if i'm not the world makes no sense

how can you tell your friends that they’re not worthless and that you deeply care about them and that you love them and that they deserve the world when you barely believe any of those things about yourself?

how to make a kids show dystopia

1. make it colorful

2. slight reference to familiar things

3. appeal to the younger generations underlying but present sense of anxiety about a world plagued by random acts of violence and an overwhelming problem of climate change and pollution. ‘The world is going to end’ is a very present mentality and the colorful optimism of kids-apocalypse assures them that it will still be okay after all that.

4. make it gay.

My dad told me a story recently about how he was in Boy Scouts or something and they went on a hike and were each given a rifle and one single bullet to practice shooting with (idk, it was the 70s or whatever). One of his friends, whom I’ll refer to as Steel Balls for reasons that will soon become clear, beckons my dad to a part of the woods and points to a giant hornets nest up in a tree. SB announces that he’s going to shoot it, waits for my dad to take cover (as one should in this situation), and fires off his only round into the nest. Sure enough, a swarm of pissed off hornets descend upon SB, who stands stoically and perfectly still at the base of the tree. Dad maintains that, despite their buzzing right around him, none of the hornets stung his friend, and they soon calmed down and returned to their newly renovated nest. SB turns back to face my dad and imparts this chunk of wisdom: “That’s the secret to dealing with hornets, Jim. They don’t know humans make rifle shots; they don’t know where the noise came from. You gotta stand still and don’t move, and they won’t chase you. If you run, they know you’re guilty.” Apparently dad was so awed he gave up his single bullet so SB could shoot the nest a second time, with the same results.

Long story short: hornets can sense guilt and there are people in the world who have tested this theory.

anonymous asked:

Have you read any fics where Viktor and Yuuri are switched? Sorta like everything is the same except Yuuri is the legend and Viktor is the untapped potential? I'm not sure if I'm making much sense. Sorry.

Thanks for these requests! This is a great AU!


Role Reversal AU


body music (reverse au) series by fan_nerd, Teen, 31k
A series of fics where yuuri is 27/28 and is victor’s coach; victor is 23/24 and has idolized yuuri. role reversal au. LOVE! Must read!

Love is a Special Sort of Power by sushicorps (Inclinant), Gen, 2.9k (WIP)
27-year-old reigning world champion and soon-to-be-coach Katsuki Yuuri’s power of love is super effective! AWESOME fic!

Saudade by AdvisedPanic, Teen, 6.6k
After an injury at the GPS that prevents his 5th consecutive win, Victor vows to return to skating to reclaim his title. Katsuki Yuuri is a ballet danseur who suffered a similar injury years before and made a successful comeback. Yuuri choreographs and coaches Victor through his toughest competitive season yet, but as it will always be, they fall in love along the way. Great role reversal AU!

Strut by Panny, Mature, 15k (WIP)
All Victor had ever wanted was to skate on the same ice as his idol, Yuuri Katsuki, as an equal. All Yuuri wanted was to be a figure skating hermit and ignore the world. Thumbs up!

Constellations (Things You Left Unsaid) by DasWarSchonKaputt, Teen, 28k
Role reversal au, wherein Yuuri is a figure skating legend in the making - mostly made, or so they say - who decides to take a season off at the peak of his career, and Victor is the runaway international student from Russia who joins his university and cons Yuuri into becoming his coach. Definitely recommend!

Victor On Ice by Artdefines06, Gen, 19k (WIP)
Victor Nikiforov won’t be skating this season. What was Yuuri supposed to do now? Must read!

I Want to Skate like Him by IdunAurora, Mature, 27k
At age 27, five time consecutive world figure skating champion Yuuri Katsuki decides to retire. He has barely made it home to Hasetsu before he finds an eager and all too enthusiastic silver-haired Russian on the doorstep of Yu-Topia Akatsuki, demanding Yuuri to coach him. LOVE!

A Sequence for You by wisia, Teen, 4.7k (WIP)
Yuuri Katsuki retired from ice skating without any medals or breaking any records. It’s fine. He couldn’t have made it anyway. So, why was Victor Nikiforov asking him to be his coach? Highly recommend!

Allegro Appassionato! : A Yuri!!! on Ice Role Reversal AU series by Daughter of Vayu (aquaregia), Teen, 11k
There was a man who took the figure skating world by storm. There was a man who toppled the living legend, and was crowned as the Ice Prince. And the man disappeared, no one ever heard from him again. Until a video was posted on YouTube, and Yuri Plisetsky took off to Japan. Great role reversal AU!

