immigration & customs enforcement

npr.org
U.S. Citizen Who Was Held By ICE For 3 Years Denied Compensation By Appeals Court
Davino Watson was imprisoned as a deportable immigrant for 1,273 days, despite having U.S. citizenship. Now a court says he is not eligible for $82,500 in damages he was awarded.

After Davino Watson was released, he filed a complaint. Last year, a district judge in New York awarded him $82,500 in damages, citing “regrettable failures of the government.”

On Monday, an appeals court ruled that Watson, now 32, is not eligible for any of that money — because while his case is “disturbing,” the statute of limitations actually expired while he was still in ICE custody without a lawyer.

latimes.com
Motel 6 routinely gave guests' information to immigration officials, Washington attorney general says
Washington state's attorney general is suing Motel 6, saying the budget hotel chain disclosed the personal information of thousands of guests to federal immigration authorities in violation of state law.
By Matt Pearce

Washington’s state attorney general sued Motel 6 on Wednesday, accusing the hotel chain of illegally giving information on thousands of guests to immigration enforcement officials who did not have warrants and who scrutinized guests with Latino-sounding names.

Motel 6 has faced scrutiny since September, when a Phoenix publication uncovered evidence that two Arizona locations had been regularly handing over guests’ information to Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents who were on the lookout for immigrants staying in the country illegally.  Motel 6 — which has more than 1,400 locations across North America — disavowed the practice and said the information exchange was limited to “the local level without the knowledge of senior management.”

But on Wednesday, Atty. Gen. Bob Ferguson of Washington said his office launched its own investigation after the revelations in Arizona and discovered that “disturbing and unlawful” handovers were also routine at several corporate-owned Motel 6 locations in Washington state — suggesting the practice was more widespread than the company had contended.

“It was not isolated to two motels in Phoenix, not by a long shot. The company’s actions were methodical. They trained their new employees on how to do this,” Ferguson said. “We’re going to find out who at Motel 6 knew what, and when they knew it.”

He said the names of “many thousands” of Washington residents and visitors staying at Motel 6 had been turned over to the federal government “without their knowledge, without their consent.” Ferguson said Motel 6 staffers told investigators that “the ICE agents circled any Latino or Latina-sounding names on the guest registry, and returned to their vehicles” to run background checks.

Ferguson’s lawsuit, filed in King County Superior Court in Seattle, accuses Motel 6 of unfair and deceptive business practices and of violating Washington state privacy laws. It also alleges discrimination based on nationality. The complaint asks for a permanent injunction forbidding the company from continuing the practice and for civil penalties and attorney fees.

In a statement, Motel 6 said it had ordered its locations in September not to hand over lists of residents to ICE without a warrant.

Tim Warden-Hertz, directing attorney of the Tacoma, Wash., office of the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project, a nonprofit advocacy group, called the attorney general’s allegations “incredibly problematic” both for immigrants and on a personal level.

“When I go to the hotel, or when I pick up the phone, I don’t expect that that information is going to be handed over to the government,” Warden-Hertz said. “For a business to do this to their own customers is sort of baffling, and certainly I think should make people think twice about where they take their own business.”

Motel 6 Gave Guest Information To Immigration Agents, Lawsuit Says

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson sued Motel 6 on Wednesday, alleging motel employees gave private information on thousands of guests to U.S. immigration authorities.

Ferguson told reporters that employees of the national budget chain divulged the names, birth dates, driver’s license numbers, license-plate numbers and room numbers of more than 9,000 guests to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents. The agents did not have warrants.

The lawsuit, filed in King County Superior Court, said the motel employees’ actions — all in the Puget Sound region and at corporate-owned properties — violated state consumer-protection law.

Washington’s Supreme Court established that guest-registry information is private, Ferguson said, and Motel 6 violated the law each time it gave out private information.

The Associated Press reports:

“In September, Motel 6 issued a directive to every one of our more than 1,400 locations, making it clear that they are prohibited from voluntarily providing daily guests lists to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE),” the company said in an emailed statement.

“Motel 6 takes this matter very seriously, and we have and will continue to fully cooperate with the Office of the State Attorney General,” the company added.“

The attorney general’s office in Washington began investigating after news reports out of Arizona said that Motel 6 workers at two Phoenix locations provided guest information to immigration agents.

Continue reading

For anyone keeping score at home...

