illustration applied

ziggy9911  asked:

Just curious on how you approach composition and perspective. I feel as if sometimes I think too hard, not really about what to draw but how to draw it and make it look interesting. The comic panels you have been doing are amazing. Any tips/references on improving my knowledge of composition and perspective? What do you think about as you lay your pencil on the drawing paper? what goes through your mind?

*STANDARD DISCLAIMER* I’m not handing down life lessons or trying to assert that there’s a ‘correct way’ to draw. I’m just trying to make perspective more approachable for thems that want to tackle it.

Okay. Let’s do this.

1. Understand what perspective is and what it’s for. Stay away from rulers while you get comfortable.

Everyone struggles with perspective because 1. it’s not well or widely taught and 2. artists tend to see linear perspective as a set of rules rather than a set of tools.

Linear perspective is a TOOL we use to create and depict SPACE. That’s it. That’s all it is. Your goal is not to draw in ‘accurate linear perspective.’ Stay away from the ruler and precision for as long as you can. Your goal is to create the illusion of three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional surface. Perspective is just a tool to help you construct and correct that space.

2. Know in your bones that you can ONLY learn to draw in perspective through physical practice. There is no other way.

Grab some paper and draw with me. If you match me drawing for drawing you will be more fluent in linear perspective and spatial drawing by the end of this post. Unfortunately if you don’t, you won’t be.

3. Sketch around in rough perspective. NO RULERS.

So let’s make some simple space. let’s start with a two dimensional surface…

K. We have a flat, 2D surface. Let’s create some depth by putting a vanishing point in the middle, and having parallel lines converge towards it. Make a gridded plane inside that space.

Good. Let’s make that space meaningful by adding a dude and a road or something. (Again, parallel ‘depth lines’ will converge into the vanishing point along the horizon)

And now we have the rough illusion of some space. I didn’t use any rulers, and it’s not perfectly accurate, but we got our depth from that vanishing point right in the middle of the page. And since we have a little dude in there, we’ve got human scale, which allows us to gauge the size of the space we’ve created. Gives it meaning.

You need people or cars or some recognizable, human-scale THING in there as a frame of reference or your space won’t mean much to your viewer. Watch. We can make that same basic space a whole lot bigger like this:

Same vanishing point in the same place, completely different scale, and a totally different feeling of space. Cool, right?

3. Sketch around in rough perspective MORE. STAY LOOSE.

See what sort of spaces and feelings you can create with vanishing points and gridded planes on a post-it or something. Super small, super rough. Feel it out. Pick a vanishing point or lay out a grid in perspective, and MAKE SOME SPACE. Do it. Draw, I don’t know, a lady and her dog in a desert. I’ll do it, too.

Good job. LOOK AT YOU creating the illusion of space! This is how you’ll thumbnail and plan anything you want to draw in space. All of my drawings start this way. I think about how I want the viewer to feel and then play around with space and composition until I find something that works.

Once you have a sketch you like, and space that you feel, THEN you can take out the ruler and make it more accurate and convincing.

4. Draw environments from life.

I cannot stress this enough. Draw the world around you, try to draw the shapes and angles as you see them, and you will ‘get’ how and why perspective is used. Use something permanent so that you’ll move fast and commit. I usually use black prismacolor pencil.

You’ll learn or reinforce something with every drawing. I learned a lot about multiple vanishing points from this drawing:

Learned from the receding, winding space I tired to draw here:

Layered, interior spaces:

You get the idea.

Life drawing will also help you develop your own shorthand and language for depicting textures, materials, details, natural and architectural features, etc. Do it. Do it all the time. Go to pretty or interesting places just to draw them.

Take a second and just draw a quick sketch of whatever room you’re in.

5. Perspective in formal Illustration: apply what you’ve learned.

1. I always start with research. For this particular location I looked at Angkor Wat.

2. Once I had enough reference, I did a bunch of little thumbnail sketches with a very loose sense of space and picked the one I liked best.

3. Scanned the thumbnail and drew a little more clearly over it. Worked out the rough space before using formal perspective.

4. Reinforced the space with formal perspective. I dropped in pre-made vanishing points over my drawing. If I were drawing in real media here’s where I’d get out the ruler to sketch in some accurate space.