On Ice, Yuri!!! by octothorpe, Gen, 4.8k (WIP)
Yuuri Katsuki’s winning routine always involved the following steps: receive the gold medal and bouquet, smile at the cameras, and graciously thank his supporters. Instead of participating in the after-podium charade, he finds himself at emergency step number four: take refuge in a bathroom stall to quell the beginnings of an anxiety attack. Can’t wait for more!


The awesome role reversal gif is created by @angelshawke! Check out their blog!

9

AhRo is everything to me. Not because I want or need her. She is the reason I’m still alive and breathing.

requested by @evil-writer
[insp.]

Okay, so I have a lot of feelings about this, so I’m going to share. 

I love a lot of moments in the new Beauty and the Beast, and there are so many lines that I greatly enjoyed, whether they be lifted from the original film or added to the new script. However, there’s one in particular that stuck out to me, and while it seems like a minor and insignificant moment, I have to admit it’s my absolute favorite line in the whole film. Which one am I talking about?

“I’m sorry I ever called your father a thief.”

This just resonated with me so much, and it was the moment where I truly understood that this version of the Beast had changed. It gave his choice to free Belle and let her go save her father more depth than in the cartoon. (As wonderful and moving as that original moment is!)

See, the thing is that a lot of the Beast’s problems come from his inability to look past outward appearances, and he bases his entire opinion of a person on how their first impression seems to him. The obvious point here is when the Enchantress punishes him for not allowing a poor, ugly old lady to sleep in his castle, but we see this pattern repeated when the Beast imprisons Maurice for taking a rose, believing Maurice deserves to be punished for being a “thief.” He feels disdain towards Maurice and even Belle at first, even going so far as to say, “She’s the daughter of a common thief. What kind of person do you think that makes her?” In the Beast’s eyes, Belle is not worthy of his respect, because he thinks that common thieves are common thieves, and nothing more. 

However, you see his opinion towards Belle start to change when she helps him back inside after he’s mauled by wolves, when he was probably expecting her to just run off and leave him to be eaten alive. They connect, they grow closer, all of that loveliness we expect from this story. He starts to see Belle as a normal person, with her own thoughts and feelings and loved ones, and as a result, he too begins to change thanks to her influence. He realizes the error of his ways, which is what the Enchantress wanted.

But the thing that makes the Beast truly feel remorse and understand the issues with his behavior? Learning about Belle’s parents. Suddenly, once he sees what happened to Belle’s mother and learns what Maurice did to protect his daughter, he realizes that Maurice is not a bad person by any means, and is much more than just a “common thief.” Something as minor as taking a rose as a gift for your daughter seems so insignificant next to what this small family has been through. Maurice just wanted to make his daughter happy, and Belle’s devotion to her father by taking his place in a life sentence makes perfect sense. The Beast realizes that these people are humans who truly love and care for one another, who would do anything to keep each other safe and happy. What’s more, the reason Belle is in this situation in the first place is because the Beast decided to punish Maurice just for loving his daughter. 

So…the Beast says sorry. Sorry for not looking past the fact that Maurice was plucking a rose from his garden. Sorry for jumping to conclusions. Sorry for being the awful monster he was before. The Beast knows how wrong he was.

I think this is exactly what’s on his mind when the Beast chooses to let Belle go. His own wants and needs need to be pushed aside for Belle’s own wellbeing; this isn’t Belle’s issue. Belle wasn’t the one who placed them all under a curse, so why should she be kept from her father in order to break a spell? As mentioned earlier, Belle’s only here in the first place because of her father. The Beast understands how much Belle loves Maurice and how much Maurice loves Belle, and with his newfound ability to see the thief more deeply, he lets Belle go. He doesn’t want Maurice to be put in harm’s way thanks to his own terrible actions, and it’s not just a desire to make Belle happy that factors into his decision, but also concern and remorse for Maurice, the “common thief” he initially despised just for existing. 

In essence: The Beast doesn’t just change in this version thanks to a woman’s love, but also thanks to a newfound compassion for those he initially writes off. Now, he’ll be sure to think twice before turning a poor person away into the bitter cold. Now, he’ll learn more about a man’s character before giving him a life sentence for taking a rose. Now, he can see the world as more than just props under the mercy of his own selfish opinions. Being introduced to Belle opens the Beast up to a whole new reality that helps him overcome the error of his ways, and Maurice is a huge catalyst in this realization. 

Friendly reminder that for all the critics bitching about how "sombre" and "gloomy" WW1 film Wonder Woman looks like...

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER wasn’t exactly a parade of colors and humor and laughter and jokes either.

