illegitimate

- John Churchill Chase
A cartoon in Chase’s ‘Frenchmen, Desire, Good Children’ shows the saints mitigating a fight between French royals.

“The cartoon represents the fact that various sectors of French royalty were suspicious of each other and always struggling with one another for power. So when streets were named for royals, they were separated by a street named for a saint,” Chapman said. “What do you do with a live wire? You insulate it with rubber. And the 'saint streets’ served as a kind of insulator, if you will.”

That’s why Dumaine Street, which Chapman says was named for an illegitimate son of Louis XIV, was boxed in on one side by St. Philip Street and on the other, by St. Ann. It’s also why Toulouse Street, named for another illegitimate son, was flanked by St. Peter and St. Louis.“

- http://www.nola.com/education/index.ssf/2010/11/roads_scholars.html

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lol I love when they slip adult messages in kid cartoons.

3. Ann is advocating that we put more of a focus on discouraging illegitimate children, — Who the hell are you to describe a human being as “illegitimate” because you don’t agree with the circumstances of their birth. They don’t need your approval to be legitimate beings in this universe.

4. It is undeniable, when looking at the data, that unwanted/poorly cared-for/single-parent children are causing the majority of problems in society. — The data measures how “wanted” and “cared for” the children are? No? I thought not. You data only breaks out “single-parent,” which you have equated with “unwanted” and “poorly cared for” due to your own bigoted notion that impoverished single parents don’t want their children and take shitty care of them.

— 

misterhippity on the bigot Ann Coulter, via doctordisaster

Well said.

2

Beautiful Coin of Hieron II

This is a gold hemistater or drachm from Sicily, struck by Hieron circa 220-217 BC when he was king.  The coin shows Persephone wreathed in barley with a cornucopia behind her. The reverse shows a charioteer driving a biga with prancing horses and an inscription IEPΩNOΣ below.

Hieron II was a tyrant and later became the king of Syracuse, Sicily (reigned circa 270-215 BC). He struggled against the Mamertini and eventually allied his city with Rome. He was the illegitimate son of a Syracusan noble, Hierocles, who claimed descent from Gelon. He was also a former general of Pyrrhus of Epirus and an important figure of the First Punic War.

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