5. Drew the damn thing. Because I do my research, draw from life, and am comfortable drawing in perspective, I can wing it. I just sort of ‘build’ the ruins freehand in the space I’ve established, keeping it more or less accurate, experimenting and playing with details along the way. I erase a lot, too, both in PS and when drawing in pencil. Keeps it fun for me.

And that’s what I know about composition and perspective. If you want more formal instruction on perspective and it’s uses, you can use John Buscema’s How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way. Or If you want to get really intense about it, Andrew Loomis can help you.

-Jake Wyatt

A post shared by Haley Rutherford (@artist_haley) on May 7, 2017 at 11:11am PDT

“Slow Hands” by @niallhoran 💚💛❤ I created this illustration and then applied it to a single cover for Niall. Swipe to see more details of the original illustration. You can really see the full brightness of the neon colors and gold shimmer in the video. Love this new single by Niall!

Article: Timing and Pricing

The question comes up all too often, and I hope this article will help guide you with tips on how to achieve fair pricing for your art, fursuits, and more!

Introduction

Obviously there are a lot of ways for any given person to answer the question of pricing, in this article I am going to address how I arrive at pricing my creative efforts. It is one among many ways to price creative work. Once you read this article, I am happy to hear if this method worked for you, or see suggestions on improving accuracy (as I am still open to personal improvement!), but I do find this to be a professional, very reliable, accurate way to do it, as well as being useful for other aspects of the creative processes well! 

For a little backstory, I have been involved in the furry fandom since 1999, and fursuit making has been my hobby since 2001 and now it is my profession. I’m also an artist, a tailor, I do costume refurbishing, create unique props, and make my own merchandise that I sell at events. I am only one person, and don’t outsource my work to other companies, so I don’t have one single thing I do that doesn’t need the effort I put into it figured out. Even personal items, prototyping, and practice – I try to think about how much effort I put in to achieve the item I have created.

How to figure out pricing!

I time myself! I use a dedicated timer (I’ll touch on why I use a dedicated timer below), it is this one to be exact: http://amzn.to/1KOZdXK I ordered it in 2011, and have been timing everything I do ever since. I selected this timer specifically because it has a “count up” setting, so I can start and stop that as I work on my project, and set the other programmable preset buttons to count down to when I should stretch or take a break, (because I can totally work all day and forget to eat lunch), or even for when it is time to end work for the day.

I keep a log. You can organize your log however you wish, but I simply write my times down in a notepad each time I stop and switch tasks. I am careful to pause it when I need to take a break, or move away from my desk to end work for the day, if I didn’t do that then my times would not be accurate. In my log I write notes on what I accomplished within the timed span – this will help you generalize and find areas to improve in the future!

It is important to mention that I have decided to use a dedicated timer, rather than a timer app on my phone or a timing website on the computer, because I do not want the temptation of getting distracted from the task. You may have a different working style, that’s totally ok! Just be sure you are not approximating your times and are truly working towards accurate timing. How else will you know for sure? Part of being accurate about these times is being disciplined about starting and stopping the timer.

What does one of the timed project logs look like?

I recently worked on a fursuit prop skull for a client, a completely unique project that I had not made before. I couldn’t promise a flat price because of the possibility of undercharging, but I do work within a client’s specified budget so there are no surprises. 

Here is how my timed work on this project was written down in my log:
Planning: 30 min
Foamwork: 2 hour 50 min
Taping: 55 min
Pattern trace: 15 min
Cut fabric: 33 min
Sew: 1 hour 23 min
Glue: 25 min
Hand sew: 49 minutes
Teeth: 49 min
Paint: 37 min

546 minutes / 9.1 hours

I break down my times into minutes and then a decimal of the hours, this is so I can easily convert it into the agreed-upon rate. This timing process can even apply to illustrations or anything else you work on! Additionally I time all my prototypes and practice, even for things that are not as unique as this prop, this allows me to generalize future pricing to give an accurate quote on if I can work within someone’s budget or not.

Something I haven’t mentioned yet, but is an absolutely important part of pricing (especially if you are making physical things!) – Materials cost! Materials are also part of pricing, as is Overhead. If you are working for yourself, you should be keeping receipts of the things you buy for tax purposes. Looking back at the receipts for items you buy and use on your projects, you can more accurately estimate what you’ve used up for this project. If you bought extra material in the process, you can measure what you’ve used for your projects and figure out a fair materials price from there.

