ice deportations

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Congressman Luis Gutierrez had questions for ICE. Instead of answers, he got led out in handcuffs.

  • U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials handcuffed Democratic Illinois Rep. Luis Gutierrez after he refused to leave ICE’s Chicago offices on Monday.
  • Gutierrez was at the office with a group of lawmakers, community activists and immigration lawyers for a meeting with ICE about recent deportation cases. 
  • When the meeting concluded, Gutierrez and seven others felt that officials had not yet answered some of their most pressing questions and decided to stay until they did. Read more (3/14/17 9:12 PM)
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These undocumented Dreamers were outspoken before Trump. They’re going to stay that way.

  • Activist Erika Andiola is one of an estimated 1.8 million undocumented immigrants who entered the country as children. 
  • Called “Dreamers” — after the DREAM Act (Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors) — this group was granted temporary legal status under the Obama administration’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.
  • Throughout President Barack Obama’s tenure, a handful of Dreamers like Andiola have become well-known critics of U.S. immigration policy, advocating on behalf of the estimated 12 million people in the country without authorization. 
  • As Trump cracks down on illegal immigration, the most visible among them fear retribution from the administration for speaking out.
  • They have reason to be wary. While Trump has said DACA recipients will not be targeted in his deportation crackdown, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has already arrested several Dreamers — at least two of whom remain in custody. 
  • Even if Dreamers are safe, almost all of them have family members in the United States who are eligible for deportation.
  • Despite those risks, several Dreamers with high profiles told Mic that they were not about to let his election keep them from speaking out. Read more (3/3/17 2:14 PM)

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Federal Judge Blocks U.S. Deportation Of Iraqis Nationwide

A district court judge in Michigan has blocked Immigration and Customs Enforcement from deporting any Iraqi national from the U.S. to Iraq for at least two weeks, expanding an order that initially applied only to immigrants in the Detroit area.

U.S. District Court Judge Mark Goldsmith ruled late Monday that more than 1,400 Iraqis at risk of being deported from the U.S. could face “grave consequences” if they’re forced to return to their native country — and that the potential for irreparable harm outweighs the government’s interest in their immediate removal.

Goldsmith, who was named to the bench by President Obama in 2010, added, “the public interest is served by assuring that habeas rights are not lost before this Court can assess whether it has jurisdiction in this case.”

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ICE Raids in Austin: Activists rally after “unprecedented” immigration enforcement actions

  • AUSTIN, Texas – Local activists were standing up and fighting back in Austin after ongoing rumors of Immigration and Customs Enforcement raids in the city were confirmed Friday. 
  • Per KVUE, ICE detained 44 Mexican immigrants in Austin since Thursday — an “unprecedented” level of enforcement, according to local immigration advocates.
  • Protests formed Thursday and Friday evening outside the J.J. Pickle Federal Building in downtown Austin, where ICE was reportedly processing detainees, according to the Texas Observer. 
  • Another protest was held in North Austin near where a public ICE arrest took place Friday morning, documented in a viral video by El Mundo.
  • Eren Uribe arrived at the J.J. Pickle Building Friday in time to see ICE agents block protesters from four vans, which activists suspected contained immigrant detainees who had been nabbed and processed earlier that day, that were leaving the building. It was the first time she took part in a protest. Read more (2/11/17 8:17 PM)
independent.co.uk
Stansted Airport's runway closed after protesters surround 'deportation plane'
Stansted Airport was forced to briefly close its runway on Tuesday evening as police dealt with an incident involving protesters who had surrounded a parked plane. Activists said they were attempting to keep a "deportation flight" used to remove failed asylum seekers grounded at the Essex airport. A spokesman for the airport told The Independent takeoffs and landings were temporarily stopped "as a precaution" to allow police to check no protesters had made it onto the runway.
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Texas family broadcasts ICE arrest on Facebook: “You Trump supporters happy?”