Unfilled positions in the Trump administration (Total: 114):

–State Department:

  • Under Secretary for Management
  • Assistant Secretary for Legislative Affairs
  • Assitant Secretary for European/Eurasian Affairs
  • Under Secretary for Arms Control/International Security Affairs
  • Under Scretary for Political Affairs
  • Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy
  • Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights
  • Under Secretary for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment
  • Assistant Secretary for Intelligence and Research
  • Assistant Secretary for Near Eastern Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary for Diplomatic Security
  • Assistant Secretary for African Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary for East Asian and Pacific Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary for Economic and Business Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary for Educational and Cultural Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary for International Organizational Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary for International Security and Non-proliferation
  • Assistant Secretary for Population, Refugees, and Mirgration
  • Assistant Secretary for Verification and Compliance
  • Assistant Secretary for Western Hemisphere Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor
  • Assistant Secretary for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary for South Asian Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary for Political-Military Affairs

–Defense:

  • Under Secretary for Intelligence
  • Under Secretary for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics
  • Assistant Secretary for Special Ops and Low Intensity Conflict
  • Assistant Secretary for Legislative Affairs
  • Under Secretary for Personnel and Readiness
  • Assitant Secretary for Nuclear, Chemical, and Biological Defense
  • Under Secretary for Policy
  • Assitant Secretary for Acquisition
  • Assistant Secretary for Research and Engineering
  • Assistant Secretary for Strategy, Plans, and Capabilities
  • Assistant Secretary for Manpower and Reserve Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary for Health Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary for Asian and Pacific Security Affairs

–Commerce:

  • Deputy Secretary
  • Under Secretary for Economic Affairs
  • Under Secretary for International Trade
  • Assistant Secretary for Legislative and Intergovernmental Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary for Communications and Information
  • Under Secretary for Industry and Security
  • Assistant Secretary for Export and Administration
  • Assistant Secretary for Global Markets
  • Under Secretary for Oceans and Atmosphere
  • Under Secretary for Standards and Technology
  • Under Secretary for Intellectual Property
  • Assistant Secretary for Administration
  • Assistant Secretary for Export Enforcement
  • Assistant Secretary for Economic Development
  • Assistant Secretary for Enforcement and Compliance
  • Assistant Secretary for Industry and Analysis
  • Assistant Secretary for Oceans and Atmosphere
  • Assistant Secretary for Environmental Observation and Prediction

–Treasury:

  • Deputy Secretary
  • Under Secretary for International Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary for Financial Institutions
  • Assistant Secretary for Legislative Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary for Intelligence and Analysis
  • Assistant Secretary for International Finance
  • Assistant Secretary for International Markets and Development
  • Assistant Secretary for Tax Policy
  • Under secretary for Domestic Finance
  • Assistant Secretary for Financial Markets
  • Assistant Secretary for Economic Policy
  • Assistant Secretary for Financial Stability

–Justice:

  • Assistant Attorney General for Legal Counsel
  • Assistant Attorney General for Legislative Affairs
  • Assistant Attorney General for General Criminal Division
  • Assistant Attorney General for Legal Policy
  • Assistant Attorney General for Antitrust
  • Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights
  • Assistant Attorney General for Environment and Natural Resources
  • Assistant Attorney General for National Security
  • Assistant Attorney General for Civil Division
  • Assistant Attorney General for Tax Division
  • Assistant Attorney General for Justice Programs

–Agriculture:

  • Deputy Secretary
  • Under Secretary for Research, Education, and Economics
  • Under Secretary for Rural Development
  • Under Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs
  • Under Secretary for Food Nutrition and Consumer Services
  • Under Secretary for Farm and Foreign Agricultural Services
  • Under Secretary for Natural Resources and Environment
  • Assistant Secretary for Administration
  • Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
  • Assistant Secretary for Congressional Relations

–Energy:

  • Deputy Secretary
  • Under Secretary for Management and Performance
  • Under Secretary for Science
  • Under Secretary for Nuclear Security
  • Assistant Secretary for International Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management
  • Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability
  • Assistant Secretary for Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
  • Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy
  • Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy

–Education:

  • Deputy Secretary
  • Assistant Secretary for Legislation and Congressional Affairs
  • Under Secretary
  • Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
  • Assistant Secretary for Elementary and Secondary Education
  • Assistant Secretary for Post-Secondary Education
  • Assistant Secretary for Special Ed. and Rehab. Services
  • Assistant Secretary for Career, Technical, and Adult Education
  • Assistant Secretary for Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development
  • Assistant Secretary for Communications and Outreach

–Labor:

  • Deputy Secretary
  • Assistant Secretary for Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management
  • Assistant Secretary for Policy
  • Assistant Secretary for Employment and Training
  • Assistant Secretary for Employee Benefits Security
  • Assistant Secretary for Mine Safety and Health
  • Assistant Secretary for Occupational Safety and Health
  • Assistant Secretary for Veterans Employment and Training
  • Assistant Secretary for Disability Employment Policy