Here is another breakdown of my timed logs, this was for a Black Lab fursuit head I made. Is the time taken how long you expected? (Keep in mind I have been doing this for a lot of years, but I am also not a high producer. I make one or two fursuits a year, among other things. If you are new at this, or are a professional with a different working style, you will have a different experience from mine!) For this project, I also wrote a comprehensive materials list, shown below.

The time breakdown:
Foamwork: 4.85 hours
Head patterning: 2.39 hours
Liner: 1.43 hours
Furring: 15.83 hours
Nose: 1.56 hours
Ears: 1.43 hours
Eyes: 3.65 hours
Neck: 2.5 hours
Mouth detail: 2.4 hours

36.04 hours

Materials list:
Black fur (provided) - On forehead, upper brows, cheeks & back of head.
Beaver fur - on muzzle, lower brows & ears
2" (older lot) luxury shag - cheeks
2.5" (current lot) luxury shag - neck
Lycra, black - nose
Minky, pink - ears and tongue
Vinyl, black - eyelids
Anti-pill Fleece, black - Inner mouth & eyes
Whiskers (clear nylon) - face
Sculpy Ultralight - Nose, teeth
Upholstery foam - head structure
Quilted Broadcloth - liner for head & neck
Hot glue - various
E6000 glue - various
Paint, black/yellow/white - eyes
Plastic mesh - vision
Waterproofing sealant - eyes
Sandpaper - nose & eyes
Masking tape - patterning process

You can see that the amount of materials used adds up, even in small quantities! Think about the time it has taken to collect these items, running to the store to get them, ordering them online, going to the post office to deliver your finished project to your client, and so on. That should be included as part of your overhead. Overhead is your operating costs, and it is fair to think about to figure in to your pricing as well, especially if you are a digital artist who may have few materials costs yet have high equipment costs – or a fursuit maker, who also has high equipment costs, such as a sewing machine. I don’t have an exact figure on how I work in overhead in my pricing, but I absolutely think about it as part of pricing for something, especially if I need to buy a new piece of equipment to accomplish it!

What does this information do for you?

Okay, so I understand that the above may look like a lot to consider, but it truly is important to know. As a fellow businessperson I just can’t stress enough how important it is accurately knowing how long it takes you to make something! It is quite useful, not only for pricing but other aspects of crafting, such as deciding where you need to improve! I admit, it took a while to train myself to remember to start and stop the timer. I placed a few post-it notes around, stuck to my sewing machine that says “Start Timer” and another on my computer that says “Stop Timer,” little reminders definitely helped. Now it is second nature to use the timer and helps me get focused on working!

Using a timer also allows me to take into account if I need to shave off time to bring a price into an affordable range for my clients. I can think about it in the sense of “How can I pattern this more efficiently?” “Where can I design this to be simpler?” but still be stylistically good, and so on. It also allows me to see if something is not worth offering for commissions, because the price a client would likely pay does not match up with the amount of effort it takes me to create it.

Another important aspect that comes out of accurately timing your work is seeing how much effort you put into your pieces. It serves as a good marker to see if you are spending too much time on less-important parts of the task versus a very important part of the task. It allows you to quantitatively see where you can streamline or simplify your patterning process, or maybe just where to hone your practice more. When I started timing myself I found it incredibly easy to get distracted from the big picture while working on projects, in the past I have hyper-focused on details that just did not effect the end outcome, and timing has helped me recognize that. I’ve since thought of better ways to accomplish what needs to be done and use my time more efficiently. Some of these include rearranging the order I complete tasks, and even compiling a more efficient list to get started on future big projects. Setting yourself up to succeed is an important part of this!

In Summary

With your timing information and materials costs figured out, you now have a baseline for how you can price! This may not be the exact cost for the object or art that you charge in the end. However, it is absolutely a good start for beginning auctions, a low-end price for taking offers, or setting base commission prices by! Deciding your own rates are entirely up to you, I cannot tell you how much to charge, but I do need to stress DO NOT PRICE BELOW MINIMUM WAGE. You are worth more than that!!! You’re not doing yourself, your clients, or your colleagues any favors. Fandom work is very niche work, and it takes an immeasurable amount of practice and honed skill that should not be dismissed. You are a crafts-person who is skilled at your craft, and skilled labor has a value!

