imaging library

Fall in love and stay in love. Explode. Don’t intellectualize. Get passionate about ideas. Cram your head full of images. Stay in the library. Stay off the internet and all that crap. Read all the great books. Read all the great poetry. See all the great films. Fill your life with metaphors. And then explode.
—  Ray Bradbury • Conversations With Ray Bradbury
Seven Years of Tracking the Solar Cycle

Our sun is ever-changing, and a satellite called the Solar Dynamics Observatory has a front-row seat. 

On February 11, 2010, we launched the Solar Dynamics Observatory, also known as SDO. SDO keeps a constant eye on the sun, helping us track everything from sunspots to solar flares to other types of space weather that can have an impact on Earth.

After seven years in space, SDO has had a chance to do what few other satellites have been able to do – watch the sun for the majority of a solar cycle in 11 types of light.

The sun’s activity rises and falls in a pattern that lasts about 11 years on average. This is called the solar cycle.

Solar activity can influence Earth. For instance, it’s behind one of Earth’s most dazzling natural events – the aurora.

One of the most common triggers of the aurora is a type of space weather called a coronal mass ejection, which is a billion-ton cloud of magnetic solar material expelled into space at around a million miles an hour. 

When these clouds collide with Earth’s magnetic field, they can rattle it, sending particles down into the atmosphere and triggering the auroras. These events can also cause satellite damage and power grid strain in extreme cases. 

The sun is in a declining activity phase, so coronal mass ejections will be less common over the next few years, as will another one of the main indicators of solar activity – sunspots.

Sunspots are created by twisted knots of magnetic field. Solar material in these tangled regions is slightly cooler than the surrounding areas, making them appear dark in visible light.

The tangled magnetic field that creates sunspots also causes most solar activity, so more sunspots means more solar activity, and vice versa. Humans have been able to track the solar cycle by counting sunspots since the 17th century.  

Image: Houghton Library, Harvard University, *IC6.G1333.613ia

The peak of the sun’s activity for this cycle, called solar maximum, was in 2014. 

Now, we’re heading towards the lowest solar activity for this solar cycle, also known as solar minimum. As solar activity declines, the number of sunspots decreases. We sometimes go several days without a single visible sunspot.

But there’s much more to the story than sunspots – SDO also watches the sun in a type of light called extreme ultraviolet. This type of light is invisible to human eyes and is blocked by our atmosphere, so we can only see the sun this way with satellites.

Extreme ultraviolet light reveals different layers of the sun’s atmosphere, helping scientists connect the dots between the sunspots that appear in visible light and the space weather that impacts us here on Earth.

SDO keeps an eye on the sun 24/7, and you can see near real-time images of the sun in 11 types of light at sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/data.

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“Goodness is not goodness that seeks advantage. Good is good in the final hour, in the deepest pit without hope, without witness, without reward. Virtue is only virtue in extremis. This is what he believes, and this is the reason, above all, I love him.”

[Gifset: 1 - The Veritas in the Haereticum. 2 - Bill Pott’s hand dissolving into pixels, revealing the truth about her world. 3 - The Doctor reminding himself of another truth, of virtue in extremis. 4 - River Song’s diary in the Library. The words “So what is the title?” - “Literally ‘the truth’ “ are written across the two library images.]

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Bae: What did you do today?

Me: Oh, you know, just some multispectral imaging of medieval manuscripts.


Thanks to the CLIR/Mellon team for their work imaging stains and palimpsests in our medieval manuscripts! 

Multispectral imaging can uncover hidden writing and other kinds of evidence of the history and past life of a manuscript that are not visible to the naked eye. 

((under readmore is some real time gifs of a jotaro from sketch to shading! it’s not quite a tutorial i guess bc he is,, in summary a guy with strong eyebrows, jawline, hair hat, cheekbones and sharp eyes that you will get better at drawing after a few times… referencing canon will help a lot)) 

((thanks! I’m not sure, it depends on the dude, I start all my drawings with a circle for the head and keep adding and removing stuff until it looks like the guy? reference if it looks weird, doing art studies of ppl will build up good image library to base off shapes on)) 

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