  • On Tuesday, Texas resident Robert Espino broadcast on Facebook as U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement, together with the DeSoto Police Department, arrested his brother and his brother-in-law.
  • Mundo Hispánico identified the two people arrested as Eduardo Díaz and Marín Márquez.
  • “My brother and brother-in-law were cuffed and taken away from their families,” Espino wrote. "They are not drug dealers, rapists, thieves, not even a traffic ticket. They leave behind wives, sons and daughters. This [is] what Donald J. Trump supporters wanted — to see families torn apart because of where you’re born.“ Read more.
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Trump is already detaining and trying to deport the “Dreamers” Obama said could stay in the country

  • Now that Trump is president, Immigration and Customs Enforcement has started to ramp up its enforcement actions. (Vox)
  • On Feb. 10, ICE officials detained Daniel Ramirez Medina, a 23-year-old Mexico-born man, who had lived in the U.S. since he was 7 years old, had no criminal record and was covered by Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.
  • DACA creates protections against deportation for a class of immigrants known as Dreamers, who came to the U.S. without documents as children. 
  • In the case of Medina, the 23-year-old Dreamer, the detention is not only shocking but appeared to be a blatant violation of the Obama-era policy. 
  • On Friday, the Los Angeles Times reported that senior White House officials are exploring ways to end DACA without involving Trump. 
  • Ramirez’s case illustrates one of the ways they can make that happen.
  • Constitutional law experts Laurence Tribe and Ted Boutrous have taken legal action to challenge Ramirez’s detention. Read more (2/17/17 1:05 PM)
washingtonpost.com
Federal agents conduct sweeping immigration enforcement raids in at least 6 states
The raids mark the first largescale immigration action since President Trump’s Jan. 26 order to crack down on the estimated 11 million immigrants living here illegally.
By https://www.facebook.com/pages/Sandhya-Somashekhar/424900341023463

Immigration activists said Friday that they had documented ICE raids of unusual intensity in the last 48 hours in Vista, Pomona and Compton, Calif.; Austin, Dallas, and Pflugerville, Texas; Alexandria and Annandale, Va.; Charlotte and Burlington, N.C.; Plant City, Fla.; the Hudson Valley region of New York; and Wichita, Kan.

There were also reports of ICE checkpoints, targeting immigrants for random ID checks, in North Carolina and in Austin.

The Trump administration is facing a series of legal challenges to his recent executive orders to crack down on undocumented immigrants and cities that appear resistant to his immigration policies. The raids also come on the heels of a Thursday night decision by the Ninth Circuit Appeals Court to keep a hold on Trump’s travel and immigration ban of refugees and the citizens of seven majority Muslim countries.

Some activists in Los Angeles and Austin suggested that the raids might be retaliation for those cities’ so-called “sanctuary city” policies.

Federal immigration officials declined Friday to say how many people had been detained in the recent raids. A DHS official confirmed that while immigration agents were targeting criminals, they were also sweeping up non-criminals in the vicinity who were found to be lacking documentation.

“Big cities tend to have a lot of illegal immigrants,” said one immigration official who was not authorized to speak publicly because of the sensitive nature of the operation. “They’re going to a target-rich environment.”

Meanwhile, immigration advocacy and legal aid groups said ICE had declined to give them any information about how many people had been taken into custody.

cnn.com
There is an underground network preparing to hide immigrants
Faith leaders in California don't have hope President Donald Trump won't enter churches or places of worship where immigrants may seek sanctuary. So they are building safe houses and preparing rooms to hide immigrants who fear ICE will deport them.
By Kyung Lah, Alberto Moya and Mallory Simon, CNN

A hammer pounds away in the living room of a middle class home. A sanding machine smoothes the grain of the wood floor in the dining room.

But this home Pastor Ada Valiente is showing off in Los Angeles, with its refurbished floors, is no ordinary home.

“It would be three families we host here,” Valiente says.

By “host,” she means provide refuge to people who may be sought by US Immigration and Customs Enforcement, known as ICE. The families staying here would be undocumented immigrants, fearing an ICE raid and possible deportation.

The purchase of this home is part of a network formed by Los Angeles religious leaders across faiths in the wake of Donald Trump’s election. The intent is to shelter hundreds, possibly thousands of undocumented people in safe houses across Southern California.

The goal is to offer another sanctuary beyond religious buildings or schools, ones that require federal authorities to obtain warrants before entering the homes.