Old school fandom advice on pricing is incredibly varied, and sometimes involves the soul-crushing advice of looking at others’ work that you think matches your skill level and copying their price strategies. This doesn’t help you. I always thought it was really hard and demoralizing to try to research other makers I thought were in my skill range and ballpark pricing that way. I came up to a wall when I couldn’t find people making things like I was making, I was at a loss. I had to break away from that thought process and since I felt it was really unhealthy, and I really hate creative competition, timing myself has saved me the stress. Comparing yourself to others is a fast path to feeling discouraged – I’ve been there, grasping for pricing advice and feeling lost on how I should price a con badge or a sketch. Timing myself has thoroughly solved this! I can feel very good about pricing and the direction my work is going because I can quantitatively see the improvement as I practice a pattern and my times get better. I never feel like I am undercharging, additionally I never feel like I am overcharging either because I can see how much work it took! It is the one thing that has helped me get by confidently, without looking at what anyone else is doing, and still get a satisfying price for my work. A price that I am happy with and that clients are happy with.

Remember!

  • Time yourself
  • Pause the timer for breaks and distractions, to keep your times accurate
  • Log your times with a few details on what you accomplished in that period
  • Keep track of expenses and overhead to figure in to pricing
  • Identify areas where you can practice more to improve
  • Use past timed work to generalize pricing for future work and have more accurate quotes!
  • Decide a fair rate, never go below minimum wage! 
  • You don’t have to compare yourself to others! 

I do commissions possibly a bit different than some of the other fandom content creators, but I do hope timing work becomes more a standard practice among the creative folks in the fandom. This style of pricing has really been what works for me, especially with all of the unique and varied things I do. 

Keep up the good work and keep moving forward. I hope these tips help, happy crafting! 

archiveofourown.org
Soon We'll Be Found - lilithsins - Yuri!!! on Ice (Anime) [Archive of Our Own]
An Archive of Our Own, a project of the Organization for Transformative Works
By Organization for Transformative Works

Yuuri slowly dropped his shaking hand from his mouth, and it drifted down to rest against his belly. He was eerily still as he stared off into space, and the scared, confused look in his eyes made Viktor’s chest feel like it had a thousand pounds on top of it.

When Yuuri finally spoke in a terrified, quivering whisper, it made tears well up in Viktor’s eyes.

“What am I going to do?”

When Yuuri’s life is unintentionally turned upside down, he and Viktor are thrown onto a path in their relationship that neither of them could have foreseen. The future is a vast, uncertain cavern before them, and if they’re going to get through it, they’re going to have to lean on each other, to trust each other more than they ever have before…

…and it isn’t always going to be easy.


Explicit, No Archive Warnings Apply (but I’ll add triggers for possible miscarriage and other hazards of pregnancy)

My Comment: WIP,  Omegaverse mpreg, 13 chapters posted. Basically, this is the most disaster-prone pregnancy in history. Lilithsins handles every disaster that befalls poor Yuuri with grace and sensitivity, and it’s impossible to read the first ten chapters or so without your heart in your throat, absolutely certain that the angst is going to choke everyone involved. But lest you think it’s a heavy angst-fest - it’s not. The story has lighter, happier, cheerful moments throughout to balance the worry and fear, and in that way, it’s probably more like actual pregnancy than any other pregnancy fic out there. (And I do love me a good mpreg fic.) Updates are somewhat irregular but ongoing. If you’re a fan of angst and mpreg, this one’s definitely for you.

2

Hey! This is a super technical post sorry, but i’ve gotten several questions about how I do texturing so I thought I’d share! Here’s the topology and texture map for the kid I just posted. Most of the models I make use maps of gradient blocks made with Illustrator, that I then apply to each model. I use cinema4D for the whole modeling and mapping process.

Since gradients can be stretched horizontally without losing quality, it lets me keep the texture maps super tiny. Most 3D software will also smooth them out vertically, filling in gradient values that aren’t stored as pixels in the texture map. Most models I make use 32x32 or 64x64 textures and most characters (like this one) are 256x256. In a modern game engine, using such low cost methods per object lets you populate the world with more stuff!