The ONE time the MCU made war film, they didn’t treat an actual historical event that resulted in countless deaths and atrocities with a light hand and audience disrespect - so neither will the DCEU.

Stop acting like humor and light-heartedness is the measuring stick for a good comicbook movie. Not everything in life will be better off handled with a laugh. Some things just ARE sad and heartbreaking, and no amount of “humor-washing” is gonna fix that. IT DOESN’T NEED FIXING, it needs RESPECTING.

So yeah, rather than arguing about how Wonder Woman lacks color and laughter like a good ole MCU film - think about how sullen and sombre Steve Rogers was during life circa WWII. Ask yourself why that was. Shit will make a whole lot more sense when you do.

phil makes me feel the way i do when i’m on an early morning road trip, comfortably sleepy, the sky painted with pink and orange as the sun’s rays peak through the clouds warming my skin, the world draped with a glow of something new filling me with a sense of calming hope for the moments to come

koruga  asked:

I really love creating aliens and just having short stories and drawings of humans and aliens interacting. Right now I'm making a few sketches for a "planetary colonisation committee" (name pending) that seeks to make various uninhabited worlds liveable for multiple lifeforms. Of course there's a human, but do you have any ideas what aliens would look like?

So my first thought was that I am a horrible person to ask about this (not that you knew this), because I didn’t grow up watching. E.T. or Star Wars or Star Trek or X-Files. When I think “alien,” I think of:

Originally posted by sailormoonpedia

Originally posted by cute-goblin-child

Originally posted by stitchholdsmyheart

Flying whitish elves with weird fashion sense, or a blue fluff with weird fashion sense.

(There’s also the case of the My Teacher is an Alien books by Bruce Coville, but I don’t actually remember what the aliens looked like–only that the main human character spent a good amount of time in one scene trying to find a bathroom that could be used by humans, and then later had the same problem finding a chair.)

Anyway.

This one guy wrote a book theorizing that alien life (including plants and animals) would end up similar to that found on earth

They might start similarly to old now-extinct earth creatures and take a different evolutionary route

This guy has modeled 8 different kinds of alien life depending on different planets/habitats

7 different people speculate on alien life, including the reasons something might or might not evolve. (Eyes are necessary. More than one, probably. Doesn’t have to be two.)

Wikipedia has a “list of fictional extraterrestrials by form,” which might give you some ideas

anonymous asked:

Some shippers are giving up hope because S3 hasn't been shipper-y and there's only one ep left. I never expected (that much) more that what we got. And look at S2. Subtle shipper season with bigger moments (eg I could kiss you) and then the finale happened. The "alone" talk and the handshake. S3 finale will cover a lot and still have time for those two. There has to be at least one significant moment and why not a big shipper one. Or at least one open for interpretation & hope. ps. AND THE HUG!

Yessss hugs and first names must be coming. I think it’s been insanely shipper-y - more than I dared hope for, really. I was resigned to the idea that Hardy would be brought back to Broadchurch by the case, against his will, but nope. He came back because this was the only place that felt like home, and he thought it was the best place for Daisy to have a second chance, like he had. He came back to be with Ellie and because he wants to be here, they’re disgustingly domestic together, they help with parenting, they’re both ready to move on romantically… of course there was never going to be any dating and kissing, Broadchurch isn’t that kind of show and the case itself had to come first, but simmering beneath it all is some achingly sweet romantic and domestic tension between them. Maybe it’ll be left so you can read it as either platonic or romantic, maybe there’ll be nudge towards romantic in the finale… idk, apart from that weird date of Hardy’s I’m pretty happy with what’s occurred on the shipping front

todoloquetecaemal-deactivated20  asked:

i'm thinking on working on a fanfiction. it's focused on the harry potter world, and even though i want to make the characters seem noticeable different and grown as people, i still want to have it make sense and stay true to the story, since it happens right after the books end. any advice? thank you, love!

Thanks for your question, darling!  This is a really interesting topic to discuss, since so many fanfic writers try their hand at the aged-up AU without really thinking about what that entails.  No one really talks about it, so of course, we all go at it blindly.  But I have a few thoughts that might help :)


Writing Aged-Up Characters

I’d like to note first that this post applies best to characters aged up from 1-15 years older than their current age.  Once you start aging characters from 20 to 50 years old, the process becomes much more complicated – especially considering the life experiences in that time frame, like marriage/divorce, children, career changes, retirement, health changes, etc.  This is also a process that mainly involves list-making, so if you like lists, then you’re gonna love this (+ any of my ideas tbh I’m such a list whore).  Anyway

Step 1: List the Character’s Traits

You were warned.  The first step to aging a character properly is to take inventory of who they are now – their negative and positive traits alike.  How extensive you choose to be is really up to you.  You can list all their major traits, their preferences and fears, down to their quirks and sense of humor.  Or you can just stick to their major traits (which is what I’ll be doing for the example list).  From experience, though, I recommend you be as in-depth as possible.

