the whole #estarguars; when televisión mexicana shows skits of ppl mispronouncing words, george lopez comedy skits, or us making fun of how el chapo pronounced sean penn, SO MANY examples lol)

it is different from when someone outside a latino community, (be them white or of any other ethnicity) makes fun of us. it is ok for our own communities to find humor in our experiences and ways of being. but when it is a white-dominated media world that is making fun of our accents, that is what is so damaging

Because jokes about our accents have been used to justify the dehumanization and exploitation of latino communities as a primary labor force in the United States for DECADES

Racist humor has a purpose, it isn’t just racist for racism’s sake. when non-latinos make fun of our accents they are perpetuating a system that thrives off of latinos’ percieved “unintelligence.” Because this has historically allowed, and continues to allow, stereotypes to ensure that mexicans/latinos be percieved and treated as unintelligent, that the jobs that the poor take on (like fast food, cleaning) are not due to exploitation and also not the result of international policies, but rather that the people doing those jobs are so “lazy, dumb, can’t speak english therefore not smart, unmotivated” and that is why they don’t deserve a living wage, or they don’t deserve healthcare or “welfare” etc etc

p.s.

this dates all the way back to white power structures (in regarding mexican immigration) implemented after 1848 when the U.S. absorbed mexican people living on their newly acquired territories as citizens of U.S. after the “treaty of guadalupe- hidalgo” that ultimately robbed the mexican government of half its land

The fact that immigration is the issue that won it for Trump reveals the blatant racism and xenophobia in this country. For decades America opened up its borders to attract and invite the best minds and most ambitious people in the world of all nations, and it was literally the strategy our public leaders developed to defeat the USSR in the Cold War, and it fucking worked because race isn’t real and because stealing the kind of people who figure out how to move countries and start new lives to build their own futures from scratch are the kind of people we should seek out. And it is why for decades America has been the best nation and everyone has been learning English and basing the world’s economy on the US dollar and watching our movies and listening to our music and copying our culture. Trump is singlehandedly reversing by being everything about America that the rest of the world loathes.
—  Levi Olson

i guess civil rights aren’t “issues that matter” and i guess there aren’t other things at stake in this country than just what system of health care we have and whether or not we have free college. as if criminal justice reform (something booker is passionate about) isn’t an “issue that matters”. this is bullshit.

if straight white men could stop pretending that political opinions are somehow completely divorced from a person’s values and character, that would be great.

“you’re just gonna cut somebody off over politics?” 

are you really gonna sit there and pretend that things like the ACA and immigration issues aren’t actual fucking life-and-death issues for some people? are you gonna sit there and pretend that voting for someone like Trump says nothing about who you are as a person? are you gonna sit there and act like i’m being petty by not wanting people in my life if they endorse racism, or at the very least, don’t believe it’s a big enough problem to keep you out of the white house? 

so, yes, i absolutely will cut people out of my life over “politics.” fuck off.