Infographic Tutorial (Photoshop & Illustrator) + ribbon texture PSD download

Here’s a tutorial on how I made this infographic, as requested by Anon! 

I’m no expert on either program or infographic-making, this is just how I went about the process. It involved tons of experimentation and it’s hard to explain clearly so I’ve divided it into a few parts:

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

Where did you get the inspiration for the Betrayal? I mean, I got it that it has kind of affiliation with the Saint George-story, but how did the title come to your mind? It’s so genious that it hurts me and it gives a brand new conception to this well-known, time-worn tale. And the question (’Who betrayed whom?’) it simply makes me scream it’s so, sooo perfect - of course, I do have my own version, just like everyone else, but I’d still be really interested in yours. :) [Sorry for my English.]

Thank you very, very much for the kind words! For you, I have written a novel. It goes like so, in no particular order:

With a lot of my illustrations, I try to mix my influences. The Betrayal is actually one in which I thought I was relying too heavily on too few influences! Because of this, it probably makes the influences for this one easier to explain, at least.

For The Betrayal, I had a couple tropes I tried to cull together. My foremost intention was to illustrate a woman whose strength lies in her respect and compassion, not just in the physical prowess. This turns the Saint George trope on its head a little, since the Saint George trope is more about Man conquers Nature, huzzah. In short, I wanted an image which could inspire sympathy and respect for both the dragon and the knight. 

I looked at Michelangelo’s Pietà as the main defining narrative trope for the piece. However, I was also referencing Herbert Draper’s The Lament for Icarus as well as various Byzantine works for both the tone of the image as well as shapes, motifs, and composition. I did originally try to look for a couple St. George & the Dragon illustrations, but none of them featured that sympathy I was looking for. The dragon was often treated as a dog or a beast, without human quality.

Besides those specific works I was referencing, I also included things that I already draw a lot anyways, since I like the themes/motifs, such as ladyknights, sword-stabbing, sorrowful dragon-killing, and compositions that feature people lying about in shallow water (all of which I have illustrated at least once before in other pieces.)

The mood of The Betrayal was important to nail down just right, so I also made sure to act out the scene for myself in front of a mirror with a thick rolled-up comforter as the dragon and a t-square as the sword. That way I could play with what poses felt natural, vs. what felt forced and strange. It also helps give a better spatial and emotional understanding of the piece. (The more you pretend to be the thing, the more you can understand the thing itself.)

Additionally, I always compile a mood board for each of my full illustrations so as to get a feel for the characters, the props, and the environment. Some images from the moodboard for The Betrayal include this, this, this, this, and this. I basically maintain a giant file folder of cool images that I save for my own nefarious purposes, which illustrators call a Morgue File. For each individual piece I do, I use at least 3 images, but probably more an upwards of 25-50 depending on how complex the piece is.

Last but not least, I like to try and pick a title that will tell just as much about the piece as the piece itself. I liked “The Betrayal” because it suggests conflict, but does not resolve who might be the antagonist. I try to keep the title and the small amounts of text I attach to my images both relevant and interesting enough so that people do not just hack them off my posts, (since this is the internet and people have dubious amounts of freedoms.) I don’t just write them off the cuff most of the time- they’re usually as intentional as the artwork itself. As I am making the piece, I am also trying to find its name.

So…there you are! That’s some of my process. I don’t use all of these things all the time, but I find that the more of them I use, the more intentional my work ends up being. If you are interested in strange, convoluted and highly useful art processes, I recommend reading about the processes of James Gurney, Howard Pyle, and J.C. Leyendecker. Also, the processes of writers. Writers know what’s up, and a lot of the things writers do can be directly applied to illustration as well.

P.S. Thanks for your patience! I am sure you know this Ask is…many, many months old. But it was a very excellent Ask, so thank you.

About SW and fanfiction ._.

I’m thinking of taking part in russian star wars big bang as illustrator, but afraid to apply for it, because I love unpopular in my country canon parts (Rogue One and Rebels) and even in popular sequel trilogy my OTP is really unpopular FinnRey XDD

(Or I just should go and illustrate some of my fav english RO fics, because there are no ones in my language, lol)