imaging library

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Hyundai Card’s Library Project

The three projects are facilities dedicated to the members of the HYUNDAI CARD, in Seoul, South Korea. Each library an oasis in the city with a different theme: travel, design and music.

  • Music Library + Understage in Hannam-dong by Ga.A Architects (images 01-04)
  • Design Library in Gahoe-dong by One O One Architects (images 05-07)
  • Travel Library in Cheongdam-dong by Wonderwall (images 08-10)

Follow the Source Link for images sources and more information. 

Seven Years of Tracking the Solar Cycle

Our sun is ever-changing, and a satellite called the Solar Dynamics Observatory has a front-row seat. 

On February 11, 2010, we launched the Solar Dynamics Observatory, also known as SDO. SDO keeps a constant eye on the sun, helping us track everything from sunspots to solar flares to other types of space weather that can have an impact on Earth.

After seven years in space, SDO has had a chance to do what few other satellites have been able to do – watch the sun for the majority of a solar cycle in 11 types of light.

The sun’s activity rises and falls in a pattern that lasts about 11 years on average. This is called the solar cycle.

Solar activity can influence Earth. For instance, it’s behind one of Earth’s most dazzling natural events – the aurora.

One of the most common triggers of the aurora is a type of space weather called a coronal mass ejection, which is a billion-ton cloud of magnetic solar material expelled into space at around a million miles an hour. 

When these clouds collide with Earth’s magnetic field, they can rattle it, sending particles down into the atmosphere and triggering the auroras. These events can also cause satellite damage and power grid strain in extreme cases. 

The sun is in a declining activity phase, so coronal mass ejections will be less common over the next few years, as will another one of the main indicators of solar activity – sunspots.

Sunspots are created by twisted knots of magnetic field. Solar material in these tangled regions is slightly cooler than the surrounding areas, making them appear dark in visible light.

The tangled magnetic field that creates sunspots also causes most solar activity, so more sunspots means more solar activity, and vice versa. Humans have been able to track the solar cycle by counting sunspots since the 17th century.  

Image: Houghton Library, Harvard University, *IC6.G1333.613ia

The peak of the sun’s activity for this cycle, called solar maximum, was in 2014. 

Now, we’re heading towards the lowest solar activity for this solar cycle, also known as solar minimum. As solar activity declines, the number of sunspots decreases. We sometimes go several days without a single visible sunspot.

But there’s much more to the story than sunspots – SDO also watches the sun in a type of light called extreme ultraviolet. This type of light is invisible to human eyes and is blocked by our atmosphere, so we can only see the sun this way with satellites.

Extreme ultraviolet light reveals different layers of the sun’s atmosphere, helping scientists connect the dots between the sunspots that appear in visible light and the space weather that impacts us here on Earth.

SDO keeps an eye on the sun 24/7, and you can see near real-time images of the sun in 11 types of light at sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/data.

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“Goodness is not goodness that seeks advantage. Good is good in the final hour, in the deepest pit without hope, without witness, without reward. Virtue is only virtue in extremis. This is what he believes, and this is the reason, above all, I love him.”

[Gifset: 1 - The Veritas in the Haereticum. 2 - Bill Pott’s hand dissolving into pixels, revealing the truth about her world. 3 - The Doctor reminding himself of another truth, of virtue in extremis. 4 - River Song’s diary in the Library. The words “So what is the title?” - “Literally ‘the truth’ “ are written across the two library images.]

((under readmore is some real time gifs of a jotaro from sketch to shading! it’s not quite a tutorial i guess bc he is,, in summary a guy with strong eyebrows, jawline, hair hat, cheekbones and sharp eyes that you will get better at drawing after a few times… referencing canon will help a lot)) 

((thanks! I’m not sure, it depends on the dude, I start all my drawings with a circle for the head and keep adding and removing stuff until it looks like the guy? reference if it looks weird, doing art studies of ppl will build up good image library to base off shapes on)) 

Keep reading

Just yesterday I got this tattoo of my dog Scout. 😍

Currently: Digital Imaging Technician, Flaxman Library, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago; Academic Library; Illinois

Soon: National Digital Stewardship Resident of Art, Philadelphia Museum of Art; Art Museum/Museum Art Library & Archives; Pennsylvania

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yo I feel like im dreamin right now! I couldn’t even remember the name of this book not 2 months ago and something clicked recently that helped me remember the name and with the help of some one donating i found it on ebay for the low, used but pristine condition, hard cover!

let me tell you about this book: i wasn’t even a teen yet when i got my hands on this book so the internet wasn’t even prevalent like that nor was google. this was in the time of search up the damn physical directory yaself, you want images? go to the library or read the book especially if are poor, and im poor so that’s always been my go-to. it was where I met with this book called ‘Discovering The Wonders Of Our World’ and it cemented itself into my life and memory like nothing else.


imagine my predicament here to truly appreciate my appreciation for this book. young ass black kid with clinical depression and anxiety just got took from beautiful Dominican Rep/ Quisqueya unwillingly kicking and screaming to ugly ass NYC, poor as fuck, access to hardly anything, exacerbating the illnesses already there. where to go when sociopolitical climate of then and now tore up communities like mine? shiiiit the books! by chance (I think), i found this book int he library when I was a kid and borrowed it, “forgot” to give it back and it was mine forever… presumably.. until I lost it some years later while moving to a new apartment. never to be seen again. forgotten even. and now it’s back here with me ready to be appreciated in a new light. good god this feel so good! it left such a mark on me that I can still remember some of the images and names of the places decades later.

Firearms safety is key for people who use weapons at work or for recreational shooting. But one risk has been little acknowledged: Lead dust exposure.

In a standard bullet, a solid lead core wrapped in a copper jacket sits atop a stack of gunpowder and lead primer. When the gun fires, the primer ignites, the gunpowder lights, and some of the lead on the bullet boils. When the casing snaps out of the ejection port, lead particles trail behind it. As the bullet hurtles down the barrel of the gun, a shower of lead particles follows.

If a gun range isn’t ventilated well, lead dust collects on shooters’ clothing and hands and lingers in the air, where it can be inhaled. The more people shoot, the greater the risk of being exposed to dangerous amounts of lead. It becomes an occupational hazard for weapons instructors, police and defense personnel.

Lead Dust From Firearms Can Pose A Silent Health Risk

Photo: Herra Kuulapaa Precires/Science Photo Library/Getty Images