idc reblog it

Whenever I see an Inquisition wank post and it includes the ONE throwaway line that ONE specific clan of the Dalish made a member with magical abilties leave and the posts presents it as some kind of malicious retcon on BioWare’s part to make all Dalish elves look bad, my eyes roll out of my head.

Your very own character can point out in the very same dialogue that THEIR clan handled things DIFFERENTLY and found another solution, making it more than obvious for anyone with a speck of reading comprehension that it’s an INDIVIDUAL thing and NOT a universal truth for all Dalish clans.

some fae facts from lore

  • ‘fae’ range from anything like goblins and imps to the little pixies with the wings that everyone associated with fairies to the seven-foot tall members of the royal courts. some even consider the banshee to be fae. (also trolls, gnomes, elves, djinn, dwarves, leprechauns, will-o-wisps, etc.)
  • some think the fae are evil, some think they are fallen angels, but most are considered to be a chaotic neutral force. some might call this ‘whimsically evil.’
  • honey makes them drunk.
  • iron poisons them, as it does many magical beings.
  • some were-creatures were probably just fae in disguise, since fae can assume any form.
  • they sometimes lure humans with music that makes them want to follow and dance. they have to dance for what feels like a year and a day but it actually only seconds.
  • true names of the fae have power over them. they often use aliases when dealing with non-fae.
  • some people are gifted with fae sight, which allows them to see the fae and also sometimes peeks into the future through their dreams.
  • cats hate the fae, and the fae hate them back. 
  • iron horseshoes over the door can act as a fae deterrent.
  • they sometimes kidnap human children and leave their own children or elderly behind. these are called changelings.
  • fae are generous with gifts, especially for polite people, but prefer gifts in return.
  • that being said, better to avoid accepting gifts. you probably don’t have enough to pay them back. by saying ‘thank you,’ you acknowledge that a gift was given and that you now owe something in return. being indebted to the fae = bad time
  • fae can’t lie, but truth and honesty aren’t always the same.
  • asking for a favor will cause offense. make it seem like it’s their idea to help you.
  • most things offend them, actually.
  • some fae can smell a lie. there’s no way of knowing which ones unless they tell you.
  • fae use ‘glamour’ to hide their appearance or habitations around humans. ‘glamour’ can be gifted for use by humans.
  • it’s better for fae to have half-breed children than no children at all, so relationshops with humans are fine. it just rarely works out fine for the human.
5

When you’re under investigation and unable to act officially but you don’t give a f.. about UN’s orders.
Idk, I just wanted to draw theses two together.

A handy list of poisons for writing reference, provided to you by me, Bella

Poisoning is one of the oldest murder tactics in the books. It was the old equalizer, and while it’s often associated with women, historically men are no less likely to poison you. This is not a guide on how to poison people, you banana bunches, it’s a guide on writing about poisons in fiction so you don’t end up on a watch list while researching them. I’ve taken that hit for you. You’re welcome. These are just a few of the more classic ones.

