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Sometimes I have to laugh at the galra designs, from a purely affectionate frame of mind, because like. They’re so goshdanged lanky.

When they’re in action or in movement it’s all fluid and streamlined and intimidating looking, like- this species was probably developed at least partially to run down prey in a savanna or comparable setting like a pack of hyenas or a lion pride hunting- they’re built like sprinters, with those long, whippy limbs and big powerful hands.

But just hanging around, they look. Kind of hilarious, honestly, like. there’s just too much limb and shoulder for their head. If Kolivan, Antok and Ulaz didn’t have their fingers curled their fingertips would be on a level with their knees. They’re practically noodle people. Even more sturdy-built ones like Antok, Morvok, and Varkon have that whippy, elongated quality to them- stark with Morvok because he’s not even particularly tall, making his proportionate gangliness even odder-looking to a degree.

And I mean, on a general level, the looking a little silly thing is pretty much par the course for most creatures in nature. A cheetah could sure mess me up but their body and legs look too long for the rest of them. If anything that similarity between cheetahs and the galra might suggest galra are generally built less for endurance and more for sprinting, which would be reinforced because a common tactic in the Blade of Marmora’s fighting style is taking opponents on at a full run. (Keith does this too, even!) Big ribcage for big lung capacity, quite possibly a larger heart, long legs with (generally) well-defined calves and thighs- probably a build for running.

…Now I’m stuck on stuff I’ve said before about prey drives, and if the galra are more adapted to run things down rather than ambush them, they’re probably pretty good at tracking movement. Especially smaller things running in front of them. 

Fandometrics In Depth: Poetry Edition

This April marks the 21st annual National Poetry Month. Launched in 1996 by the Academy of American Poets (@poetsorg), it has become the largest literary celebration in the world. 

On Tumblr, #poetry is the most popular writing tag, with 10% more overall engagements than the next most popular writing tag, #prose. To top that off, #poetry was in the top 5% of all of the tags used on Tumblr in 2016.

From classic #haiku to transformative #visual poetry, #all caps poetry images and #spoken word videos, poetry on Tumblr has a variety of formats for you to tell your friend that you’ve eaten the plums out of their icebox.

Originally posted by hiromisuzukimicrojournal

Where the writers go

Since many people share curated works using the #poetry tag, a few other tags for mostly original work have popped up. The first is #poets on tumblr, which was the fourth largest community tag on Tumblr last year. Writers began using the tag to share their original work in the early 2010s and between 2013 and 2014, overall engagements (searches, original posts, reblogs and likes) grew 1366%. Over the next two years, that growth continued at an average of 214% per year. 

Originally posted by proudwallflower

#Spilled Ink started in 2011 after a pair of friends wanted a create a tag for poets on Tumblr to find each other’s work. Since 2013, The tag has averaged 41% year over year growth and has expanded to also include prose and other writing. It’s now one of the largest writing communities on Tumblr. For some sense of scale, in 2016, there were 32% more posts tagged #spilled ink than #poets on tumblr.

Finally, #Excerpt From A Book I’ll Never Write started appearing three years ago for short snippets of poetry—pieces of work shared with no pressure to be complete or finished. In 2014, only a handful of original posts were made with the tag, but were reblogged extensively throughout the year. Between 2014 and 2016, overall engagements in the tag increased 10,407%.

Originally posted by butteryplanet

Further reading

No matter what your favorite kind of poetry is, there are dozens of tags to find your next favorite writer on Tumblr. In addition to those mentioned above, there’s also:

There are also a number of amazing poetry blogs to follow:

  • Lang Leav (@langleav), a poet who began sharing her work on Tumblr and is now an international best-seller
  • Steve Roggenbuck (@livemylief), whose artistic videos and image macro poems break boundaries 
  • Button Poetry (@buttonpoetry), which focuses on performance poetry, and
  • Tyler Knott Gregson (@tylerknott) who shares daily haikus on love.

For more blogs, head on over to @staff and check out the roundup.

4

 The Chaos continues.

Welcome to the Links and the Link’s au, where everything’s still made up and the canon still doesn’t matter.

More Loz from me~!

Pt. 1

(please do not edit/repost my work to othersites without permission! Seriously just ask it takes like 2 seconds;;))