if-my-classes-were-people

today I had my political science class

and it was awful. Trump supporters were everywhere - people who weren’t even registered to the class came in to gloat.

I raised my hand and said I was more terrified of Trump supporters than I was of the man himself, because they want people like me (queer) dead - and was immediately shouted down with “I don’t hate gay people!” and “not all supporters are racist/misogynistic/homophobic/etc” and I wasn’t able to even finish what I was saying.

But I’ll say it now: even if you yourself are not any of those awful things, when you cast your vote for him, you enabled thousands of people to be open and PROUD about their bigotry.

If you’re a Trump supporter and you REALLY aren’t bigoted? I expect you to be out in the protests and the rallies and protecting the people you say you don’t hate. I want you rallying in front of LGBT+ safe spaces and keeping out everyone who wants to harm them. I want you speaking up for women, POC, and Muslims when you see them being harassed. I want you volunteering at planned parenthood. I want you to defend the disabled and chronically ill to your last breath. I want you supporting Jewish communities. I want you chanting “Black lives matter” in the streets. I want you calling out people who are saying the racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic things you say you’re not.

You’re not bigoted? Prove it.

Otherwise, your silence is violence. Against every minority in the US.

Did you know?

It doesn’t matter what religion you believe in.

It doesn’t matter what color your skin has.

It doesn’t matter what gender you are.

It doesn’t matter what sexuality you have.

It doesn’t matter that you have a disability.

It doesn’t matter that you have a mental illness.

That doesn’t mean that any of that is unnecessary or doesn’t deserve respect. Quite the opposite.

All of these should be respected, should be seen as something important to you and as a part of you, and discussions about those subjects should be treated with care, so that you don’t get insulted or hurt in the process.

But what really matters is you.

You are not your religion.

You are not your skin color.

You are not your gender.

You are not your sexuality.

You are not your disability.

You are not your mental illness.

All of these are a part of you. All of these are important to you, and thus should be important to the people around you.

But never should you be reduced to one or the other. Never should be judged only based on one of them. You should not be thrown into the same pot with everyone else that shares one of those parts with you.

You are you, you are an individual, you are a wonderful person, and you should be treated as such.

You should be treated as a human.

C: Today we did a mock trial in my class I was the prosecution. I never felt more embarrassed. The people in my class were the jury’s and they picked on me and went at my hair and my tone of voice. The defense team was lead by this half biracial boy and he kept saying sly shit under his breath. My team lost and people kept saying I was yelling even though I was being polite as possible. I came home and cried. No matter what I do I will always be the scary angry black girl.

anyway the introduction to matt lassiter’s the silent majority is both breezy and wildly claim-dense and stays one of the best works in 20th century us history and you just absolutely have to read it, thank you

lucyvives: i had trouble voicing a lot of my thoughts when i was little.. i thought a lot .. about all sorts of questions and nonsense.. i was afraid that not a lot of people thought like me.. or even more serious; that not a lot of people thought.. period. and so, i kept a lot of thoughts with me growing up.. i explored alll the questions and concerns about the universe and life as a phenomenon in my head.. and jotted them down in journals and compositions books.. Circa a decade ago, you sat in my religion class.. and you were one of the few people in that place that had their whole soul in their smile.. i could feel your aura emanating the strangest comfort and it never stopped.. it was fascinating… for the first time, i felt someone thought…. and i had to talk to you about everything, what about feelings, and emotions, what about metaphysics and energy, what about people and society, religion and violence, war and communism, money and love.. good , bad.. and music…you taught me so much about myself as i got to know you.. i grew with every word you spoke. you taught me compassion.. but not too much! you showed me what it meant to be there.. really be there for someone.. with honesty above all things.. and how important birthdays are.. and how if people remember and cherish the day you were born, you’re somebody to them.. and you’re by far, one of my favorite somebodies. thank you for existing & HAPPY FUCKING 20th BABY! i love you ❤️ #bathtubcouch

“i had trouble voicing a lot of my thoughts when i was little.. i thought a lot .. about all sorts of questions and nonsense.. i was afraid that not a lot of people thought like me.. or even more serious; that not a lot of people thought.. period. and so, i kept a lot of thoughts with me growing up.. i explored alll the questions and concerns about the universe and life as a phenomenon in my head.. and jotted them down in journals and compositions books.. Circa a decade ago, you sat in my religion class.. and you were one of the few people in that place that had their whole soul in their smile.. i could feel your aura emanating the strangest comfort and it never stopped.. it was fascinating… for the first time, i felt someone thought…. and i had to talk to you about everything, what about feelings, and emotions, what about metaphysics and energy, what about people and society, religion and violence, war and communism, money and love.. good , bad.. and music…you taught me so much about myself as i got to know you.. i grew with every word you spoke. you taught me compassion.. but not too much! you showed me what it meant to be there.. really be there for someone.. with honesty above all things.. and how important birthdays are.. and how if people remember and cherish the day you were born, you’re somebody to them.. and you’re by far, one of my favorite somebodies. thank you for existing & HAPPY FUCKING 20th BABY! i love you  #bathtubcouch” via @lucyvives on instagram

When I think about rebellion, the truth is that I never rebelled against my parents. There was nothing to rebel against. They were working class people. My mother was a waitress, my father was a truck driver - what’s to rebel against? Parental rebellion is a very Orange County thing, rebelling against your rich parents. And that certainly wasn’t my life.
—  Billie Joe Armstrong (Kerrang May 2010)

My kitty was in my prof’s lecture today I’m soft 😭

Person-First Language

I have a doctoral degree in occupational therapy. In undergrad, I took a disabilities studies class, and in grad school I took several more disabilities studies classes. One thing drilled into my head in these types of classes is “Person-First Language” I.E. “Person who uses a wheelchair” vs “Wheelchair bound” and “person with autism” vs “autistic”.