  • Hemlock: Hemlock (conium maculatum) is one of the more famous ones, used in ancient times most notably in Socrates’ forced suicide execution. So it goes. The plant has bunches of small, white flowers, and can grow up to ten feet tall. It’s a rather panicky way to die, although it wouldn’t show: hemlock is a paralytic, so the cause of death is most often asphyxiation due to respiratory paralysis, although the mind remains unaffected and aware.
  • Belladonna: Atropa belladonna is also called deadly nightshade. It has pretty, trumpet-shaped purple flowers and dark, shiny berries that actually look really delicious which is ironic since it’s the most toxic part of the plant. The entire plant is poisonous, mind you, but the berries are the most. One of the most potent poisons in its hemisphere, it was used as a beauty treatment, so the story says, and rubbed into the eyes to make the eyes dilate and the cheeks flush. Hench the name beautiful lady. The death is more lethargic than hemlock, although its symptoms are worse: dilated pupils, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, tachycardia, loss of balance, staggering, headache, rash, flushing, severely dry mouth and throat, slurred speech, urinary retention, constipation, confusion, hallucinations, delirium, and convulsions. It’s toxic to animals, but cattle and rabbits can eat it just fine, for some reason. 
  • Arsenic: Arsenic comes from a metalloid and not a plant, unlike the others here, but it’s easily the most famous and is still used today. Instead of being distilled from a plant, chunks of arsenic are dug up or mined. It was once used as a treatment for STDs, and also for pest control and blacksmithing, which was how many poisoners got access to it. It was popular in the middle ages because it looked like a cholera death, due to acute symptoms including stomach cramps, diarrhea, confusion, convulsions, vomiting, and death. Slow poisoning looked more like a heart attack. The Italians famously claimed that a little arsenic improved the taste of wine.
  • Strychnine: Strychnine (strick-nine) is made from the seed of strychnos nux vomica and causes poisoning which results in muscular convulsions and eventually death through asphyxia. Convulsions appear after inhalation or injection—very quickly, within minutes—and take somewhat longer to manifest after ingestion, around approximately 15 minutes. With a very high dose, brain death can occur in 15 to 30 minutes. If a lower dose is ingested, other symptoms begin to develop, including seizures, cramping, stiffness, hypervigilance, and agitation. Seizures caused by strychnine poisoning can start as early as 15 minutes after exposure and last 12 – 24 hours. They are often triggered by sights, sounds, or touch and can cause other adverse symptoms, including overheating, kidney failure, metabolic and respiratory acidosis. During seizures, abnormal dilation, protrusion of the eyes, and involuntary eye movements may occur. It is also slightly hallucinogenic and is sometimes used to cut narcotics. It also notably has no antidote. In low doses, some use it as a performance enhancer.
  • Curare: Chondrodendron tomentosum is lesser known than its famous cousins, but kills in a very similar way to hemlock. It is slow and terrible, as the victim is aware and the heart may beat for many minutes after the rest of the body is paralyzed. If artificial respiration is given until the poison subsides, the victim will survive.
  • WolfsbaneAconitum has several names; Monkshood, aconite, Queen of Poisons, women’s bane, devil’s helmet) and is a pretty, purple plant with gourd-shaped flowers. The root is the most potent for distillation. Marked symptoms may appear almost immediately, usually not later than one hour, and with large doses death is near instantaneous. Death usually occurs within two to six hours in fatal poisoning. The initial signs are gastrointestinal including nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. This is followed by a sensation of burning, tingling, and numbness in the mouth and face, and of burning in the abdomen. In severe poisonings pronounced motor weakness occurs and sensations of tingling and numbness spread to the limbs. The plant should be handled with gloves, as the poison can seep into the skin.
  • FoxgloveDigitalis is large with trumpet-shaped flowers that can be many colors, but usually a pinkish shade. It may have from the term foxes-glew, which translated to fairy music. Intoxication causes nausea, vomiting and diarrhea, as well as sometimes resulting in xanthopsia (jaundiced or yellow vision) and the appearance of blurred outlines (halos), drooling, abnormal heart rate, cardiac arrhythmias, weakness, collapse, dilated pupils, tremors, seizures, and even death. Slowed heartbeat also occurs. Because a frequent side effect of digitalis is reduction of appetite and the mortality rate is low, some individuals have used the drug as a weight-loss aid. It looks a bit like comfrey, which is an aid for inflammation. Make sure not to confuse the two.
4

Jafael as Jaladdin

i can’t believe i have to fucking say this but it’s not okay to insult t*rfs by calling them dykes. i don’t give a shit about t*rfs for all i care they can collectively choke but it’s not okay to use dyke as an insult and if you’re not a lesbian you need to keep that word out of your mouth period. just because a gay person is a bad person or does smth you don’t like doesn’t make it okay to use homophobic slurs against them and you don’t get a pass for using slurs just because you’re in the lgbt community. i rlly can’t believe that i have to spell this out because this seems rlly fucking obvious but some of y'all are rlly that stupid.

if i ever do something wrong, i’m likely unaware of it, so please let me know, okay?

i genuinely want to improve as a person but the way some people are on here makes me paranoid that people are just quietly saving #receipts and building up a collection so they can “expose” me as a bad person one day or something…if i mess up please just calmly let me know how i can change