–EPA:

  • Deputy Administrator
  • Assistant Administrator for Enforcement and Compliance Assurance
  • Assistant Administrator for Administration and Resources Management
  • Assistant Administrator for Environment Information
  • Assistant Administrator for International Affairs
  • Assistant Administrator for Water
  • Assistant Administrator for Solid Waste and Emergency Response
  • Assistant Administrator for Air and Radiation 
  • Assistant Administrator for Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention
  • Assistant Administrator for Research and Development

–Housing and Urban Development:

  • Deputy Secretary
  • Assistant Secretary for Community Planning and Development
  • Assistant Secretary for Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity
  • Assistant Secretary for Congressional and Intergovernmental Relations
  • Assistant Secretary for Administration
  • Assistant Secretary for Housing
  • Assistant Secretary for Policy Development and Research
  • Assistant Secretary for Public and Indian Housing

–Health and Human Services:

  • Deputy Secretary
  • Assistant Secretary for Financial Resources
  • Assistant Secretary for Aging
  • Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evalutaion
  • Assistant Secretary for Health
  • Assistant Secretary for Children and Families
  • Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response
  • Assistant Secretary for Legislation

–Interior:

  • Deputy Secretary
  • Assistant Secretary for Policy, Management, and Budget
  • Assistant Secretary for Insular Areas
  • Assistant Secretary for Land and Minerals Management
  • Assistant Secretary for Fish, Wildlife, and PArks
  • Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary for Water and Science
  • Solicitor

–Homeland Security:

  • Under Secretary for Management
  • Under Secretary for Intelligence and Analysis
  • Assistant Secretary for Transportation Security Administration
  • Under Secretary for National Protection and Programs Directorate
  • Under Secretary for Science and Technology
  • Assistant Secretary for Immigration and Customs Enforcement
  • Assistant Secretary for Policy

–Veterans Affairs:

  • Deputy Secretary
  • Assistant Secretary for Congressional and Lesgilative Affairs
  • Under Secretary for Benefits
  • Under Secretary for Health
  • Under Secretary for Memorial Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary for Information and Technology
  • Assistant Secretary for Policy and Planning

–Transportations:

  • Under Secretary for Policy
  • Assistant Secretary for Governmental Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary for Aviation and International Affairs
  • Assistant Secretary for Budget and Programs
  • Assistant Secretary for Tranportation Policy
  • Assistant Secretary for Research and Technology

–Executive Office of the President:

  • Deputy Director/Office of Management and Budget

–Small Business Administration:

  • Deputy Administrator

–Director of National Intelligence:

  • Principal Deputy Director

Source:

cnn.com
There is an underground network preparing to hide immigrants
Faith leaders in California don't have hope President Donald Trump won't enter churches or places of worship where immigrants may seek sanctuary. So they are building safe houses and preparing rooms to hide immigrants who fear ICE will deport them.
By Kyung Lah, Alberto Moya and Mallory Simon, CNN

A hammer pounds away in the living room of a middle class home. A sanding machine smoothes the grain of the wood floor in the dining room.

But this home Pastor Ada Valiente is showing off in Los Angeles, with its refurbished floors, is no ordinary home.

“It would be three families we host here,” Valiente says.

By “host,” she means provide refuge to people who may be sought by US Immigration and Customs Enforcement, known as ICE. The families staying here would be undocumented immigrants, fearing an ICE raid and possible deportation.

The purchase of this home is part of a network formed by Los Angeles religious leaders across faiths in the wake of Donald Trump’s election. The intent is to shelter hundreds, possibly thousands of undocumented people in safe houses across Southern California.

The goal is to offer another sanctuary beyond religious buildings or schools, ones that require federal authorities to obtain warrants before entering the homes.

“That’s what we need to do as a community to keep families together,” Valiente says.

At another Los Angeles neighborhood miles away, a Jewish man shows off a sparsely decorated spare bedroom in his home. White sheets on the bed and the clean, adjacent full bathroom bear all the markers of an impending visit. The man, who asked not to be identified, pictures an undocumented woman and her children who may find refuge in his home someday.

The man says he’s never been in trouble before and has difficulty picturing that moment. But he’s well educated and understands the Fourth Amendment, which gives people the right to be secure in their homes, against unreasonable searches and seizures. He’s pictured the moment if ICE were to knock on his door.

