If God made you in and for His image, life shouldn’t ever be given the permission to challenge or redefine that truth. You shouldn’t ever live a second wondering why you’re here because of something that’s not happening for you or because of something that’s happened to you that doesn’t seem favorable. Your entire life is already fulfilled knowing Him, so you don’t need things to pan out perfectly to be okay - doesn’t mean we shouldn’t aim for things to work out well, but that’s not the goal and that’s not why we’re Christians. We’re Christians to be like Him, and to love each other the way He’s loved us. We’re not saved for a better day; we’re saved to shine.

Astrology: The Sun (Starsign)

The Sun and Moon in the natal chart are held in high importance as they describe the core components of ones personality in regards of how they identify themselves in life, the life role they play and how they care for others and themselves and their internal core reactions to the world around them as well as what that need to survive.

The Sun being the centre of our universe is what holds all the planets in a contracted orbit due to its size and magnetic force. It is the source of light ands warmth, and with that, it brings life. In astrology, the Sun is then essentially our core, our sense of self and how we centre ourselves. It is the part of the personality that can not be affected or taken away from us, though its expression can be negatively or positively channeled based on the aspect is receives to other planets in the chart (a.k.a other parts of the self as other planets represent the different facets of ones being and existence). The personal planets other than the Moon (Mercury, Venus and Mars) which all lie within the asteroid belt shows the symbolic representation of the aspects of the personality that is the mind, thought and speech, what we love and are attracted to and how we do things, don’t extend far from the core personality.

The Sun sign is the only component in regards to popularised Pop astrology descriptions that are found in magazines and social media forums, often recognised as the ‘Starsign’.

The Sun sign describes ones basic sense of individuality, how they chose to express themselves, how they identify themselves and the actions one does to accumulate a sense of self. When one is recognised for their self expression, a sense of joy and happiness if often the result for the appreciation and sense of validation for the way one expresses themselves.

Sometimes the core qualities of the Sun sign is rejected due to a heavy affiliation of ones other signs in the chart, especially in regards to the Moon sign which much more personal as it reflects our natural response to the Sun. This is the most common reason for the disbelief in astrology as only the Sun sign is known of though it only describes how we project ourselves NOT how we feel, which is the moon.

For example, someone with an Aquarius Sun sign who reads a description that Aquarius is emotionally detached but has a Cancer Moon sign, with perhaps Venus and Mars in Pisces would greatly desire emotional closeness and vulnerability, thus often resulting in the response “But I’m nothing like an Aquarius!”

So then how would you depict someone with an Aquarius Sun sign but a Cancer Moon?

Depending on the house placements and aspects, a description of this person may be that:

  • The way this person projects their sense of self is in a sense of the collective. They have a need for care and nurturing, and responds in a gentle and giving manner to the needs of others.
  • Their sensitivity is often fulfil by seeking out people by mass amounts to share and nurture with them.
  • This person may rather give nurture than receive it, as they identify as a responsible leader for the collective, but they may switch between being needy for others to being detached and taking the responsible role for caring for others (More true is the Sun and Moon make an inconjucnt/Quincunx aspect).

The Sun in the chart essentially shows how we distinguish ourselves as an individual in the collective (5th house vs 11th house). There Sun being associated with the ‘ego’ is often regarded as a somewhat ‘trigger’ term in metaphysical communities due to the idea that having an ego is being self glorifying and causes separation in humanity…it doesn’t.

If one to suggest that they rejecting their ego, then they would inherently be establishing that their ego is based on being ‘egoless’. Being an incarnated physical aspect of source it is IMPOSSIBLE to not have a sense of self.

The purpose of the ego is to serve as a conscious aspect of source that allows it to establish itself as an individual to interact with different aspects of itself, aka, other people.

The Sun sign describes the qualities that we express to establish ourselves as individuals.

An over inflated ego will express excess qualities of their Sun sign, thus making the person more replying to others, while someone with low self-esteem will express lower expressions of their sun sign, often looking for an external person to meet to allow them to validate themselves through interaction. The Sun Sign will often look for another person that contains the opposite sign in its lower vibration to balance itself.