“That’s what we need to do as a community to keep families together,” Valiente says.

At another Los Angeles neighborhood miles away, a Jewish man shows off a sparsely decorated spare bedroom in his home. White sheets on the bed and the clean, adjacent full bathroom bear all the markers of an impending visit. The man, who asked not to be identified, pictures an undocumented woman and her children who may find refuge in his home someday.

The man says he’s never been in trouble before and has difficulty picturing that moment. But he’s well educated and understands the Fourth Amendment, which gives people the right to be secure in their homes, against unreasonable searches and seizures. He’s pictured the moment if ICE were to knock on his door.

“I definitely won’t let them in. That’s our legal right,” he says. “If they have a warrant, then they can come in. I can imagine that could be scary, but I feel the consequences of being passive in this moment is a little scary.”

vox.com
Iraqi Christians face genocide at home. Now the Trump administration wants to send them back.
ICE officials arrested dozens of Iraqi Christian nationals over the weekend in the Detroit metro area. Families worry loved ones will face a death sentence if they’re returned to Iraq.
By Sarah Wildman

“Chaldeans have been targeted by ISIS and subjected to genocide, as have other religious minorities,” said Representative Anna Eshoo (D-CA), who is herself Chaldean Catholic of Assyrian descent, in a statement. “Their deportation represents a death sentence should they be deported to Iraq or Syria.”

washingtonpost.com
THIS IS NOT A TEST: Federal agents conduct immigration enforcement raids in at least six states
The raids mark the first largescale immigration action since President Trump’s Jan. 26 order to crack down on the estimated 11 million immigrants living here illegally.
By https://www.facebook.com/pages/Sandhya-Somashekhar/424900341023463

U.S. immigration authorities arrested hundreds of undocumented immigrants in at least a half-dozen states this week in a series of raids that marked the first large-scale enforcement of President Trump’s Jan. 26 order to crack down on the estimated 11 million immigrants living here illegally.

The raids, which officials said targeted known criminals, also netted some immigrants who did not have criminal records, an apparent departure from similar enforcement waves during the Obama administration that aimed to just corral and deport those who had committed crimes.

Trump has pledged to deport up to 3 million undocumented immigrants with criminal records. Last month he also made a change to the Obama administration’s policy of prioritizing deportation for convicted criminals, substantially broadening the scope of who the Department of Homeland Security can target to include those with minor offenses or no convictions at all.

Immigration officials confirmed that agents this week raided homes and workplaces in Atlanta, Chicago, New York, the Los Angeles area, North Carolina and South Carolina, netting hundreds of people. But Gillian Christensen, a spokeswoman for the Department of Homeland Security, which oversees Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), said they were part of “routine” immigration enforcement actions. ICE dislikes the term “raids,” and prefers to say authorities are conducting “targeted enforcement actions.”

Immigration activists said the crackdown went beyond the six states DHS identified, and said they had also documented ICE raids of unusual intensity during the past two days in Florida, Kansas, Texas and Northern Virginia.

That undocumented immigrants with no criminal records were arrested and could potentially be deported sent a shock through immigrant communities nationwide amid concerns that the U.S. government could start going after law-abiding people.

“This is clearly the first wave of attacks under the Trump administration, and we know this isn’t going to be the only one,” Cristina Jimenez, executive director of United We Dream, an immigrant youth organization, said Friday during a conference call with immigration advocates.

ICE agents in the Los Angeles area Thursday swept a number of individuals into custody over the course of an hour, seizing them from their homes and on their way to work in daytime operations, activists said.

David Marin, ICE’s field director in the Los Angeles area, said in a conference call with reporters Friday that 75 percent of the approximately 160 people detained in the operation this week had felony convictions; the rest had misdemeanors or were in the United States illegally. Officials said Friday night that 37 of those detained in Los Angeles has been deported to Mexico.

“Dangerous criminals who should be deported are being released into our communities,” Marin said.

A video that circulated on social media Friday appeared to show ICE agents detaining people in an Austin shopping center parking lot. Immigration advocates also reported roadway checkpoints, where ICE appeared to be targeting immigrants for random ID checks, in North Carolina and in Austin. ICE officials denied that authorities used checkpoints during the operations.