“I definitely won’t let them in. That’s our legal right,” he says. “If they have a warrant, then they can come in. I can imagine that could be scary, but I feel the consequences of being passive in this moment is a little scary.”

washingtonpost.com
Two Rockville High students arrested for allegedly raping classmate at school
A 14-year-old girl was raped in a bathroom stall during the school day, police charge.
By https://www.facebook.com/DanMorseWriter

Police arrested two ninth-graders, Henry E. Sanchez, 18, and Jose O. Montano, 17, who appeared in court Friday and were ordered held without bond.

Sanchez, a native of Guatemala who arrived in the United States about seven months ago, has a pending “alien removal” case against him, court officials said Friday.

Montano has been in the United States for about eight months, MacVittie said. Details about Sanchez’s removal case, or Montano’s immigration status, couldn’t immediately be learned Friday.

Gboyinde Onijala, a schools spokeswoman, said she could not comment on why Sanchez and Montano are only in ninth grade.

TRUTH:  Public schools are prohibited from asking legal status upon enrollment.  Public schools DO NOT do criminal background checks upon enrollment.  Public schools get funding for the number of butts in the seats.  Feel safe?

Federal Judge Blocks U.S. Deportation Of Iraqis Nationwide

A district court judge in Michigan has blocked Immigration and Customs Enforcement from deporting any Iraqi national from the U.S. to Iraq for at least two weeks, expanding an order that initially applied only to immigrants in the Detroit area.

U.S. District Court Judge Mark Goldsmith ruled late Monday that more than 1,400 Iraqis at risk of being deported from the U.S. could face “grave consequences” if they’re forced to return to their native country — and that the potential for irreparable harm outweighs the government’s interest in their immediate removal.

Goldsmith, who was named to the bench by President Obama in 2010, added, “the public interest is served by assuring that habeas rights are not lost before this Court can assess whether it has jurisdiction in this case.”

Continue reading

cnn.com
There is an underground network readying homes to hide undocumented immigrants
Faith leaders in California don't have hope President Donald Trump won't enter churches or places of worship where immigrants may seek sanctuary. So they are building safe houses and preparing rooms to hide immigrants who fear ICE will deport them.
By Kyung Lah, Alberto Moya and Mallory Simon, CNN

“A hammer pounds away in the living room of a middle class home. A sanding machine smoothes the grain of the wood floor in the dining room.

But this home Pastor Ada Valiente is showing off in Los Angeles, with its refurbished floors, is no ordinary home.“It would be three families we host here,” Valiente says.By “host,” she means provide refuge to people who may be sought by US Immigration and Customs Enforcement, known as ICE. The families staying here would be undocumented immigrants, fearing an ICE raid and possible deportation.

The purchase of this home is part of a network formed by Los Angeles religious leaders across faiths in the wake of Donald Trump’s election. The intent is to shelter hundreds, possibly thousands of undocumented people in safe houses across Southern California.

Workers rush to finish flooring for homes meant to hide immigrants.The goal is to offer another sanctuary beyond religious buildings or schools, ones that require federal authorities to obtain warrants before entering the homes.“That’s what we need to do as a community to keep families together,” Valiente says.

At another Los Angeles neighborhood miles away, a Jewish man shows off a sparsely decorated spare bedroom in his home. White sheets on the bed and the clean, adjacent full bathroom bear all the markers of an impending visit. The man, who asked not to be identified, pictures an undocumented woman and her children who may find refuge in his home someday.The man says he’s never been in trouble before and has difficulty picturing that moment. But he’s well educated and understands the Fourth Amendment, which gives people the right to be secure in their homes, against unreasonable searches and seizures. He’s pictured the moment if ICE were to knock on his door.“I definitely won’t let them in. That’s our legal right,” he says. “If they have a warrant, then they can come in. I can imagine that could be scary, but I feel the consequences of being passive in this moment is a little scary.”

Read the full piece here

npr.org
U.S. Citizen Who Was Held By ICE For 3 Years Denied Compensation By Appeals Court
Davino Watson was imprisoned as a deportable immigrant for 1,273 days, despite having U.S. citizenship. Now a court says he is not eligible for $82,500 in damages he was awarded.

Davino Watson is a New Yorker, a U.S. citizen. But ICE didn’t believe him, held him for 3 years, then released him with no explanation in rural Alabama. A judge awarded him $82,500, citing “regrettable failures of the government.” Now an appeals court says he can’t have the money — because the statute of limitations ran out while he was in custody.

Still, Immigration and Customs Enforcement kept Watson imprisoned as a deportable alien for nearly 3 ½ years. Then it released Watson, who was from New York, in rural Alabama with no money and no explanation. Deportation proceedings continued for another year.