Example: A Virgo Sun with Low self-esteem will want to validate their sense of self for their need to be of service and practicality. They may search for someone who projects the lower vibration of Pisces (Drug/alcohol abuse and victim mentality) to then be able to express their Virgo Ego. The Virgo person would see that the Pisces ‘needs’ them, ultimately using them to validate their own ego to be of need of service. Problem is, the Pisces person may not want the Virgo persons help, thus rejecting the Virgos act of service or even worse, stating that their help made things worse, would then lower the Virgo’s self-esteem even more because they expressed who they were and it was rejected. This happened simply BECAUSE the Virgo was looking for recognition, not to express who they were without expectations.

A healthy expression of the Virgo ego would to act in service by doing something they enjoy. Perhaps it may be working at an ideal job, or setting up a self-made service simply to be of service to people by doing something they are passionate about, without expectations of gratification of their help.

In expressing a healthy ego, the natural repercussions if to receives gratification and admiration from others because the natural self expression of your Sun sign is magnetic.

Once you recognise your Sun’s sign, home placement and aspects, you can find and understand the best way for you to express who you are and also the results when you have low self-esteem + how to counteract it by finding a more positive outlet to express yourself. Ultimately, a healthy expression of the ego is highly fulfilling and rewarding and can benefit your self-esteem and also attract admiration and acceptance just by being yourself - Shine your light!

KURO WEEK - DAY 2: Identity

“And I cannot help but wonder,

where does ‘he’ end

and where do ‘I’ begin?”


Even after their escape, Kuro still felt the cold pressure on his back – the ever watching eyes of the Druids. Always waiting, always anticipating his next move to be a failure. Always looking for a reason to get to him. To hurt him and tell him how he needed to become the Champion – Shiro. Over and over again. Until he would believe it. Until he would embrace the idea of losing himself to the arena, and become their greatest weapon.

He could still hear them comparing him to his original sometimes. He knew he was an individual personality. He had to be. And still, after all this time, Kuro was at a loss.

He still wondered, what was real, and what not. What was him and what was Shiro? Which traits, which quirks, which likes and dislikes were exclusively Kuro? And which ones were copied from the original? Which facets of his personality were his? Which ones were only a mere shadow of a man he loathed and loved at the same time?

He was at a loss.

After all this time, Kuro still wondered, where Shiro ended

and where he began.

___

Okay, so my poor baby sometimes wonders if he’s a real, individual person or if his mind, too, is nothing but a copy. Second entry for the @kuroweek 2017 :3

yellow-eyed-asshats  asked:

I have a question that may come out sounding kinda rude, but why can't writers write poc as people, put them through the same trials and tribulations as caucasian characters? This may come out sounding different that what I've asked in my head so if that's the case, I'm terribly sorry

Writing About PoC Trials and Tribulations

I understand where you’re coming from, because it looks unequal when you take it simply as “humans struggle, so why can’t we write about PoC struggling?”

What Topics To Avoid isn’t talking about struggle in general, which is where the confusion comes from.

Yes, you can write PoC struggling. This is not the question at hand.

What that post was pointing out is PoC struggle is rarely individual trials and tribulations like white characters.

When a white character struggles, they are struggling with something that is an individual struggle that is treated as a universal narrative for that person’s individual issues (like, everyone’s felt like an underdog at one point for various reasons). But if you look at the dominant stories for PoC, the struggle is directly because of their ethnicity, such as segregation, or a racial-based war, and/or colonialism, to name a few. The plot falls apart when the ethnicity/situation is changed.

We are asking you to look at why you are attracted to struggles that come directly as a result of being a certain ethnicity. 

Starcrossed lovers are fine, but why does every starcrossed lovers story involving a PoC have to be set at a time when interracial marriage was illegal, and/or in a setting where one side’s family hate the other for their skin tone?

An underdog with less experience is fine, but why does every underdog involving a PoC involve somebody who came from an impoverished background and low quality schools because it’s in a predominantly PoC neighbourhood?

The question we want white writers to ask is: “does my character struggle and experience pain primarily because of their ethnic background, does my character experience a unique struggle because of their ethnic background, or is my struggle primarily because of individual circumstances that are informed by the ethnicities at hand?”

If they experience a struggle primarily because of their ethnic background (ie- segregation), then that is a very nuanced narrative that should be left alone by outsiders because it’s exploiting another person’s pain for your plot.

If they experience a struggle heavily informed because of their ethnic background (ie- underdog because of racism, navigating a system that has particularly potent institutionalized racism like the psychiatric system), then that is an identity story that should be left alone by outsiders because it’s treating various isms (racism, classism, colourism) as a tragic backstory to overcome.