[The ‘sanctuary city’ on the front line of the fight over Trump’s immigration policy]

“I’m getting lots of reports from my constituents about seeing ICE on the streets. Teachers in my district have contacted me — certain students didn’t come to school today because they’re afraid,” said Greg Casar, an Austin city council member. “I talked to a constituent, a single mother, who had her door knocked on this morning by ICE.”

Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-Tex.) said he confirmed with ICE’s San Antonio office that the agency “has launched a targeted operation in South and Central Texas as part of Operation Cross Check.”

“I am asking ICE to clarify whether these individuals are in fact dangerous, violent threats to our communities, and not people who are here peacefully raising families and contributing to our state,” Castro said in a statement Friday night.

Hiba Ghalib, an immigration lawyer in Atlanta, said the ICE detentions were causing “mass confusion” in the immigrant community. She said she had heard reports of ICE agents going door-to-door in one largely Hispanic neighborhood, asking people to present their papers.

“People are panicking,” Ghalib said. “People are really, really scared.”

Immigration officials acknowledged that authorities had cast a wider net than they would have last year, as the result of Trump’s executive order.

The Trump administration is facing a series of legal challenges to that order, and on Thursday lost a court battle over a separate executive order to temporarily ban entry into the United States by citizens of seven majority-Muslim countries, as well as by refugees. The administration said Friday that it is considering raising the case to the Supreme Court.

Some activists in Austin and Los Angeles suggested that the raids might be retaliation for those cities’ “sanctuary city” policies. A government aide familiar with the raids said it is possible that the predominantly daytime operations — a departure from the Obama administration’s night raids — meant to “send a message to the community that the Trump deportation force is in effect.”

Frank Sharry, executive director of America’s Voice, a pro-immigrant advocacy group, said that the wave of detentions harks back to the George W. Bush administration, when workplace raids to sweep up all undocumented workers were common.

The Obama administration conducted a spate of raids and also pursued a more aggressive deportation policy than any previous president, sending more than 400,000 people back to their birth countries at the height of his deportations in 2012. The public outcry over the lengthy detentions and deportations of women, children and people with minor offenses led Obama in his second term to prioritize convicted criminals for deportation.

A DHS official confirmed that while immigration agents were targeting criminals, given the broader range defined by Trump’s executive order they also were sweeping up non-criminals in the vicinity who were found to be lacking documentation. It was unclear how many of the people detained would have been excluded under Obama’s policy.

Federal immigration officials, as well as activists, said that the majority of those detained were adult men, and that no children were taken into custody.

“Big cities tend to have a lot of illegal immigrants,” said one immigration official who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the official was not authorized to speak publicly due to the sensitive nature of the operation. “They’re going to a target-rich environment.”

Immigrant rights groups said that they were planning protests in response to the raids, including one Friday evening in Federal Plaza in New York City and a vigil in Los Angeles.

“We cannot understate the level of panic and terror that is running through many immigrant communities,” said Walter Barrientos of Make the Road New York in New York City, who spoke on a conference call with immigration advocates.

“We’re trying to make sure that families who have been impacted are getting legal services as quickly as possible. We’re trying to do some legal triage,” said Bob Libal, the executive director of Grassroots Leadership, which provides assistance and advocacy work to immigrants in Austin. “It’s chaotic,” he said. The organization’s hotline, he said, had been overwhelmed with calls.

Jeanette Vizguerra, 35, a Mexican house cleaner whose permit to stay in the country expired this week, said Friday during the conference call that she was newly apprehensive about her scheduled meeting with ICE next week.

Fearing deportation, Vizguerra, a Denver mother of four — including three who are U.S. citizens — said through an interpreter that she had called on activists and supporters to accompany her to the meeting.

“I know I need to mobilize my community, but I know my freedom is at risk here,” Vizguerra said.

As Trump signs the revised Travel Ban, remember that it isn’t about National Security

It’s about using xenophobia, islamophobia and stoked fears of the “dangerous brown person” to codify steps towards racial & cultural homogeneity of the American population.


See also: Massive ICE raids and mass deportations across the country

See also: The prioritization of a massive, expensive and unnecessary wall across America’s southern border