Icelandic magical staves (sigils) are symbols credited with magical effect preserved in various grimoires dating from the 17th century and later. According to the Museum of Icelandic Sorcery and Witchcraft, the effects credited to most of the staves were very relevant to the average Icelanders of the time, who were mostly substitence farmers and had to deal with harsh climatic conditions.

Fjaðrárgljúfur canyon in the south eastern part of Icelandy is often referred to as one of the most beautiful one in the country. It is a result of thousands of years of erosion, caused by the melting glaciers. Today 2 kilometers long and up to 100 meters deep canyon is being constantly carved by the Fjaðrá river.

Hidden at the end of a series of one lane gravel roads leading to a grassy hiking trail lies the canyon sporting the most jaw-droppingly gorgeous palagonitic rock cliffs you will ever seen.

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Bind Runes.

A Bind Rune (Icelandic: bandrún) is created by combining two or more ancient Viking Runes into a single symbol. What this combination is believed to do is create a more powerful Rune, than the individual Runes used to make it. How the Bind Rune is created is very important. Bind Runes should be kept as simple as possible so that each Rune is clearly distinguishable. Using more than five is usually not advisable. When a bind rune is too complex it will be less powerful than a simpler symbol. Bind Runes were rare in Viking days; there are not many examples of the ancient Norse writing them. They became more common among the Scandinavian people later in the Middle Ages.