In my undergrad class we did not really discuss with other people with disabilities what they thought of person-first language. My undergrad class was taught by a non-disabled professor who had an adult son with cerebral palsy. My grad school classes were taught by both people with and without disabilities. 

I myself have multiple disabilities, both mental and physical (Among them: I’m HH, an amputee, have Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, have depression and depersonalization disorder, et cetera) and despite what has been drilled into my head, I prefer identity-first language myself, because my disabilities, while not my entire identity, are a part of my identity. 

People have many aspects to their own identities. In the occupational therapy world, we call these “occupations”, which means, “aspect of yourself that occupies your time”. Among some I am a: woman, sister, occupational therapist, vlogger, public speaker, atheist, amputee, writer, daughter, body-modification enthusiast, and so on.

I am NOT a “person who has womanhood”, “Person who has sisterhood”, “Person who is an occupational therapist” “person who has vlogs” and so on. These are my occupations and I use occupation-first language when I talk about them.

Why would it necessarily need to be any different with disability? Disability is an occupation and is part of my identity. I’m not a “person with an amputation”, I’m an amputee. When I am using a wheelchair, I’m a wheelchair-user.

Some disability-related language is outmoded and just flat incorrect. A good example is “Wheelchair-bound” because A: No one is “bound” to their wheelchair and B: wheelchairs set people free, they don’t bind them. Imagine if someone called me “prosthesis-bound” because I use a prosthesis to get around. My prosthesis allows me to function better and ambulate more freely in my community. Oddly, I am actually more “bound” (by way of suction, as in the prosthesis is literally stuck on my body) to my prosthesis than the average wheelchair-user is “bound” to their wheelchair! However there are more alternatives than just “person-first” language.

Person-first language creates a linguistic space between the person and their disability. I think that space contributes to seeing disability as a negative aspect of one’s identity and therefore has the potential to contribute to ableism. Note that I say “potential” because there are different schools of thought on exactly what constitutes person-first language.

My preference, generally, is identity-first language. Example: Hearing-impaired girl vs She is Hard-of-Hearing vs She is a person with a hearing impairment. I think, personally, that the middle one is best. It’s not disability-first, it’s not quite person-first, it’s identity-first. 

Having said that, I prefer person-first language for mental illness, because my mental states fluctuate. I might have depersonalization disorder and depression but “being depersonalized” is a fluctuating state.

The thing is, lots of people have different preferences about how they would like to be addressed, and when you’re mucking about on the internet or talking to someone you don’t know, you might not know what type of language they prefer. Some communities, in general, actively dislike person-first language, so it’s good to keep that in mind.

Also, sometimes person-first language just makes more sense linguistically. I have Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, I am not an Ehlers-Danlos Syndromite or whatever.

Anyway, here are some tips about how to know when to use whatever language, if you’re curious.

1. Ask a person what they prefer. 

2. Don’t ever tell a person with a disability that they are using the “wrong” language for themselves. If someone who is an amputee wants to call themselves “handicapable” and you think such language is condescending but you yourself are not an amputee, respect that person’s personal choice of self-identifying language. 

3. If you interact with a community of people frequently (whether it be the Deaf community or amputee community etc), figure out if that community has a general consensus on language and go with that.

4. Recognize that while some language can contribute to oppression of people, actual oppression is of far greater concern than language which has the potential to contribute to oppression. 

So the day after the election I was in my bio class and of course all the white people were either indifferent or trump supporters. My teacher took me aside and told me that she’s really disheartened by what’s happened and that she’ll always fight for us and that I’ll always be welcomed in her classroom. Cue the crying. Then the first class I had after the ban was put in place, she put up a sign that said “our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter” and all I want to say is I really love my bio teacher she’s so wonderful and such a kind hearted human being

i was in my myths class yesterday and there were people who legitimately didn’t know kronos ate his children like what do THEY read about for fun

02/06/2017 - UPDATE

The picture isn’t the best, but Santi attended classes with me this past week for the first time. He did great. Alerted me when I started to get overly anxious and applied DPT. He got a little restless towards the end of a couple of my classes (people were making kissy noises at him) but calmed down quickly after I told him no and told him to focus. All-in-all, I think he did amazing considering he is 7 months old. So happy and proud of my little fluff.

anonymous asked:

I have those super tall genetics.

honestly how dar e you

where i’m from we all averaged out to like. 5′1. half the people in my classes as adults were sometimes still about 4′9.