To give an example, I’ll create the character Kara Roberts:

Kara Roberts

• Daydreamer
• Patient
• Loves big dogs
• Bad relationship with family
• Strong physique
• Intelligent
• Loving
• Has a crush on her English professor
• Believes in “do unto others”


Step 2: Separate “Developed” and “Undeveloped” Traits

So now that you’ve got your list, the next steps are to help you decide which traits to keep, which to change, and which to remove completely.  The first step to organizing your traits is deciding which are developed, and which are not.  Which traits have potential to naturally improve/escalate, while others are at their complete state?  In Kara’s example:

Developed:

• Daydreamer
• Patient
• Loving 
• Loves big dogs
• Intelligent
• Strong physique
• Believes in “do unto others”

Undeveloped:

• Bad relationship with family
• Has a crush on her English professor

The process may not have been clear, so let me explain.  Traits like patience, loving dogs, intelligence, and morals don’t have anywhere to go from their current point – all you can become is more patient, more intelligent, or more entrenched in your beliefs.  Unless an external incident takes place, they don’t naturally change.

But a crush on a professor can escalate without external change – it can become an obsession, or an obstacle to education.  Or it could just fade with time.  A bad relationship with family can become worse with time apart, or better as time heals wounds.  Unless something situationally changes, these are the only two traits that are mutable with time.

So once you’ve identified undeveloped traits, decide how time develops them.  Leave the developed traits alone for now (we’ll deal with them later) and just consider how their current situations resolve over however many years your character ages.  Put that aside for later.


Step 3: Separate “Innate” and “Acquired” Traits

So we have a new list, minus the two underdeveloped traits, but it’s not our final list.  Next, we separate the character’s traits into those which are innate – those which our characters are born with – and those which are acquired.  In our example:

Innate:

• Daydreamer
• Patient
• Loving
• Intelligent

Acquired:

• Strong physique
• Loves big dogs
• Believes in “do unto others”

This is simple enough to distinguish.  Kara wasn’t born with a strong body – she was born a tiny, squishy baby.  She wasn’t born loving animals, but she learned to love them due to her experiences.  She also wasn’t born with the ideology of treating others how she’d like to be treated, because babies don’t do that.  These are all consequences of how she was raised.

So what do we do with this second list?  Reduce some of the acquired traits according to the character’s experiences.  Kara can keep on loving animals; in fact, she could work at an animal shelter and wind up loving them more.  But if she’s sitting all day in an animal shelter, her strong physique may start to go with time – or if she gets pregnant, or if she starts stress-eating – or even if she becomes an Olympic athlete, her physique would change.  And her “do unto others” belief can easily fade if life starts to hit her hard.  In fact, it’s more likely that her innocence/idealism would take a hit, as she leaves college and enters the competitive job-hunting world.


Step 4: Separate “Rational” and “Irrational” Traits

Now we’ve got an even narrower list, but we’re still not done.  Now you’re going to take the list of developed, innate traits and split it one more time: into rational and irrational traits.  Rational traits include matters of the mind, while irrational traits are based on decisions, feelings, or matters of the heart.  This finalizes the list:

Rational

• Daydreamer
• Intelligent

Irrational

• Patient
• Loving 

Kara daydreams because that’s how her brain wanders.  She’s intelligent because it’s something she was born to have.  But patience is a matter of the heart – you’re born with a certain amount of patience, but you choose to continue being patient.  You can be born a loving child, but you choose to act in that love.  Patience and love are matters of the heart – they’re not just how the brain works.

So you have a third list, and these are the traits you don’t have to just develop or reduce.  Irrational traits are subject to change.  Kara may have been patient and loving in college, but in fifteen years, she doesn’t have to be that way anymore.  Life can change her – normal experiences can change her.  Some of these changes don’t even require an explanation, because life… just does that sometimes.