Watson was correct all along: He was a U.S. citizen. After he was released, he filed a complaint. Last year, a district judge in New York awarded him $82,500 in damages, citing “regrettable failures of the government.”

On Monday, an appeals court ruled that Watson, now 32, is not eligible for any of that money — because while his case is “disturbing,” the statute of limitations actually expired while he was still in ICE custody without a lawyer.

The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals acknowledged that the ruling is “harsh” but said it was bound by precedent.

“There is no doubt that the government botched the investigation into Watson’s assertion of citizenship, and that as a result a U.S. citizen was held for years in immigration detention and was nearly deported,” the court ruled. “Nonetheless, we must conclude that Watson is not entitled to damages from the government.”

1. As a public school teacher I know that schools DO NOT check legal status nor do they do a criminal background check.

2. These bad dudes (17 and 18) were placed in 9th grade likely because they had zero credits just like regular freshmen.

3. I’d bet the school provided some sort of Special Education services, which the school receives extra money for having on their roster.

4. Schools get money for butts in the seats, they do not check if the 18-year-old-dude-who-doesn’t-speak-English-that-is-sitting-next-to-your-14-year-old-daughter is a criminal.

buzzfeed.com
Authorities release Rosa Maria Hernandez, the 10-year old girl with cerebral palsy the Border Patrol detained at the hospital
But deportation hearings still await Rosa Maria Hernandez after 10 days in custody.
By Adolfo Flores

Adolfo Flores at BuzzFeed News: 

Federal authorities on Friday released a 10-year-old undocumented girl whom Border Patrol agents had detained at a Texas hospital after a surgery.

Rosa Maria Hernandez was released days after the ACLU filed a federal lawsuit demanding she be freed. The girl, who was recovering from gallbladder surgery, was released to her parents in Laredo, Texas while her deportation case is still pending.

“Finally, Rosa Maria has been released to her family where she belongs. This young girl and her loved ones have been through a traumatizing ordeal,” said Texas Rep. Joaquin Castro. “The United States should not be a place where children seeking life-sustaining medical care are at risk of apprehension.”

Michael Tan, a staff attorney with the ACLU’s Immigrants’ Rights Project, said he was relieved Rosa Maria was going home after 10 days of detention.

“She’s going back home to where she should’ve been all along, not government custody,” Tan told BuzzFeed News.

At the same time, Tan said, he’s worried that US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and Customs and Border Protection (CBP) will feel comfortable going after vulnerable groups of people like a 10-year-old girl seeking medical attention.

“I’m concerned that we have folks on top telling ICE, telling CBP, the gloves are off and they should feel free and unleashed to do what they want to the immigrant community and that there are no consequences for targeting a child at a hospital,” Tan said. “It’s terrifying for immigrants and people of color who don’t know whether they should be looking over their shoulder the next time they go to a hospital.”

Rosa Maria was being transported from Laredo, Texas, to Corpus Christi on Oct. 24 via ambulance when she passed through an immigration checkpoint.

Border Patrol agents allowed her through with a cousin, a US citizen who was accompanying her, but followed the ambulance to Driscoll Children’s Hospital.

Border Patrol agents stood outside the girl’s hospital room the entire time she was there, her mother, Felipa De La Cruz, said. Once the hospital released her, Rosa Maria was taken into custody and put in immigration proceedings.

“We all agree on the need to secure the border, and to punish the employers who choose to hire illegal immigrants.  Those who enter the country illegally and those who employ them disrespect the rule of law, and they are showing disregard for those who are following the law. We simply cannot allow people to pour into the United States undetected, undocumented, unchecked, and circumventing the line of people who are waiting diligently, patiently and lawfully to become immigrants.” - Barack H. Obama

Originally posted by usedpimpa

All Americans, not only in the States most heavily affected but in every place in this country, are rightly disturbed by the large numbers of illegal aliens entering our country. The jobs they hold might otherwise be held by citizens or legal immigrants. The public service they use impose burdens on our taxpayers.

That’s why our administration has moved aggressively to secure our borders more by hiring a record number of new border guards, by deporting twice as many criminal aliens as ever before, by cracking down on illegal hiring, by barring welfare benefits to illegal aliens. In the budget I will present to you, we will try to do more to speed the deportation of illegal aliens who are arrested for crimes, to better identify illegal aliens in the workplace as recommended by the commission headed by former Congresswoman Barbara Jordan.

We are a nation of immigrants. But we are also a nation of laws. It is wrong and ultimately self-defeating for a nation of immigrants to permit the kind of abuse of our immigration laws we have seen in recent years, and we must do more to stop it.” - President Bill Clinton

Originally posted by tvneon