if you don't love holli

3

lyric parallel ; 

running from lions (2005) / holly (2007) / a love like war (2012)

Karen Wheeler: A Character Analysis

I can see 18 year old Karen Wheeler, fresh out of high school, probably well off but not rich, dating a 22 year-old Ted Wheeler who was probably a jock at the time. I can see them getting married in a little ceremony at the state house that only family and 1 or 2 friends bother showing up to. I can see her walking down the aisle in her mother’s wedding dress, a forced smile like a mask on her face. She loves Ted, but not in the way that those romance novels describe love. It feels like safety. After all, Ted came from a good family, he had a stable job. He would protect her.

I can see her contemplating whether or not she should go to college or get a job. I can see her pulling out her high school diploma and running her fingers over her name, written in dark black ink. I can see her thinking back to all of the high school English classes she took. About how much she enjoyed learning about the great poets and thinking that she could do that someday. I can see her sitting on the bathroom floor, only a year after she got married to Ted, staring at a stick clutched in her hand and trading away thoughts of writing poetry for thoughts of bottles and diapers and sleepless nights.

I can see her holding Nancy, then Mike in her arms and feeling her heart swell for the first time in a long time, and thinking that maybe the sleepless nights and the casseroles and the soccer games are worth any poetry that she threw away. I can see her trying to convince Ted to have a third child because her children are the only part of her life that she actually enjoys, the only thing that keeps her from wondering what her life would be like if she hadn’t married a man she didn’t love when she was 18. I can picture her realizing that she has lived up to every cliche about a small town girl and not caring because she has her children and being a mom is the only thing that makes her truly happy now. I can picture her worrying that her kids were in trouble but not telling her about it. Her kids are her light, they’re her sun and her stars and now they won’t open up to her. I can picture her utter despair at the realization that they don’t need her anymore. And she doesn’t really know what happened that week, and she doesn’t think Mike or Nancy will ever tell her. But she picks herself up and she takes her kids to school and she makes dinners because that’s all she can do. And every night she hugs Holly a little closer and prays that the day that Holly realizes that she doesn’t need her mom any more will never come.

But she knows that like a train speeding down the tracks, no matter how much you dread it’s arrival, no matter how much you hope and pray that it’ll never come, there’s always a train coming in the end.

And she thinks that’s a kind of poetry in and of itself.

Originally she was smiling.

Memoria^^^vvv

Dear me I waited too long to write this one.

 The Parts I - II - IIIIV - VVIVII - VIII - IX - X - XI - XII -  XIII - XIV - XV - XVI

You’re sitting here, an empty seat beside you - your hands folded across your chest and legs crossed, waiting impatiently for Holly to arrive. You were supposed to come to this thing together - but somehow work had delayed the two of you to awkward lengths, resulting in you arriving here first, waiting for her. This was rather awkward - given it was her cousin’s wedding. Weddings aren’t your favorite celebration - needless to say. And the whole set up is enervating enough, and with Holly who’s going to be joining you soon, the two of you together here would be a rather interesting scenario.

Keep reading

You Know It!

Is this feasible? I have no idea. Leave ALL logic here.

 Part - I  - II - III- IV- V - VI

Keep reading