Step 5: Finalize Your Character’s New Traits

So you have three kinds of traits which you can develop, reduce, or change – but you shouldn’t do this to too many traits, or the character can become unrecognizable.  If we took all our options and made Kara a selfish, unhealthy, impatient person who’s in great standing with her family and stalks her English professor… she just wouldn’t be Kara anymore.  But instead:

Maintained Traits

• Daydreamer
• Loves big dogs
• Strong physique
• Intelligent
• Loving
• Bad relationship with family

Changed Traits

• Patient
• Has a crush on her English professor
• Believes in “do unto others”

So Kara’s still got her charm; she’s strong, smart, and loving… and she’s gotten over her English professor.  But her relationship with her family is still bad, and as time progresses, this wears on her patience.  As her patience diminishes, she stops waiting for things to work out in her favor – so she starts to cut in front of people, abandoning the “do unto others” ideology.

She would probably behave the same with friends, although she’d be less patient during arguments – and she wouldn’t put their needs above her own.  In a business environment, she’d probably be more successful on the career ladder – but in customer service, her impatience would prove a fatal flaw.

So she’s changed, but not completely.  We can see linearly how she’s changed and why, so we believe what we see.  And that’s what makes the whole list process worth it!  You can see exactly what to change and why, without messing with anything else.


Anyway, that’s my method of aging characters.  I hope this helps you to age up the Harry Potter characters – I personally love seeing different takes on mature HP characters, so I’ll be looking out for your fic if you ever choose to publish it!

If you have any more questions, my inbox is always open :)  Good luck!


If you need advice on general writing or fanfiction, you should maybe ask me!

3

Not everyone has to be the Chosen One. Not everyone has to be the guy who saves the world. Most people just have to live their lives the best they can, doing things that are great for them, having great friends, trying to make their lives better, loving people properly. All the while knowing that the world makes no sense but trying to find a way to be happy anyway. 

Patrick Ness, The Rest of Us Just Live Here

captainsarcasmawaaay  asked:

I'm writing a fantasy story set in the 6th century in various places around the world, including the middle east. I'm concerned about how to represent the pre-islamic world without coming off as disrespectful or islamophobic. For example, the Kaaba being used to house idols. It's historically accurate, but I feel reluctant to depict it in that way, as it might be disrespectful. Is this a legitimate concern? What other pitfalls should I be aware of in depicting this setting?

Representing a Pre-Islamic World Respectfully

It’s historically accurate, but if it’s not important for your world-building, you might as well leave it out. In other words, it would mostly make sense to me if you were writing about the families that historically guarded the Kaaba or were the head of providing for visitors and guests who wanted to view the idols, but may not be necessary if you are already building a society focused on polytheism with characters that won’t necessarily be concerned with the Kaaba or those particular idols at all times. 

Remember, people of that era had their own house-gods to offer reverence to, gods that traveled with them. A lot of people were very poor and might not be able to have the opportunity to mingle with those families that held sway over the Kaaba and the traffic of visitors, etc. 

Also, the Middle East is a very broad place which doesn’t only include Arabia, so make sure to be specific in your details, narrow in on a particular country or locale and let that guide you and your research.

-Mod Kaye

the world makes more sense when your heart beats next to mine
—  (via sturzpoesie IG)

expihelladopeness  asked:

Hey man, really enjoy your work, I've been getting back into the series since the Netflix adaption has come out and your theories are amazing and really add another level to the already great story Lemony Snicket has written for us. Anyway, my question is; is there an unanswered question/mystery that you would really like a concrete answer to? I'm sure you probably have a theory for every single one of them anyway haha. Thanks again for all your great work

Hey, @expihelladopeness​! That’s a really good question. Some of the series’ mysteries are supposed to be left unanswered because Handler was making a point about the unknowable nature of the universe, the importance of doubting one’s conclusions and the crushing realization you can’t know everything when you reach adulthood. Part of the Baudelaire orphans’ character arc is the acceptance that they’re not going to make sense of it all and the world is extremely complex. So Handler were to reveal everything, it would just undo the moral themes of the last thirteen books.

That being said, he’s also said that the entire sugar bowl mystery is solvable and that some readers did guess the solution. So at this point maybe he should just make the explanation official in an interview or something. Less migraines for us!

On a more personal note, I’d say the mysteries which trouble me the most are the ones which affect the characters’ motivations and actions. It’s difficult to care about these people when you never hear WHY they do the things they do:

  • Why did Beatrice eventually choose not to marry Lemony?
  • What would drive Beatrice, Kit and Bertrand to assassinate Olaf’s parents?
  • Why does Esme care about getting the sugar bowl so much? Why does she feel it’s “hers” and not anyone else’s?
  • Why did Olaf and Kit’s relationship start? Why did it end?

I’m perfectly okay with narrative ambiguity but it shouldn’t get in the way of character development. There’s so much basic information we never got about these important players… After a certain point it crosses the line from “intriguing” to “frustrating”.