If they experience a struggle where their ethnicity plays a part but only minor events change if you switch around ethnicity (ie- starcrossed lovers where one side is very closed off), then it’s primarily because of individual circumstance that can be written by outsiders who do enough research.

I recently saw a very cute concept where a boy falls in love with a Muslim girl who keeps halal. He tried to win her heart by cooking, but she refused to eat it because it wasn’t halal. Once he discovered what the issue was, he learned all about halal cooking and made her halal meals to win her heart.

This story is only moderately informed by the girl’s customs. The story could be simply that she’s a picky eater, allergic to some foods, or has specific tastes. Because you can swap out a few things for it, this story isn’t About Being Muslim. The plot would’ve changed based on what it was, but the actual plot point could be anything.

But if there was a similar “guy falls for Muslim girl” situation and his family was Islamophobic, that would be using Islamophobia for plot pain and reinforcing all the gross stuff Muslims go through because of Islamophobia.

Hope that clears things up.

~ Mod Lesya

I got a tumblr because I thought I was bi, and a close friend had told me there were lots of resources here. Then I discovered pan and picked that up, but I felt sort of fake because whatever my attraction was, it didn’t feel like “straight, but with all genders.” I discovered ace and was scared to use it, but the ace community assured me that ace is not a broken identity, that trauma-influenced asexuality was just as valid, that I could be an ace teenager and stay ace or grow out of it and it would be fine, that my capacity for human connection was not influenced by my orientation.

Takeaways:

  1. It’s easy to think you’re bi (or pan) when you’re ace, because no attraction is easily confused for all attraction when you don’t have any other resources.
  2. Aphobia is ingrained in our society and exists outside of tumblr–encountering asexuality for the first time, I thought it was a bad identity.
  3. The community gave me the pivotal support I needed to accept my queerness.

It’s tricky to nail down exactly what makes someone feel like a “racial impostor.” For one Code Switch follower, it’s the feeling she gets from whipping out “broken but strangely colloquial Arabic” in front of other Middle Easterners.

For another — a white-passing, Native American woman — it’s being treated like “just another tourist” when she shows up at powwows. And one woman described watching her white, black and Korean-American toddler bump along to the new Kendrick and wondering, “Is this allowed?”

In this week’s podcast, we go deep into what we’re calling Racial Impostor Syndrome — the feeling, the science and a giant festival this weekend in Los Angeles that’s, in some ways, all about this.

‘Racial Impostor Syndrome’: Here Are Your Stories

Illustration: Kristen Uroda for NPR

sormatumb  asked:

Aware that "a story about Z character" should be told by Z people, and wanting to write "about a character who happens to be Z" yet informed, I researched deeply to understand their sociocultural context and how affects their lives. But after research, many character traits I considered universal ended up being heavily influenced by their context and if I try to tie them up I'm afraid I'm stepping too far into the 1st category. How do you feel how to handle when the line b/w the two gets blurry?

When Am I Writing an Identity Story?

This is a very tricky point to handle, especially since culture informs people so much that yes, you can run into a lot of identity stories that you don’t realize are identity stories. Made even trickier by how often identity stories aren’t told by people who hold that identity, so there is barely a metric for “what is safe for me to write.”

My main suggestion as an idea is asking yourself if the plot points fall apart when the ethnicity changes.

I don’t mean your plot, because the plot around the points can change based on the ethnicity. I mean the actual landmarks of how the story will progress and key turning events.

Say you have a Native character. You want to write a plot with a Native character, and you want her ethnicity to inform the plot.

An identity story’s plot points would go along the lines of seeing colonialism’s ills all around her, having to fight to be recognized as competent by her professors, working towards an art show where she showcases her culturally informed art and proves to the world she’s a good artist. 

A story where she so happens to be Native has her be an artist with a Native informed viewpoint who’s trying to balance her art with her day job and a new boyfriend. She might run into racist art exhibitors, appropriators, and very ignorant people, but those are background events that inform the plot instead of being the plot.

In the former example, the plot falls apart if the character isn’t Native, because so many plot points are based around how the world sees her as Native. In the latter example, the plot changes if she’s another ethnicity, but it doesn’t fall apart completely. 

Hope this clears up the confusion.

~Mod Lesya